Definition of fraudster in English:

fraudster

noun

British
  • A person who commits fraud, especially in business dealings.

    • ‘When one is dealing with fraudsters and scam artists, there is almost no chance of ever getting the money back.’
    • ‘People's unfamiliarity with the new money is likely to attract counterfeiters and fraudsters.’
    • ‘Identity fraud is where fraudsters use personal details to order credit cards and check books in the name of someone else.’
    • ‘The UK's telecoms industry needs to weed out the fraudsters and scammers ripping off punters or face the threat of the plug being pulled on the premium rate industry.’
    • ‘This month and during the January sales, at least 400 million will fall into the hands of fraudsters and thieves.’
    • ‘It also discovered that lax security practices by consumers and small business are giving fraudsters a base from which to launch attacks.’
    • ‘Pensioners whose hopes were raised almost beyond belief by news of a £2.8million windfall have condemned fraudsters behind the scam.’
    • ‘The fraudsters reportedly used previously stolen identities to set up the fake firms, lending them an air of credibility and a certain resistance to scrutiny.’
    • ‘It sounds incredible but last year 56,000 families discovered that a fraudster had masqueraded as a loved one after their death in order to take out credit cards and loans.’
    • ‘These people are cheats, fraudsters, charlatans and hoaxers.’
    • ‘Crooked business people, fraudsters and other white-collar criminals may also have an unwitting say in the early days of the infant currency.’
    • ‘Where the fraudster has perpetrated the fraud by drawing cheques on the customer's account, the victim's cause of action is usually for the conversion of the cheques involved.’
    • ‘If the business agrees, the fraudsters will then cold-call the public, but pocket any cash raised and vanish.’
    • ‘He was a crook - a thief and a fraudster whose empire was a house of cards that existed only to generate the cash that lined the pockets of his expensive suits.’
    • ‘But Christmas is a boom time for fraudsters and thieves, who particularly favour those shoppers who are careless with their credit cards.’
    • ‘Another scam involves a fraudster calling a bank and informing them that a company's contact details have changed, and then telling the company that the bank's details have changed.’
    • ‘The result was a two-tier system in which some white-collar fraudsters escaped justice, while blue collar fraudsters were prosecuted.’
    • ‘Another method is cold calling where fraudsters ring up and pretend to be from a bank and purporting to be upgrading security systems to get personal details out of people.’
    • ‘He said the fraudsters would target businesses that did not have adequate safety systems in place and they would look for and exploit those weaknesses.’
    • ‘Hotels and restaurants are being urged to beware, after businesses were targeted by two different fraudsters trying to con them out of cash.’
    impostor, fake, sham, pretender, hoodwinker, masquerader, charlatan, quack, mountebank
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

fraudster

/ˈfrɔːdstə/