Main definitions of forearm in English

: forearm1forearm2

forearm1

noun

  • The part of a person's arm extending from the elbow to the wrist or the fingertips.

    • ‘They flex your elbow and rotate your forearm, so your palms can face up or down.’
    • ‘On her left arm was a gold band that went around her wrist and over her forearm.’
    • ‘A bruise stretching from below her wrist bone almost to her forearm caught his eye.’
    • ‘Then she lists exercises for the shoulders, upper arms, forearms, wrists and fingers.’
    • ‘Abrasions and contusions can be found on the back of the hands, wrists, forearms, and upper arms.’
    • ‘Common sites are wrists, forearms, ankles, abdomen, lower back, and in the mouth.’
    • ‘It was a metal brace, stuck firmly to his arm from the wrist to half his forearm.’
    • ‘An even smaller girl who is seated nearer the front is the next to extend her forearm eagerly.’
    • ‘Boils occur most often on the face, head, neck, forearms and wrists in that order.’
    • ‘Strong fingers, wrists and forearms will aid in this simple, yet necessary task.’
    • ‘Your elbow should have a slightly wider angle, with your forearms and fingertips facing the side wall of the pool.’
    • ‘Maintain a slight bend in your elbows and keep your wrists aligned with your forearms.’
    • ‘Without a word, he pushed my sleeves up to my elbow, until my forearm was exposed.’
    • ‘On one arm, a pair of black metal claws jutted out from the forearm, extending far past the hand.’
    • ‘The most common areas are the inner wrists, the forearms and the ankles.’
    • ‘I lay still, watching him approach, reach out an arm and touch my right forearm with a single finger.’
    • ‘She is lying in her bed with her arms extended upwards, bent at the elbow so her forearms rest on the top of her head.’
    • ‘He slammed down a chair across from me and sat on the edge, his elbows and forearms on his legs and his hands steepled together.’
    • ‘There was a large scrape from the middle of his forearm to his elbow, bits of dirt with the blood.’
    • ‘A section of skin from his thigh was then grafted on to his forearm to reduce visible scarring.’

Pronunciation

forearm

/ˈfɔːrɑːm/

Main definitions of forearm in English

: forearm1forearm2

forearm2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Prepare (someone) in advance for danger, attack, or another undesirable future event.

    ‘within ourselves, we are forearmed against unpleasant possibilities’
    • ‘Thus forearmed, I take my favourite dining companion to the recently opened Glasgow site in the financial district near Central Station.’
    • ‘If somebody could have drawn the other side's attention to Lockley yesterday, they could have been forearmed with it.’
    • ‘I think it's a good thing because if you know you're forewarned, you're forearmed.’
    • ‘Thick skinned, I have bought several items but now after being burnt so many times, I quit, and hope this helps others by forewarning and forearming them with factual information.’
    • ‘The media, forearmed, were there in force and applauded.’
    • ‘Parents need to address this - realise that for a child, forewarned is forearmed.’
    • ‘That is a disadvantage I am powerless to overcome, unless it be by forewarning and forearming those readers who zealously seek the truth.’
    • ‘The amateur, on the other hand, was not forearmed to the same extent.’
    • ‘Being forearmed with this knowledge, is it so outlandish to conclude that a more advanced civilization from another celestial island has come to this one in the past as we plan to do in the future?’
    • ‘He makes confident strides towards the centre of this fascinating maelstrom, forearmed with in-depth knowledge of India's many contradictions and charms.’
    • ‘He plans well, because planning is anticipating and therefore part of his pleasure, and also because his professional training has put him in the habit of forearming by means of foresight.’
    • ‘As if looking out from a watch-tower you give warning to them all, averting dangers and forearming against all the downfalls treacherously plotted by the enemy.’
    • ‘The next time I visited her, forearmed with the knowledge that she'd not opened a window since 1976, and it was like a cross between the Bahamas and an unwashed sauna in her flat, I wore shorts.’
    • ‘Under the guise of informing and forearming an unsuspecting public, such ‘rogue literature’ was a popular genre in Shakespeare's day.’
    • ‘However, once he had claimed victory over Milan, he did not keep his word and forearming himself against retaliation by the Swiss, he occupied the fortress in Bellinzona with 1000 troops.’
    • ‘Every boating publication should forewarn their readers so that they, too, may be forearmed.’
    • ‘By keeping abreast of all cutting-edge innovations, we are forearmed to react quickly to our client's changing demands.’
    • ‘You'll have to be a bit more assertive - and forearmed.’
    • ‘I was fortunate enough to meet him only in the last years of his life, forearmed about his loathing of personal inquiry.’
    • ‘Families/welfare officers would be forearming the men if as a point of duty of care, they ensured all staff were aware of the issue and perhaps also ensured that they were on their local council housing lists.’
    prudent, prescient, foresighted, discerning, judicious, shrewd, percipient, provident, forearmed, politic, canny
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

forearm

/fɔːrˈɑːm/