Definition of frame in English:

frame

noun

  • 1A rigid structure that surrounds something such as a picture, door, or windowpane.

    • ‘The door slammed against its frame and the room was quiet.’
    • ‘Aluminum extrusions also enjoy wide use as frames for doors and windows and in storefronts.’
    • ‘I've put the second base coat of paint onto the front door and the frame and that's now drying.’
    • ‘Being stone built, with treated timber window frames, the house will never need exterior decoration.’
    • ‘I leaned against the frame of the door and held my head in my hands.’
    • ‘A second address in Birmingham was also raided, the entire door wrenched from its frame as police arrested three men inside.’
    • ‘By then he had jemmied the frame from the shop door and was inside.’
    • ‘I slumped back against the frame of the classroom door and rubbed my eyes.’
    • ‘He put on some black leather gloves and studied the door, its frame and the nearby wall.’
    • ‘You can change the glass in your windows without getting approval - but do need approval if you replace the frames or a door as well.’
    • ‘She rested her forehead on the frame of the open door.’
    • ‘As you can probably guess the kid didn't make it and unluckily got his head caught between the door and the frame.’
    • ‘He has destroyed carpets, doors, frames and skirting boards in every room.’
    • ‘Seconds later, Toby knocked feebly on the frame of the screen door.’
    • ‘I am having the spouting, windows, doors and frames painted over the next month, so that is an expense that was unexpected.’
    • ‘The wooden window frames were finished in dark green, a standard mid-19 th-century colour.’
    • ‘Every building contractor made their own timber window frames and doors.’
    • ‘His mother stood in the frame of the kitchen door, hands on her hips and a grim expression on her face.’
    • ‘The first line of physical defense of your home should be solid doors in solid frames with good locks.’
    • ‘She gathered her courage and tapped at the frame of the screen door.’
    setting, mount, mounting, surround, fixture, support, stand
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1frames A metal or plastic structure holding the lenses of a pair of glasses.
      • ‘I was convinced there were no lenses in the frames and they were simply a distraction tactic.’
      • ‘People with blond or light brown hair tend to look good in lightweight metal frames.’
      • ‘The trick though is of course finding the best pair of frames to complement her face.’
      • ‘Customers not only get information on what eyewear accessories they want to buy, but will also receive advice on the frames and lenses best suited to them.’
      • ‘Don't assume that people with light hued tresses should only wear light colored frames or lenses.’
      • ‘Anyone needing glasses is fitted with frames and lenses before they leave.’
      • ‘His glasses were solid black frames with rather square lenses that gave a harsh professorial authority to his gentle blue eyes behind them.’
      • ‘He wore those late '70s style of eyeglasses, with the enormous, thick lenses and black frames as thick as copper tubing.’
      • ‘Benefits include an eye exam every 12 months, a pair of prescription lenses and frames or contact lenses every 24 months.’
      • ‘With mineral crystal lenses, hand-made titanium frames, and silicone nose and ear tips, these glasses aren't for the thrifty.’
      • ‘All men should be aware of the impact a nice pair of frames can have on their overall image.’
      • ‘All the gold frame spectacles are separated, then lenses removed and frames sent away.’
      • ‘Usually made of plastic, the frames of these glasses practically stick to your face thanks to their shape and design.’
      • ‘Suddenly, my glasses looked too severe, squared black plastic frames with wide ear pieces.’
      • ‘Round frames can soften features like a strong jaw line or broad forehead.’
      • ‘They have a thin metal frame with slightly tinted lenses for bright light absorption and 100 % UV protection.’
      • ‘Dave produced a pair of glasses with black frames.’
      • ‘You got to the opticians, put on some frames - with no lenses in - and look in the mirror.’
      • ‘The glasses will then be transported to prisons, where inmates are trained how to read lens strength, fix frames and label and package them for export to their destination country.’
      • ‘Looking up, my eyes met two warm brown eyes peering at me through a pair of glasses with thin oval frames.’
      • ‘Metal frames are sturdier, giving you a more masculine appearance.’
    2. 1.2 The rigid supporting structure of an object such as a vehicle, building, or piece of furniture:
