Definition of fluid in English:

fluid

noun

  • A substance that has no fixed shape and yields easily to external pressure; a gas or (especially) a liquid:

    ‘body fluids’
    [mass noun] ‘a bottle of cleaning fluid’
    • ‘These faults are presumably acting as pathways for the fluids involved in the formation of gas hydrates.’
    • ‘The bakery owners later gave up their lease after it emerged that the liquid had in fact been body fluids from the two men.’
    • ‘Gold can form soluble compounds with these substances and so the fluids will leach it out of rocks.’
    • ‘I was on a drip because obviously I had no fluids in my body, the only liquid was alcohol.’
    • ‘Kochin's research was on meteorology, gas dynamics and shock waves in compressible fluids.’
    • ‘Deep down within fluids or aquifers volatilization is not an important transport process.’
    • ‘The main benefit from drinking toast water would, however, be the replacement of body fluids.’
    • ‘The fluids that precipitated the veins were a likely source for some of the iron that formed the hematite.’
    • ‘Aim to drink at least half of your daily fluids as water and other hydrating fluids.’
    • ‘Detectives later confirmed that the stains had been caused by body fluids.’
    • ‘I believe that by doing this it helps to drive all the vital fluids around the body.’
    • ‘Intravenous fluids dramatically improved his condition and restored his body weight.’
    • ‘What is known is that it secretes prostatic fluid, one of the five main fluids that make up semen.’
    • ‘It can be used for febrile diseases where the heat is burning up the fluids of the body.’
    • ‘Large volumes of fluids may be infused, and these intravenous fluids should be warmed.’
    • ‘However, Hepatitis B is easily transmitted by contact with blood and other body fluids.’
    • ‘Replacing these lost fluids is essential if the body is to be kept in balance and dehydration avoided.’
    • ‘The main aim of the treatment is to replace the lost fluids and electrolytes in the body.’
    • ‘After condensation, the fluids are drawn back to the areas that are in need of cooling.’
    • ‘He found that more ion-rich pore fluids caused an increase in angle of friction.’
    flowing substance
    liquid, watery substance, moisture, solution, juice, sap
    gas, gaseous substance, vapour
    View synonyms

adjective

  • 1(of a substance) able to flow easily:

