Definition of flump in English:

flump

verb

  • 1no object, with adverbial of direction Fall or sit down heavily.

    ‘I flumped back into bed’
    • ‘Emma flumped into a chair at her kitchen counter.’
    • ‘‘I'm not in the mood to pander to you,’ Aidan huffed as he flumped into an orange suede beanbag.’
    • ‘Anywho, I pushed Damien out of my room and flumped back on my mattress.’
    • ‘Julia sighed and flumped on her bed, gathering her knees up to her chin.’
    • ‘Adele clicked off the phone and flumped on the couch next to Joel.’
    • ‘Instead, I arrive home exhausted each afternoon, flump out on the sofa and sleep like a child after her first day at school.’
    • ‘She changed into her Sugar Daddy pajamas and flumped into bed while planning to declare war on the male race.’
    • ‘There were only two chairs in the room when we got there, so I flumped down on Josh.’
    • ‘Sara rolled her eyes and flumped back down on her pillows, pulling her comforter back over her head again.’
    • ‘Aggie lifted her head, coughed up water, took one look at her surroundings, and flumped down.’
    • ‘Jepta sat across from her and Mikhail pulled up a chair, flumping down onto it and facing Navi as best he could, the glare still in his eyes.’
    • ‘He used to have a great flump on 'im: he'd spot a patch of floor that he fancied, then flump right down and stretch out.’
    • ‘‘No,’ Aidan sighed and flumped into a fluffy white beanbag.’
    • ‘As I flumped backwards into the water, expecting a lazy dive, I landed almost on top of two large mantas sailing out from the lagoon.’
    • ‘But Cassidy just turns stomachs every time she so much as flumps into The Laundrette.’
    • ‘She flumped onto the grass, and saw her own crystal tears fall into the mist.’
    sit down, seat oneself, install oneself, plant oneself, ensconce oneself, plump oneself
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object and adverbial of direction Set or throw (something) down heavily.
      ‘Ellie flumped her hands down on her sewing’
      • ‘He paused a moment to light a cigarette and then flumped the bags on the table.’
      • ‘She flumped her heavy army back pack onto the seat beside her letting the weight of her textbooks be supported by the chair.’

noun

  • The action or sound of a heavy fall.

    ‘the rocks hit the ground with a flump’
    • ‘With a soft flump, I flopped on my own bed and yawned.’
    • ‘She heard a soft flump as Danny's arm dropped on to the bed, and she sighed, knowing what he was going to say next.’
    • ‘There was a loud flump as a collection of letters landed on the doormat.’

Origin

Early 17th century: imitative.

Pronunciation

flump

/flʌmp/