      ‘the wooden frame of the huge bed’
      ‘an old bicycle frame’
      • ‘The metal frames are removed once the walls are frozen solid which takes anywhere (in Quebec climate) from ten hours to three days.’
      • ‘Most other timber-frame systems here use traditional masonry on top of the structural frame of the building.’
      • ‘The town dump was situated there, and all sorts of oddments, like old bicycle frames could be found there.’
      • ‘The Wakefield-based firm makes frames for glass-walled buildings and last year it was sold to a consortium of businessmen for £16m.’
      • ‘For environmental reasons the structure has a wooden frame.’
      • ‘In the residential industry, some basement floors are cast before the frame of the building is installed.’
      • ‘The tarpaulin sheets for the roofs of the stalls went first, followed by the counter boards and finally the heavy metal frames.’
      • ‘One problem is that many buildings in Japan have wooden frames and tile roofs.’
      • ‘These cages are made of aluminum tubing with a steel frame, and the door is made out of thin aluminum.’
      • ‘The mangled metal frames of what were once York phone boxes are testament to a new, and potentially lethal, craze.’
      • ‘The metal frames of the chairs were all that was left in the ashes of the bonfire.’
      • ‘The two pieces that compose the front half are joined and reinforced with a roof frame that surrounds them.’
      • ‘The stools have metal frames and inverted steel ‘plates’ for seats.’
      • ‘Giant billboards have fallen; their rusted metal frames are bent like clay.’
      • ‘The delicate procedure saw a crane winch the wooden frame on top of the building before workmen set about ensuring every beam was in the right place.’
      • ‘The light alloy rear body is fitted with a canvas roof over a supporting frame.’
      • ‘Each section has its own ‘room,’ usually outlined by walls made of chain-link fencing on metal support frames.’
      • ‘Eastern woodlands and Great Lakes tribes created domed houses using lightweight stick frames covered by bark or woven mats.’
      • ‘Concrete use is also increasing in building with structural steel frames.’
      • ‘The school had been one of the few two storey buildings in the village, and the hundred year old wooden frame shook when vehicles passed along the road below.’
      framework, structure, substructure, skeleton, chassis, shell, casing, body, bodywork
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3 A box-like structure of glass or plastic in which seeds or young plants are grown.
      • ‘I give the young seedlings some winter protection in a frame and leave them in the seed pot until spring when they can be potted on.’
      • ‘Some of the alpines are afforded a little protection from the winter wet, and netted cages have been built over nursery frames to prevent seedling damage from cats and birds.’
      • ‘After he slid the pieces together, Ray stapled clear, heavy plastic to the top of the frame.’
      • ‘Most came through the winter in a cool greenhouse, grew on in pots in a shaded frame for the following year and flowered the year after in their permanent positions.’
      • ‘Once you have the frame constructed remove any weeds or grass inside the frame so this vegetation does not grow up through your propagation bed.’
    4. 1.4 An apparatus with a surrounding structure, especially one used in weaving, knitting, or embroidery.
      • ‘Later, as fitted her new-found piety, she received such petitions at an embroidery frame.’
      • ‘Now the frame looms specially designed to handle the synthetic yarn have doubled the income of the weavers.’
      • ‘It was not until the invention of the frame for knitting stockings by William Lee in the year 1589 that knitted garments came to the fore.’
      • ‘One lady, a rucksack, two bags, an embroidery frame and a cactus went from Kent to Bow?’
      • ‘Students will use a small weaving frame to learn how to weave and work with wool.’
    5. 1.5archaic [in singular] The universe, or part of it, regarded as an embracing structure:
      ‘this goodly frame the Earth’
      • ‘He has the voice that shakes the very frame of the universe and makes you wish to be unborn.’
      • ‘For Newton there had once been a true uncorrupted monotheistic religion, in which the frame of the world had been studied, as he believed it should, as the true temple of a living God.’
      • ‘For we know that if the earthly frame that houses us today should be demolished, we possess a building which God has provided - a house not made of human hands, eternal, and in heaven.’
  • 2A person's body with reference to its size or build:

