Definition of foregoing in English:

foregoing

adjective

formal
  • attributive Just mentioned or stated; preceding.

    ‘the foregoing analysis of the economic class structure’
    • ‘The foregoing analysis showed the importance of rescaling in the reforms of the 1990s.’
    • ‘The foregoing analysis in my view marches with that advanced by my Lord in paragraph 24 and 25 of his judgment, with which I respectfully agree.’
    • ‘The foregoing analysis confirms what the parents of college-age children have known for some time: The real cost of higher education has risen well in excess of the rate at which real incomes have risen.’
    • ‘The foregoing analysis depends, in part, on the correctness of modeling viability differences.’
    • ‘In the light of our foregoing discussion, it is clear that letting deflation happen must not be simply equated to an apathetic resignation before the power of mysterious forces and blind market mechanisms.’
    • ‘The foregoing remarks hardly rise above the level of common sense, but they serve to frame a rather striking historical fact.’
    • ‘The foregoing analysis supports the importance of the witch trials in the history of women, and also reasserts the importance of women in the history of witchcraft.’
    • ‘From the foregoing analysis, several recommendations can be made.’
    • ‘The foregoing analysis of appropriation bills, statutes, and attendant documents explains how the General Assembly of North Carolina came to adopt performance funding.’
    • ‘The foregoing analysis of the historical and physical set-up of Kenya provides the background to the key challenges facing the country as it attempts to incorporate IT into its public school system.’
    • ‘The foregoing discussion, principally concerned with presidential leadership of foreign policy in competition with the US Congress, concentrated on the person of the president.’
    • ‘Moreover, the discussion in the foregoing pages demonstrates that it is erroneous to regard money transfer orders as comprising a single type of transaction.’
    • ‘The foregoing discussion has shown how there are still many features of the law which reflect the primary importance attached by social policy to the formation of family relationships within the framework of marriage.’
    • ‘The foregoing analysis allows us to suppose that our version is of a better quality compared to the revised map presented on the website.’
    • ‘The foregoing analysis of [the book on the table] enabled us to exemplify, and to define, three key grammatical notions: head, complement, and modifier.’
    • ‘The foregoing analyses adopt a comparative notion of reasonableness as a basic or primitive notion.’
    • ‘The foregoing discussion should establish the ambiguous, ambivalent, problematic, yet intriguing position of rhetorical studies within the academy.’
    • ‘The foregoing discussion clearly demonstrates that the German model has been subjected to major forces of change since the late 1990s.’
    • ‘The foregoing analysis is summarised in Table 1.’
    • ‘The foregoing discussions suggest that we can use classical and neoclassical models of location to consider the spatial behaviour of large firms, or firms in environments with good information and low relocation costs.’
    preceding, aforesaid, aforementioned, previously mentioned, earlier, above, above-stated
    View synonyms

noun

the foregoing
formal
  • treated as singular or plural The things just mentioned or stated.

    • ‘The procedures for program change are included in the foregoing, as well as contract renegotiation and amendment in Article V.’
    • ‘People I have spoken to have found the foregoing hard to believe and communist policies have been mentioned more than once.’
    • ‘If the foregoing also sounds familiar in our context - this use of tribal prejudice to inform choice at election time - then we may conclude that the value of evolution has been hopelessly overestimated.’
    • ‘Given the foregoing, we conclude that Section 5 does not violate the First Amendment.’
    • ‘Given the foregoing, I am not entirely sure whether the author of the essay linked to in this post is a little on the kooky side or not.’
    • ‘Well, as I hope you now understand from the foregoing, GDP growth is extremely well correlated with CO2 emissions.’
    • ‘From the foregoing, it is apparent that preparations for the 2006 general elections have began in earnest and our prayer is that they go on smoothly so that we have an election with little or no hurdles at all.’
    • ‘In view of the foregoing, it is clear that the new government will have to place fresh orders for weaponry so that the programme to modernise the armed forces does not become moribund.’
    • ‘I suppose I should say just whom I refer to when I use ‘liberals’ as a noun in the foregoing since I am being so mean to them.’
    • ‘I trust that you will insert the foregoing in your next edition, and that it mat catch the eye of the sanitary authorities.’
    • ‘All of the foregoing, however, can be supported by interpreting the text, history, and structure of the Constitution according to its original meaning.’
    • ‘If, notwithstanding the foregoing, any proceedings are commenced in another jurisdiction, such proceedings shall be referred to ordinary courts of law.’
    • ‘Proceeding from the foregoing, one may single out three strategically stable states of interstate military-political relations.’
    • ‘It is in light of the foregoing that it is very difficult to understand why small Chinese shops are allowed to grow by day when they do not provide any experience and expertise alluded to the above.’
    • ‘That the foregoing were presented in the Declaration as recommendations to the PLC does not diminish their substance, in view of the morally binding force of a resolution issued from a meeting convened at this level.’
    • ‘None of the foregoing should be interpreted as criticism of secondary teachers or officers of the New South Wales Department of Education.’
    • ‘An important implication of the foregoing is that the essential preparation for Christmas is ‘remote, not proximate,’ to recall an ancient distinction.’
    • ‘Hence, if my article was intended as doublespeak, the foregoing is my apology.’
    • ‘As far as I can see, the foregoing constitutes the single most radical criticism of Islam available in the world.’
    • ‘The usual hot summer features ferocious mosquitoes at sunset, gnats, biting nits, mayflies, moths and green flies, and spiders and their webs everywhere, harvesting the foregoing.’

Pronunciation

foregoing

/ˈfɔːɡəʊɪŋ/