    ‘the paint is more fluid than tube watercolours’
    • ‘Melt real dark chocolate in a nonstick pan and beat in just enough full-fat milk for a gloopy, fluid drink.’
    • ‘As if to pour salt into the wound that is the declining sale of fluid milk, sales of soy beverages are soaring.’
    • ‘‘He has achieved this by using increasingly fluid paint, which can be floated over large areas or deployed in a much more linear way,’ says Terry.’
    • ‘We are also putting a lot of emphasis on our merchandising programs - both for ice creams and fluid milk.’
    • ‘Consequently, there may be a layer of fluid water around the chromophore that rearranges upon excitation.’
    • ‘In addition to fluid milk, it markets a wide range of organic dairy products including buttermilk, whipping cream and a dozen kinds of cheese.’
    • ‘Children who are lactose intolerant can often consume fermented milk products like cheese and yogurt as well as lactose-free fluid milk.’
    • ‘Even though they are working in a fluid substance, they have several things in their favour in comparison to swimmers.’
    • ‘The addition of crop oil, surfactant, or fluid fertilizer may improve control of emerged weeds.’
    • ‘Place bowl back over water and stir until chocolate is fluid again and thermometer reads approximately 100 degrees.’
    • ‘Fill the space between tin can and saucepan with water and heat the whole contraption until the glue is fluid.’
    • ‘Miro, Louis and Poons showed the strikingly different effects that could be obtained by pouring a fluid substance down a canvas.’
    • ‘Where was all this water coming from - as much ice as there was in the freezer it still couldn't have made this amount of fluid water surely.’
    • ‘Although adults do not drink a lot of fluid milk in China, an emerging audience may lie in young consumers.’
    • ‘Adding additional calcium to dairy formulations is an option and one currently adopted by processors of all sorts from cheese to ice cream to fluid milk.’
    • ‘It spilled out from her fingers in the form of a fluid silver substance and flooded the man's leg down to the marrow of his bone.’
    • ‘Innovations are not limited to a specific category, with subtle or bold changes evident in products from cultured products to ice cream to fluid milk.’
    • ‘The company pasteurized its first gallon of fluid milk in January 1946 and began ice cream production two years later.’
    • ‘The late afternoon sun shimmers on the Hudson River, creating a blinding surface of fluid silver that coats the dull green.’
    • ‘Material is pumped from the sea bed as a fluid mixture with water and is discharged into the dredger's hoppers where the heavy material rapidly sinks to the bottom.’
    flowing, able to flow easily
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Smoothly elegant or graceful:
      ‘her movements were fluid and beautiful to watch’
      • ‘With its understated elegant designs and fluid lines, the collection should appeal to both traditional and contemporary tastes.’
      • ‘The cinematography was wonderful and the direction was fluid and elegant, surprisingly so considering the subject.’
      • ‘A more weighty tripod will feel more secure and give smoother, more fluid use.’
      • ‘But ever since women became interested in breakdancing, they've brought a new way of moving to it - more angular, graceful and fluid, and more feminine.’
      • ‘Last but not the least is the ‘Bridal Wear’ collection with long, fine, fluid lines and graceful volumes in rich luxurious crepe and silks.’
      • ‘Arlan did indeed remember that dance, of how fluid and graceful she'd felt in his arms.’
      • ‘The colors are rich and saturated, and the signature camera moves are fluid and elegant as usual.’
      • ‘He was so fluid and so graceful and I couldn't tear my eyes away from him, I just couldn't!’
      • ‘It still has an elegant and fluid design, understated rather than flash, but sadly it is missing the distinctive boomerang-shaped rear lights.’
      • ‘Christopher fought with a fluid elegance, every move graceful and balanced.’
      • ‘The English is fairly fluid although not altogether smooth in places.’
      • ‘What was once erratic was now fluid and graceful.’
      • ‘Every movement of the officer's hand was so fluid, so graceful.’
      • ‘With the fluid smoothness that comes only after thousands of repetitions, I mounted the gun when the flight was 40 yards out.’
      • ‘There is an easy elegance here, a fluid readability, and a lucid, completely unaffected, eloquence of one who is at ease with herself.’
      • ‘With quick acceleration and a smooth, fluid stride, Holt can run by most defenders.’
      • ‘Pausing only to throw my BBC notepad and pen to one side, I storm over the human hurdles in what I imagine to be a graceful, fluid study in perfect technique.’
      • ‘Audrey tried her hardest to be fluid, to be graceful, but walking wasn't half so easy as dancing.’
      • ‘The juggling and rope acts were hypnotic; the costume, staging and music are all original and often beautiful; the performances fluid and graceful.’
      • ‘While there are many transitions and sections in each song, this record is so fluid and slippery smooth it often recalls a state of lucid dreaming.’
      free-flowing, flowing, fluent, smooth, effortless, easy, natural, unbroken, uninterrupted, continuous
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Not settled or stable; likely or able to change:
      ‘our plans are still fluid’
      ‘the fluid political situation of the 1930s’
      • ‘The result is a fluid political situation complicated by international relationships, cultural values, and divergent goals.’
      • ‘This is a very fluid political situation in a very unusual state.’
      • ‘But the situation was fluid, and individual commanders had a lot of leeway.’
      • ‘The devolution ‘settlement’ is becoming less settled and more fluid.’
      • ‘The situation is still very fluid, and it's hard to tell whether the U.S. concept of the operation will be successful.’
      • ‘Military developments have overtaken political events, making the situation in Afghanistan dangerously fluid.’
      • ‘But I want everyone to understand, this is a very fluid situation.’
      • ‘Now, you can still kill the enemy, and in fluid situations where someone may or may not be a prisoner, you can still act to defend yourself.’
      • ‘But I want to be careful and say that this is such a fluid situation, Larry.’
      • ‘The situation will be fluid for six months, or at least until Parliament resumes.’
      • ‘But as I noted recently, the situation is now extremely fluid.’
      • ‘So yes, the political situation might be rather fluid, even on Olympus.’
      • ‘Of course, this is only one news report in a highly fluid situation, creating the risk that I may be forced to eat my words before Monday.’
      • ‘We now also have a much more fluid political situation.’
      • ‘Clearly the political situation is very fluid and we can expect the contest for middle NZ to get even more competitive.’
      • ‘In general one of the good effects (see, I do admit there are some) of the Euro will be to make prices in the Eurozone more fluid and hence to settle at a generally lower level in the long run.’
      • ‘I'm just reminded that political definitions are fluid, and shift with the times.’
      • ‘Balanced between neoclassicism and romanticism, the composition appears at once rigidly stable yet inherently fluid.’
      • ‘However, what is impossible within the fixed boundaries of political organisations may be more plausible in the far more fluid world of political ideas.’
      • ‘I believe in a more fluid kind of political change: you throw an idea out there and it travels, and it changes.’
      adaptable, flexible, adjustable, open-ended, open, open to change, changeable, not fixed, not settled, variable, versatile
      fluctuating, changeable, likely to change, subject to change, unsteady, shifting, ever-shifting, mobile, inconstant
      View synonyms
  • 2(of a clutch or coupling) using a liquid to transmit power.

    • ‘Broadly, fluid couplings are of two types - constant and variable speed.’

Origin

Late Middle English (as an adjective): from French fluide or Latin fluidus, from fluere to flow.

Pronunciation:

fluid

/ˈfluːɪd/