    ‘a shiver shook her slim frame’
    • ‘She stared at her thin slight frame in the mirror.’
    • ‘Just then there was a knock on the door and a tall frame entered.’
    • ‘When he crawled into bed with her, her slender frame warmed his body instantly.’
    • ‘His clothes clung to his muscular frame and goosebumps ran over his entire body.’
    • ‘His giant frame swivels round searching for signs of insubordination.’
    • ‘She wrapped her free arm around my waist, pressing her short frame along my body.’
    • ‘I sighed and reached for her, taking her into my arms and holding her tightly, as her slim frame shuddered and shook with the erupting tears.’
    • ‘From behind, his slim frame and long hair make him look like one of the director's young assistants, rather than the mastermind of the £20 million film.’
    • ‘A tall man rested his broad frame against the open door of the room.’
    • ‘Her tall, slender frame was encased in a lavender satin dress devoid of sleeves.’
    • ‘The pleading look on his face, the rags on his body and his emaciated frame move you so much that you immediately put a coin on the outstretched hands.’
    • ‘As a boy, he had never quite managed to fill out his long frame.’
    • ‘She closed the door behind his large frame, then leaned back against and closed her eyes, emotionally drained.’
    • ‘She does not look much more than a teenager with her slight frame and young face.’
    • ‘She was small, with a slender frame - built for speed rather than power, she thought impassively.’
    • ‘Despite his small frame, his body was strong and stout due to a healthy regimen of exercises he had maintained since his school days.’
    • ‘Soon, beer-bellied men will be squeezing their bulky frames into pieces of elastic and pulling on trousers two, or maybe even three sizes too small.’
    • ‘He sported a black tee, one that, Alex noted disgustedly, fit his tall, muscular frame snugly.’
    • ‘His combative language and his defiant shouting were full of bravado, and he had the large frame and muscular build to back up his boasts.’
    • ‘She wrapped her arm around his waist and tried to support his large frame with hers as she helped him back to their building.’
    body, figure, form, shape, physique, build, size, proportions
    View synonyms
  • 3[usually in singular] A basic structure that underlies or supports a system, concept, or text:

    ‘the establishment of conditions provides a frame for interpretation’
    • ‘These terms and concepts provide the frame for his thoughtful analysis.’
    • ‘Nature is a destructive force whose influence provides the frame for human action and its causal consequences.’
    • ‘In turn, adults' choice of code varied by the language frame provided by the classroom teacher or school representative.’
    • ‘With that comes a complete frame of concepts and ideas.’
    • ‘The start of a new year provides a convenient frame for temporal measurement.’
    • ‘The point here is relevance within individual contextual frames.’
    • ‘One prime factor of the failure of the Indian working class movement was that upper caste bourgeoisie who never wanted to change the basic social frame mostly led it.’
    • ‘The social scientist will almost certainly be aiming to place the interpretations that have been elicited into a social scientific frame.’
    • ‘So there's every sign that the system responds within a frame of accountability.’
    • ‘Rather, religious metaphor is a frame through which we represent and understand sport and sportspeople.’
    • ‘The theological mode ceases to provide the overarching frame.’
    • ‘This civil war scenario is offered up merely as a frame to the text, and as such it's almost too interesting.’
    • ‘Their influence provides a frame for human action and its casual consequences.’
    • ‘He says that we need such a policy to provide a frame for our national development strategies and our immigration policies.’
    • ‘We have a frame of political and economic agreements subscribed by the two countries that make any dealing easy and fruitful.’
    • ‘As well, we need to re-think our understanding of time, as the limitations of the nation state as an organizing frame blind us to different temporal rhythms.’
    • ‘I wanted them to think outside the frame of the text.’
    • ‘The notion was of something disposable that provides a frame for perception and the experience of looking.’
    • ‘To me, the ability to feel comfortable with power over the lives of others is not part of life's basic frame.’
    • ‘He likes silence, ‘the perfect music in a way, musicians at best provide a frame, or a context for that,’ and requires it to relax.’
    structure, framework, context
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1technical
    2. 3.2archaic [in singular] The structure, constitution, or nature of someone or something:
      ‘we have in our inward frame various affections’
      • ‘Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin.’
      • ‘It assumed this flesh in the same way that the blood vessels provide a frame for the flesh and carry the blood, yet are not themselves blood.’
      • ‘The werewolf could be a benign individual, trapped within a bestial frame.’
      • ‘Whatever be our inward frame, we are apt to perceive a wonderful congeniality in the world without us.’
      • ‘It distorts our inward frame, and unsettles the adjustments of our minds.’
  • 4Linguistics
    A structural environment within which a class of words or other linguistic units can be correctly used. For example I —— him is a frame for a large class of transitive verbs.

