Definition of fox hunting in English:

fox hunting


  • [mass noun] The sport of hunting a fox across country with a pack of hounds by a group of people on foot and horseback, a traditional sport of the English landed gentry.

    • ‘When four Hampshire hunts turned out on Saturday it was hard to believe that the traditional pursuit of fox-hunting had just been banned.’
    • ‘Push through those last items that seem to have been on the government's statute books for months - in particular, the bill to finally outlaw fox-hunting.’
    • ‘If the bill jumps its final hurdles, fox-hunting could be banned in Scotland at a time when it might still be legal in England.’
    • ‘MPs were tonight set to vote overwhelmingly to outlaw fox-hunting, amid claims that many scores of North Yorkshire jobs are at stake.’
    • ‘The Bill makes it an offence to use dogs to hunt wild mammals, effectively ruling out mounted fox-hunting and some other activities such as hare coursing.’
    • ‘The Bill proposes to outlaw stag-hunting and hare-coursing while allowing fox-hunting with hounds to continue under licence.’
    • ‘It is argued that fox-hunting is part of a traditional country way of life.’
    • ‘He said: ‘An awful lot of us do not see anything wrong with fox-hunting but if the law says it must stop then we will have to do what we are told.’’
    • ‘On the other side of the argument, people say that we have no right to kill foxes in the way that we do, and that fox-hunting is both cruel and barbarous.’
    • ‘The campaigners say the rural economy has already been devastated by the foot-and-mouth crisis and claim a ban on fox-hunting would lead to thousands more job losses.’
    • ‘‘I am pleased that they will draw attention to my determination to ban fox-hunting,’ he told the Yorkshire Post.’
    • ‘Yet when fox-hunting was considered a sport, from its inception in the eighteenth century, it was far from an amateurish or cost-free pursuit.’
    • ‘There's also the thousands of people employed indirectly or directly by fox-hunting who would lose their jobs.’
    • ‘The Hunting Act, which outlaws fox-hunting, deer-hunting and hare-coursing with dogs, comes into force on Friday.’
    • ‘Bloodsport enthusiasts have always denied that fox-hunting is inherently cruel.’
    • ‘But the crux of my opposition to fox-hunting is this: the people who do it are enjoying a leisure pastime whose pivot is the violent death of an animal, not for food.’
    • ‘I have presented my opinion on the arguments for fox-hunting.’
    • ‘The ban is due to take effect on February 18 and will end fox-hunting, stag hunting, and hare-coursing with dogs.’
    • ‘In the first of a series of votes, MPs rejected a Lords proposal to allow registered fox-hunting, stag hunting and hare coursing.’
    • ‘The Brigg and Goole MP, who is former North Lincolnshire council leader, said so far he was minded to vote for an amendment to ban fox-hunting completely.’


fox hunting