Definition of Flora in English:

Flora

proper noun

Roman Mythology
  • The goddess of flowering plants.

Pronunciation:

Flora

/ˈflɔːrə/

Definition of flora in English:

flora

noun

  • 1[mass noun] The plants of a particular region, habitat, or geological period:

    ‘Britain's native flora’
    Compare with fauna
    • ‘The park's current flora is analyzed by habitat and four plant communities are described and discussed.’
    • ‘Lichens thus dominate the Antarctic flora both in terms of species diversity and in terms of total biomass.’
    • ‘If we think of flora of the fells at all it is often to appreciate their beauty.’
    • ‘By altering fauna, aboriginal peoples might indirectly have affected the flora of many regions as well.’
    • ‘He is particularly interested in studying the flora and fauna of the regions they plan to pass through.’
    • ‘The 10-minute show was a window to nature conservation and the need for protecting wild flora and fauna.’
    • ‘Further evidence of its interest and national importance comes from its role as a refuge for wetland flora.’
    • ‘They indicated that Big Savannah was completely treeless and supported an unusually dense and rich herbaceous flora.’
    • ‘Planting your garden with the flora of the region can also link it to the vista.’
    • ‘Also, some plant species may be over-represented in the fossil flora, because they grew on the lake margin.’
    • ‘Bombs, mines, and other war material also contaminated land and water and damaged flora and fauna.’
    • ‘Admire the postcard views of city skyscrapers and the native Western Australian flora in the botanic gardens.’
    • ‘There is also a large number of highly varied indigenous flora species that are characteristic of low-altitude tropical forests.’
    • ‘One key aspect of the project was a rapid ecological evaluation of the park's flora and fauna.’
    • ‘And how are these books documenting the flora actually used by people?’
    • ‘Guidelines on how climbers can help protect flora and fauna have been published.’
    • ‘The flora of this region is diverse and complex.’
    • ‘Wildlife cinematographers and researchers camp out in these houses to study flora and fauna.’
    • ‘Taking up water conservation works will make a fundamental contribution to protecting the flora and fauna in the forest areas.’
    • ‘The first was the incumbent wetland flora with origins in the early Carboniferous.’
    1. 1.1[count noun] A book or other work detailing the plants of a particular region or habitat.
      • ‘The confidence interval lengths are too short to the extent that the compositional differences between these two floras reflect original heterogeneity and not extinction or emigration.’
      • ‘However, most recent floras recognize this as a variable species but no longer consider the varieties worthy of taxonomic recognition.’
      • ‘Modern technology has brought further developments, and the garden's website offers a chance to see the library catalogue online along with a number of floras and monographs (detailed descriptions of plants and plant groups).’
      • ‘It will be an essential reference for those working on Eocene and Tertiary floras, and is a sobering reminder to those of us who work on modern woods how difficult fossil woods are to prepare and identify.’
      • ‘Major floras typically require the integration of information resources that, when in paper form, would exist in many separate volumes of a collection.’
      • ‘The projects to create electronic floras and faunas complement other major international initiatives designed to better understand and manage the world's natural heritage.’
      • ‘Together, such understanding will link across biological fields to explain patterns of genome size variation in development, floras, ecological niches and evolution.’
      • ‘A cross referencing of nomenclature with pertinent floras is included.’
      • ‘Can the babble of field guides, floras, faunas, ID keys, and monographs be coordinated (or, at least, networked)?’
      • ‘We then compared this list to published floras in each borough, and our own research in New York City to compile the final list used in this research.’

Origin

Late 18th century: from Latin flos, flor- flower.

Pronunciation:

flora

/ˈflɔːrə/