noun

North american
  • A small biscuit containing a slip of paper with a prediction or motto written on it, served in Chinese restaurants.

    • ‘She would scurry into her shop of Chinese delicacies and come out with my daily fortune cookie.’
    • ‘With my bill, I get a fortune cookie that says, ‘Listen not to vain words of empty tongue.’’
    • ‘I then ate the fortune cookie, and felt much less than fortunate.’
    • ‘The slip of paper inside the fortune cookie I got to choose on Thursday night read: ‘You will soon find the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.’’
    • ‘She served her rice as well, and gave her a fortune cookie.’
    • ‘I decide to take it as an omen, like a fortune cookie in a steak house.’
    • ‘The title sounds like a prediction from a fortune cookie, deliberately so.’
    • ‘I have a slip of paper from a Chinese fortune cookie taped to my computer monitor.’
    • ‘Much of it seems like a cross between reading a Chinese fortune cookie and an Ann Landers column.’
    • ‘It not only was in the tabloids, I think it was in the fortune cookie I ate two weeks ago.’
    • ‘If I'm honest, I just wait for the fortune cookie at the end of the meal.’
    • ‘But that comfort did not come in a fortune cookie and is not always stable and secure.’
    • ‘So I crack open the fortune cookie and you know what it says?’
    • ‘I think you're more interested in the fortune cookie.’
    • ‘A good friend of mine, also a trip director, once got a fortune cookie that told him, ‘Judgment comes with experience.’’
    • ‘He cracks open his fortune cookie and removes the slip of paper.’
    • ‘The president is a riddle wrapped in an enigma inside a Chinese fortune cookie.’
    • ‘I'm probably revealing my own shallowness, but doesn't that philosophy come from a fortune cookie?’
    • ‘‘It's a fortune cookie,’ she told him, picking up her own.’
    • ‘Aren't you going to read your fortune cookie?’

Pronunciation:

fortune cookie

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