    • ‘Of course specific words and phrases evoke (aspects of) specific frames.’
    • ‘It would be a shame for the only analysis of political rhetoric to be in terms of frames, metaphors and word choices, as interesting as those topics are.’
    • ‘The use of the linguistic frame ‘as A said to B’ is therefore potentially infinitely productive, even if examples are ephemeral, singular, and difficult to collect.’
    • ‘Correct capitalization could help German readers extract the structural frame of a sentence.’
    • ‘Nor does the effect appear to be limited to the RSVP of repeated words in sentence frames.’
    1. 4.1 A feature which marks a transition from one section of discourse to another:
      ‘frames are realized by linguistic items such as ‘well’, ‘right’, and ‘OK’’
      • ‘Use frames such as ‘What if…’ and ‘Wouldn't it be nice if…’ amongst others, and as you play with those thoughts they'll become more familiar and more believable.’
      • ‘Frames, such as OK, So, Well, and Now, uttered with a high-fall intonation contour and preceded and followed by a pause, serve to mark closure of old topics and introduction of new ones.’
    2. 4.2 A section of a discourse separated by a frame:
      ‘pragmatically asides step back from the ongoing interpretative frame’
      • ‘Conversely, interactional difficulties may lead to an unexpected shift in frame and discourse type.’
      • ‘She remarks transitions from one frame to the next, rendering repetitive elements caught from slightly different points of view.’
    3. 4.3 (in semantics) an underlying conceptual structure into which the meanings of a number of related words fit:
      ‘the frame of verbs of perception’
      • ‘Hence, the phonological frame of verbs is a proper subset of the phonological frame of nouns in Dutch.’
      • ‘There are two basic differences, however, between the case frame of verbs of motion and that of verbs of transfer.’
    4. 4.4 A social context determining the interpretation of an utterance:
      ‘an utterance may mean the opposite of what it says if used within a frame of teasing’
      • ‘Conversational humour involves the establishment of a ‘play frame’.’
      • ‘A dialogue, based to an extent on differing interpretations and differing frames for reading situations, has emerged.’
      • ‘In a somewhat joking frame, Mr. Morris quipped, ‘He is skilled at aggravating us and producing tension in the household.’’
      • ‘The ‘play’ frame, like the related frame of ‘humor,’ brackets an encounter, setting it apart from ongoing, more ‘serious’ life.’
      • ‘For example, the utterance ‘Nice shirt’ between two friends will have one meaning in the chatting frame as opposed to the teasing frame.’
  • 5A single complete picture in a series forming a cinema, television, or video film:

