Definition of flatform in English:

flatform

noun

British
  • A flat shoe with a high, thick sole:

    ‘a pair of tan flatforms’
    [as modifier] ‘flatform shoes’
    • ‘But if you must wear a flatform, avoid an over-long trouser or skirt, because you will look as though you are on castors.’
    • ‘"Now we're seeing that platform trend extending to sneakers - or wedge sneakers - and flatform sandals, where the platform is flat, not angled," said Morra.’
    • ‘One of our favorite sightings were elevated sole platforms chez Celine and Chloe that made a case for the enduringly cool edge flatforms add to any look.’
    • ‘Fashion editors sport Marni's oversized necklaces and the chunky flatform shoes that have become so recognisable to those in the know.’
    • ‘From the new flatform to Olympic-inspired footwear, this year, shoes are taking fashionable steps into new territory.’
    • ‘Decadent brocade ensembles have been worn in all their glory, paired with peep toe shoe boots or flatform wedges.’
    • ‘Flatforms give you that extra height without the discomfort of heels.’
    • ‘Bright blues have also hit the runways through flatform heels and clutches.’
    • ‘Flatform pumps finished with iridescent sequins and leather toe caps keep you comfortably sky-high.’
    • ‘Flatforms look best with a mini skirt, shorts, or at least a cropped cigarette pant.’
    • ‘For an office-appropriate look, pair this thick lace sweater top (with a camisole layered underneath) with speckled tweed pants and flatform loafers for a unique, yet chic look.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, she looked glum as she returned to her London hotel in a black maxi dress, black flatform shoes and a plain black baseball cap.’
    • ‘I think the flatform is a shoe exclusively for the young.’
    • ‘Gone are the towering heels of last summer, to be replaced by thick-tongued brogues, clunky flatforms and Birkenstock-style sandals.’

Origin

Early 21st century: blend of flat and platform.

Pronunciation:

flatform

/ˈflatfɔːm/