Definition of flimsiness in English:

flimsiness

noun

  • See flimsy

    • ‘Flimsiness was no longer fashionable and the voice became more often a vehicle for content, not vice versa.’
    • ‘Some of that picture is true: despite his regal grandeur, Henry was well aware of the flimsiness of the Tudor claim to the throne and was desperate to sire a healthy male heir.’
    • ‘Tension holds everything together, making architecture out of otherwise unsupportable flimsiness.’
    • ‘The gliding motion of the sails, their white flimsiness and quick transformations gave whatever formations they shaped and the places they represented a distinct air of insubstantiality and evanescence.’
    • ‘The very flimsiness of the restraining order is, however, telling, for it seems to indicate a broader tolerance for the rough and ready manner in which men sometimes come on to women.’
    • ‘Mountstuart's flimsiness as a novelistic character is supposed to make the book more realistic by acknowledging that personality is nebulous in itself.’
    • ‘Was this some agent of the Real World trying to alert me to the flimsiness of my constructed consciousness?’
    • ‘This view may have been more tenable in Durkheim's own time than it seems in ours, for in our own times what one might call the flimsiness of many occupational affiliations and of the related employments has become quite apparent.’
    • ‘Suddenly on the bridge this morning I felt the flimsiness of all my substance, but not so much because I'd missed something.’
    • ‘They were so poor, both in the quality of their play and in the flimsiness of their nerve when protecting a lead.’

Pronunciation

flimsiness

/ˈflɪmzɪnəs/