    ‘video footage slowed down to 20 frames a second’
    • ‘Moreover, the prose-poem form itself, with its blocklike arrangement of print, mimics a frame of film or a movie screen.’
    • ‘But director Snyder has paced this movie right and the intensity builds from the first frame to the last.’
    • ‘It is a marketing strategy in search of a movie, the promotional campaign for which was in all likelihood decided upon before a single frame of film had been shot.’
    • ‘You can pause the movie on any frame to see that individual picture.’
    • ‘Crisper editing probably would have helped, but the filmmakers apparently were reluctant to lose a single frame of Murphy in makeup.’
    • ‘Even in the final frames of the film, in which there is no dialogue, Moreno's natural acting talent is evident, bringing the film to a strong conclusion.’
    • ‘It is very informative, and Jeck obviously knows every frame of this picture.’
    • ‘It would seem, in fact, that not a single frame of film has been left on the cutting room floor.’
    • ‘Heaven forbid that anyone should have a free second or film frame devoid of musical accompaniment.’
    • ‘At the end of the film, the frame freezes and the lead actors real names and character names appear one at a time.’
    • ‘These still images were edited together digitally, the video edited frame by frame to produce movement and rhythms.’
    • ‘Apparently, the filmmakers realized how incredibly fake their ghouls looked, so they decided to never show them onscreen for more than five frames of film.’
    • ‘Every single beautiful frame of this film is romantically and emotionally charged.’
    • ‘Hell, you've got to know your ending before you start shooting a single frame of film.’
    • ‘The next generation of phones, however, will support 15 frames per second.’
    • ‘Each of the 110,000 frames of film that comprise the movie has to be treated as an individual shot.’
    • ‘If you see a particular frame of a television show a quarter of a second later than your neighbor, no one's the wiser.’
    • ‘But I finished it on a computer that could do sixty frames per second.’
    • ‘Throughout the latter quarter of the 20th century, the iconic image came from frames of video footage.’
    • ‘Not a frame of film is wasted, with each episode launching almost immediately into action.’
    1. 5.1 A single picture in a comic strip.
      • ‘‘They still can be heroes, even without superpowers,’ the Man of Steel tells a crowd of adults and children in the last frame of the comic book’
      • ‘The comic strip ends with a frame featuring an aged Bible John wandering the streets of Glasgow in the present day.’
      • ‘Then, in the comic's final frame, Cathy says, ‘At least we'll always have the prints.’’
      • ‘But Roy would take a single frame from a cartoon or comic strip and turn it into an entire painting.’
    2. 5.2Computing A graphic panel in a display window, especially in a web browser, which encloses a self-contained section of data and permits multiple independent document viewing.
      • ‘Even if users do click on an offer, they're never far from the site, since the new page opens up within the current frame.’
      • ‘If, like most people, you're using a graphical browser, after login you see two frames.’
      • ‘To navigate the review simply click on the section headings in the frame above.’
      • ‘The overall layout of the scroll bars and the way the frames are displayed is very impressive.’
      • ‘Users especially like the idea that the result list is constantly available within the left frame.’
  • 6The triangular structure for positioning the red balls in snooker.

    • ‘This trophy, made of Waterford Crystal and in the shape of a snooker frame triangle, is a new one because the previous cup was sponsored by a tobacco company and their link with sport ended two seasons ago.’
    • ‘If, however, you are using the basic triangular frame, you should place it over the reds as earlier described, and lift the frame slightly off the cloth and carefully move them toward the pink spot.’
    • ‘They began going through the motions of playing snooker, putting the balls in the frame, going off, potting the colours, snookering each other and marking the scores.’
    1. 6.1 A single game of snooker:
      ‘Jones won the first four frames’
      • ‘More than 680 frames of top-flight snooker were played in 47 matches over 12 days in York last year.’
      • ‘Body language experts could have a field day at the Crucible observing players' behaviour between frames.’
      • ‘The couple were back home on Saturday and for club regulars it was an average lunchtime - playing a few frames of snooker, watching the football on Sky and sinking a pint or two.’
      • ‘By the end of the second session, the 2002 world champion was four frames adrift of his opponent.’
      • ‘Hunter then extended his lead to four frames by winning the last of the session with two breaks of 35.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Place (a picture or photograph) in a frame:

