noun

  • The front part of something, especially a ship.

    • ‘The performance is taut, the tension is intense, and the timpani and trombones are given their rightful place in the fore of the score.’
    • ‘Further, dialogue isn't at the fore of the sound mix, as it should be, especially for a dramatic film.’
    • ‘The questions and issues we place at the fore of our claims of faith are constantly being explored in today's multimedia.’
    • ‘And some of these companies I noticed weren't companies that were exactly at the fore of the business world right now.’
    • ‘The ships heaved on the surface of the sea, huge iron-grey breakers pouring over the brilliant red vessels and the single golden on that gleamed proudly at the fore of the arrowhead.’
    • ‘The world was opened up to trade and industry, with British iron, railways, ships, capital, and expertise in the fore.’
    • ‘The aim is to ensure that the business interests and economic viability of the town are at the fore of any decisions made on future implementation of these plans.’
    • ‘The divine light guides him to the fore, even if it is the fore of the sacrificial altar.’
    • ‘In the '60s, the Beatles were the fore of the counter culture, unpredictable and daring.’
    • ‘His last visit to her home had been bittersweet, but the question that it had raised was now at the fore of his thoughts.’
    • ‘Sonia climbed regally out of her stateroom in the fore of the ship.’
    • ‘Crabs are sun lovers, but can be placed at the fore of taller shade trees.’
    • ‘The vanishing point in painting was a technique used to show perspective in art, i.e., larger objects at the fore with objects getting smaller the further back you go.’
    • ‘Politicians are at the fore of the lawbreakers even though they are required to protect it most because they legislate the various rules and regulations designed to ensure social justice.’
    • ‘The fore of the vessel was dominated by a large sinister-looking cone, covered in windows, circuits, cargobays doors and a several coats of golden paint.’
    • ‘He called on the relevant Ministers to introduce structures that would enable Regional Authorities to be the democratic fore for local input into the health services.’
    • ‘Geologist Ward and astronomer Brownlee are at the fore of this exciting new field and join forces here to illuminate likely scenarios for the end of Earth.’
    • ‘His suspicions against his friend were not at the fore of his thoughts as he'd expected them to be, and he did not even stop to wonder at Isabella's whereabouts.’
    • ‘Doremi was now returning aft, and walked to below the fore of the sterncastle, tears streaming down her face.’
    • ‘As long as economic recovery is at the fore of Japanese domestic politics, METI will continue to dominate the other ministries on external policy.’

Pronunciation:

fore

/fɔː/