Definition of French plait in English:

French plait

noun

British
  • A woman's hairstyle in which all the hair is gathered tightly and pulled back from the forehead into one large plait down the back of the head.

    • ‘Her hair was pulled into its normal French braid.’
    • ‘I had spent half an hour tying my hair into little French plaits, and clipping up the ends into a mane of fluffy curls.’
    • ‘A girl was sitting next to the couch I was on, her chestnut brown hair pulled into two French braids.’
    • ‘In this hands-on book, you'll learn how to create French braids, twisted pony tails, buns, cornrows and more.’
    • ‘Her friend's hair was in two French braids and adorned with red and white ribbons.’
    • ‘I had wrestled my hair into a French plait which hung in a thick rope down to my waist, and my emerald eyes, as always, remained devoid of any make up.’
    • ‘Celia was wearing turquoise corduroy bell-bottoms and a tank top, her hair in two French plaits.’
    • ‘At the club I coach at we tell our gymnasts that we'd like French plaits where possible because they are tidy and backward rolls are much easier!’
    • ‘Pulling on her socks and shoes, she went to the vanity, brushed her hair out, and put it into a French braid all the way down the base of her neck before tying it off with a band and letting the rest hang loosely, like a pony-tail.’
    • ‘The French braid is a classic and stunning hairstyle.’
    • ‘She changed into her bikini, pulled on shorts and a shirt over it, and fixed her hair into a loose French braid.’
    • ‘I wore my hair in pigtails yesterday, and today it's in two long French braids.’
    • ‘Her shoulder-length blond hair was pulled back in a French braid.’
    • ‘Melan was wearing denim trousers today and a tee-shirt and her hair was in two French plaits.’
    • ‘She was brushing my hair into a French plait to keep her trembling hands occupied.’
    • ‘The students are immaculately presented at all times with full make-up, white uniforms and French plaits, conditions laid down by Christine Tilley, who set up the college in 1983.’
    • ‘‘She's not mad and if she is, she's mad at me, not you,’ she replied focusing her attention on doing the French braid.’
    • ‘I had taken out the French plaits that she had put in my hair that morning.’
    • ‘It involves a 3-strand French braid and a normal English braid wrapped around the head.’
    • ‘Slipping into leather clogs, I looked into the mirror, checking to see if a French braid still neatly held my hair.’

Pronunciation:

French plait

//