    ‘he had had the photo framed’
    • ‘Have them framed in vintage style frames for a striking effect.’
    • ‘Experts agree the original should be kept in an acid-free photo album in the dark while copies of the photograph are framed.’
    • ‘Notably, only a few photographs were framed and hung.’
    • ‘These pictures were framed or tipped into yearbooks, hung throughout the clubhouse of the moment, or shelved in a library.’
    • ‘We need them in and developed, mounted and framed by Friday.’
    • ‘These images were frequently collected and framed by readers.’
    • ‘In one, students calculated how much framing material was required to frame several pictures.’
    • ‘A number of pictures were framed and presented to schools.’
    • ‘Whenever you buy a book or frame a picture for someone else, write a kind note to the recipient on the flap or the back.’
    • ‘That is their main purpose, but saving just one of them to be framed or placed in a memory album/scrapbook will create a lasting souvenir of the occasion.’
    • ‘She frequently hires Tucker to mount and frame art images she finds in publications and on postcards.’
    • ‘My first step was to cut the print into six pieces so each image could be framed individually.’
    • ‘Try writing her a poem, painting a picture, composing a song, framing a picture, washing the dishes for her or simply spending the day in her company.’
    • ‘Anyway, on the way home I found the perfect bid of beading (that's like thin timber) to frame a picture I painted on cardboard.’
    • ‘Emmie framed new pictures of them monthly down the hallway of their house.’
    • ‘Tammy and Greg's wedding picture was framed and hung perfectly on the walls.’
    • ‘She must have been extra special since you framed her picture and put it in your room.’
    • ‘She had already framed a picture of her and Logan dancing and it sat on her desk.’
    • ‘She framed a picture of Marissa and him from when they were small.’
    • ‘Finally, the images are dry-mounted and framed to his specifications.’
    mount, set in a frame
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Surround so as to create a striking or attractive image:
      ‘a short style cut to frame the face’
      • ‘He lay in bed looking out of that window, seeing the bougainvillea frame a picture of two golfers at the fifth tee.’
      • ‘Even the gate is a work of art; the rose-covered metal arbor and upward-arching gate create a circle that frames attractive views.’
      • ‘As soon as she saw the bright, cheerful face, framed by soft blond curls, she giggled.’
      • ‘Her luscious hair hung about her neck and shoulders, framing an attractive face.’
      • ‘Her brown hair fell in silky waves, the curls artfully framing her face.’
      • ‘Moving images, including those framed by car windows, give us the possibility of seeing landscape as variable rather than fixed, as in landscape paintings.’
      • ‘The narrow painted borders create a portal or threshold that frames the interior to give the illusion of deep space, a familiar painting convention.’
      • ‘Her hair was perfectly framing her face and her fit body was tastefully dressed in a sleek black dress.’
      • ‘With a charming face framed by curly hair, she soon became a star.’
      • ‘There, the city is framed by the mountains, but not overwhelmed by them.’
      • ‘The idea was to open and frame attractive views of the historic buildings.’
      • ‘Again, in the background, one can make out a type of building, and the entire picture is framed by many trees, as opposed to the two trees in the previous picture.’
      • ‘At the Music Center, another sculpture by Graham, an open bronze door, frames city hall like a formal portrait.’
      • ‘There are many exquisite details, carved doorways, potted plants framed by shaded windows.’
      • ‘This beautiful, decrepit city is at its most breathtaking at night, when thousands of lights of the houses on the surrounding hills frame and light up the bay.’
      • ‘Shocked, she stops, gathers her robe and advances just a bit, to be framed perfectly in the doorway.’
      • ‘An L-shaped block of yellow on the left nicely frames the page.’
      • ‘Iranian women are known for large eyes framed by thick eyelashes, and dark, shapely eyebrows.’
      • ‘Fake crystal chandeliers sparkled above the stage and the performance space was framed by red valour curtains.’
      • ‘Her violet eyes were framed by long lashes.’
  • 2Formulate (a concept, plan, or system):

