Main definitions of flamboyant in English

: flamboyant1flamboyant2

flamboyant1

adjective

  • 1(of a person or their behaviour) tending to attract attention because of their exuberance, confidence, and stylishness.

    ‘the band's flamboyant lead singer’
    • ‘A flamboyant personality with a personal touch, most that had never even met him felt that they knew him as a friend.’
    • ‘She was a seriously flamboyant person, in dress and in sport.’
    • ‘Whilst the guitarist needs to suffer for his art more and lose the baseball cap, you only notice this because their singer is a flamboyant individual.’
    • ‘The inmates, mostly flamboyant personalities who lived by their supervillain identities, were stripped of any identity but their prisoner numbers.’
    • ‘Fitting his flamboyant personality, he led the way with his own choice of costume, a rainbow-coloured cope and mitre, which he had designed and made for the occasion.’
    • ‘He's quite flamboyant and I'm the opposite of that.’
    • ‘The other type loud and flamboyant, gregarious and unrestrained, life-loving and vigorous, passionate and strong.’
    • ‘The silent ones often seemed to drive the oldest and slowest cars on the road while the more flamboyant drivers were in cars which seemed to mirror their owner's extravagant character.’
    • ‘So tearing my eyes away, I paid attention to what my flamboyant friend was saying.’
    • ‘He was this wonderful flamboyant person, very funny, and he had lots of energy.’
    • ‘Lee's flamboyant personality and quick, cool, dry wit are trademarks of this great man of musical theatre.’
    • ‘The very popular and flamboyant politician has been leaving everyone in his wake in the competition in recent years and the word is that a major effort will be made to dethrone him this year.’
    • ‘Did the flamboyant personality on television elbow his way into the spotlight, or was he maligned by the newspaper?’
    • ‘He was flamboyant, selfish and wildly misogynist.’
    • ‘Tragically, he died just a few months later in a plane crash and the world of golf lost its most flamboyant personality.’
    • ‘She was embarrassed by what she called my flamboyant behaviour.’
    • ‘The colourful and flamboyant solicitor, famous for his Cuban cigars, quick wit, and genial sense of devilment, attained folk hero status among the showbiz fraternity.’
    • ‘British sculptor, painter, and designer, a flamboyant personality whose flair for self-publicity has helped him become the most famous British artist of his generation.’
    • ‘Sometimes he is wildly flamboyant, sometimes sly and coy.’
    • ‘However, the flamboyant politician, who was made deputy president in 1999 and is reportedly in debt, is remembered by colleagues as being careless with money.’
    ostentatious, exuberant, confident, lively, buoyant, animated, energetic, vibrant, vivacious, extravagant, theatrical, showy, swashbuckling, dashing, rakish
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Bright, colourful, and very noticeable.
      ‘a flamboyant bow tie’
      • ‘The staging just about passes muster and it is enlivened by vivid sets and flamboyant costumes.’
      • ‘The atmosphere was electric as they took to the stage in bright glittering and flamboyant costumes.’
      • ‘For day, wide tweed trousers, a crocheted sweater, a poncho and a hat is a great flamboyant look, or a wrap dress and a bright yellow or green tweed coat with blue tights and fabulous shoes.’
      • ‘Her formula for stimulating warm thoughts of the tropics by applying flamboyant colours to fluid fabrics is paying off.’
      • ‘The piece is larger than life, with flamboyant colours and a constant play of doors opening and closing in front of rich washes of deep lighting hues - lavender, pink and green.’
      • ‘Famous for his flamboyant style, the baron looked drawn and haggard after two nights in police cells.’
      • ‘The seventeenth-century civil wars are a real treat to do with flamboyant plumes, baggy trousers and lots of colour.’
      • ‘Come dressed in a classy yet flamboyant style, we're after freakish glamour.’
      • ‘He was already beginning to develop an idiosyncratic and flamboyant style of dress.’
      • ‘Numerous local schools and organisations took part in the event with colourful floats and flamboyant outfits.’
      • ‘The sleeves and gowns balloon out with layers of lace in an overstated and flamboyant style.’
      • ‘The Beating Bowel Cancer charity is asking men to wear loud, flamboyant ties and women to wear weird and wonderful scarves or ties in exchange for making donations.’
      • ‘The festival also promises colourful and flamboyant floral demonstrations.’
      • ‘She is strong and passionate, with endless, beaming smiles and deep laughs, a love of bright colours, and a flamboyant style that includes a passion for eye-raising hats.’
      • ‘But behind the flamboyant colours is a serious message.’
      • ‘The garish jackets and flamboyant ties were out in force as more than 2,000 people packed York Minster to celebrate his life.’
      • ‘These vibrant colours and flamboyant designs distinguished Art Deco from previous artistic styles, along with its respect for Japanese heritage and its contribution to modernism.’
      • ‘Indian royal ritual and garments with their glittering gold work and flamboyant colours were adopted by Indonesian ruling princes.’
      • ‘Drag is so colourful, so flamboyant, so sellable - that the complicating factors of class, race, and politics seem like, well, a drag.’
      • ‘One TV campaign features a glamorous woman flaunting flamboyant designer clothes in a subway car.’
  • 2Architecture
    Of or denoting a style of French Gothic architecture marked by wavy flame-like tracery and ornate decoration.

    Compare with rayonnant
    • ‘There are many more examples of this type of flamboyant ironwork tracery sufficient to indicate that the style was rooted in the Low Countries.’
    • ‘To house his accumulation of art and curiosities he bought the hôtel of the abbots of Cluny that had been built in the flamboyant Gothic style around 1500.’
    • ‘They rebuilt the old basilica into a grand, very flamboyant Gothic edifice.’
    elaborate, ornate, fancy
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 19th century: from French, literally flaming, blazing, present participle of flamboyer, from flambe a flame.

Pronunciation:

flamboyant

/flamˈbɔɪənt/

Main definitions of flamboyant in English

: flamboyant1flamboyant2

flamboyant2

noun

  • A Madagascan tree with bright red flowers and leaves composed of numerous leaflets, planted as a street tree in the tropics.

    • ‘There are several flamboyants to be found around the city.’
    • ‘Hard landscaped except for an array of flamboyants (a local tropical tree with luxurious orange blossom), the courtyard marks the gradual transition between public and private realms.’
    • ‘They're over now and it seems to be the turn of exotics; bauhinias are out and flamboyants will be flaming across gardens and lighting up streets soon.’
    • ‘This is due to a phenomenon known as allelopathy where there are chemicals in the leaves, flowers and stems of the flamboyant which inhibit the growth of other plants.’
    • ‘Depending on the month of your excursion the yellow poui, the red flamboyant, or the lavender jacaranda trees will be in bloom.’

Origin

Late 19th century: probably a noun use of the French adjective flamboyant blazing (see flamboyant).

Pronunciation:

flamboyant

/flamˈbɔɪənt/