    ‘staff have proved invaluable in framing the proposals’
    • ‘What are the arguments and positions needed to formulate and frame the ensuing public policy debate?’
    • ‘We need to remind ourselves in framing our policies that luck, rather than virtue, is one of the great determinants of life.’
    • ‘The major reported sticking point is the manner in which a profit-sharing formula is to be framed.’
    • ‘When the Constitution was framed in 1787, setting out the law of the United States, it involved compromise between North and South and permitted slavery.’
    • ‘No definite plans were framed for areas outside the capital, but the minister indicated the same principle could be extended nationwide if the Dublin experiment succeeds.’
    • ‘Against this backdrop of anarchy and violence, politicians attempting to frame the country's new democracy are floundering.’
    • ‘It is quite another when he is framing his policy as he has to be responsible to the people and, as such, must be realistic.’
    • ‘He and his organisation have clout in framing policy and legislation.’
    • ‘Your input has helped us frame a policy that will enable us to better serve our diverse community of users around the world.’
    • ‘Indeed it has been said, rather unkindly, this scheme was framed especially to benefit Ireland's jockeys.’
    • ‘That's the basis on which we shall frame our policy for the next general election.’
    • ‘The court has asked the Welfare Commissioner to frame a policy of disbursement in two weeks.’
    • ‘This is the first round in framing a recovery plan for fish supplies.’
    • ‘You are not entrusting the new government the responsibility to frame its own policies in our democratic model.’
    • ‘At the same time, European Union foreign ministers agreed there was much still to be done and that all groups must be included in framing a constitution.’
    • ‘Their focus is on framing the public policy agenda rather than creating useful public policy initiatives.’
    • ‘The original treaty and policies were framed to accommodate the concerns of the founding states, particularly France and Germany.’
    • ‘Mr Davern is waiting for the report of the Organic Development Committee, whose recommendations will form the basis for framing policy on organic farming.’
    • ‘As an apolitical forum, it should play a key role in framing agricultural policies.’
    • ‘I have been heavily involved in framing the strategy over the last ten years so this does not signal any change in that.’
    formulate, draw up, plan, draft, map out, sketch out, work out, shape, compose, put together, arrange, form, devise, create, establish, conceive, think up, hatch, originate, orchestrate, engineer, organize, coordinate
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Form or articulate (words):
      ‘he walked out before she could frame a reply’
      • ‘All this is true, of course, but framed in quite an amazingly radical way.’
      • ‘That is why the attack on Britain's rebate has been framed in terms of concern that the poorer EU entrants should not be asked to pay money to one of the richest European nations.’
      • ‘A series of Gallup polls from 1982 to 2001 reveal similar findings (although the question was framed differently).’
      • ‘Charles, perhaps you could frame this in terms of the business issues.’
      • ‘It is true that Perelman did not frame his idea in political and critical terms, and that he may have been surprised to see it appropriated in such a way.’
      • ‘In Bakhtin's view, people frame their speech according to the reactions they hope to produce or the impression they want to make.’
      • ‘The words were not framed in that rhetorical and hopeless way they often are following news of a tragedy.’
      • ‘You would definitely frame your words in your own way and pray to the Lord for me.’
      • ‘Nor does he bother with minor matters: his interest is only in the larger issues, so it pays to frame questions accordingly.’
      • ‘The arguments were framed in a very academic fashion.’
      • ‘He was nevertheless forced to frame his words welcoming the move carefully, to ensure that his political enemies were not given any ammunition they could use against him.’
      • ‘But it is the environmentalists who have been most successful in getting the debate framed in words that suit them.’
      • ‘The debate is framed very differently on the two sides of the Atlantic.’
      • ‘Yet much of the debate over civil liberties in wartime has, to this point, been framed in all-or-nothing terms.’
      • ‘I am not a supporter of the censorship of any voice, but I do believe the dialogue must be framed respectfully.’
      • ‘Instead, you need to frame and word your question precisely to get what you want.’
      • ‘For far too many on the left the issue gets framed as a dispute between civil rights and individual rights, with civil rights having the trump card.’
      • ‘Daniel hesitated, trying to frame his words in the nicest possible way.’
      • ‘Conventional explanations of the high cost of space tend to be framed in terms of the laws of physics.’
      • ‘Arguments framed in terms of fear may easily be represented as irrational and therefore illegitimate in terms of political debate.’
    2. 2.2archaic Make or construct (something) by fitting parts together or in accordance with a plan:
      ‘what immortal hand or eye could frame thy fearful symmetry?’
      • ‘A great number of men join in building a house or ship, in rearing a city, in framing a commonwealth: Why may not several Deities combine in contriving and framing a world?’
      • ‘The Puritans - who sought to frame their lives according to God's Word and were Edwards' spiritual forebears - wrote a great deal about this subject.’
      • ‘Tyger, Tyger, burning bright In the forests of the night; What immortal hand or eye, Could frame thy fearful symmetry?’
      • ‘Sweet boy, thou art too young and too honest to cope with women, who were framed by the Creator to deceive.’
      • ‘If he allows that God framed the universe, why not allow that God manages it?’
  • 3informal Produce false evidence against (an innocent person) so that they appear guilty:

    ‘he claims he was framed’
    • ‘He claims that he was framed and that he was innocent.’
    • ‘David can't tell Keith what he knows about the murder because he doesn't want to tell him that there's been evidence planted that frames Keith.’
    • ‘He is then framed for a murder and is forced to go on the run, being chased by spies and the police.’
    • ‘Nobody will be surprised to learn, I assume, that recent scholarship indicates he was framed.’
    • ‘I cannot believe I've been framed for a crime I didn't commit.’
    • ‘Informers have been caught framing innocent people.’
    • ‘Although it was revealed during the trial that he was a drug smuggler, he was also a gun-obsessed thug who repeatedly claimed the police framed him for violence and sex offences.’
    • ‘He concludes that conspiracy theories about wills and a police attempt to frame Slater were nonsense, but the true killer may never be known.’
    • ‘Soon they are trying to piece together why they were framed and how to escape from their life of imprisonment!’
    • ‘He'd heard it all before - another murder convict claiming he was framed.’
    • ‘As the story is revealed, Bloom begins to develop a need to peel away the veneer surrounding his incarceration, becoming adamant that he has been framed.’
    • ‘He claimed another criminal who ran a cannabis farm with Taylor was behind the killing, but that detectives manipulated evidence to frame him.’
    • ‘Sam had figured out that Brigid, in a plan to frame Thursby, had drawn Archer into the alleyway and killed him with Thursby's weapon.’
    • ‘Is he guilty or has he been framed by radical right-wingers?’
    • ‘You don't know what it's like to be framed for a murder!’
    • ‘The administration is trying to frame a guilty man and lead a lynch mob to execute him.’
    • ‘But the 75-year-old man says the army and police are framing him.’
    • ‘Payne is framed again for a crime he didn't commit.’
    • ‘He later learns that he was framed and unjustly imprisoned.’
    • ‘They framed an innocent guy and sent him to death row for murder.’
    falsely incriminate, fabricate charges against, fabricate evidence against, entrap
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English framian ‘be useful’, of Germanic origin and related to from. The general sense in Middle English, ‘make ready for use’, probably led to frame; it also gave rise to the specific meaning ‘prepare timber for use in building’, later ‘make the wooden parts (framework) of a building’, hence the noun sense ‘structure’( late Middle English).

Pronunciation

frame

/freɪm/