Definition of flagfall in English:

flagfall

noun

  • 1SE Asian Australian A fixed initial charge incurred at the start of a taxi journey, as part of the overall fare.

    ‘passengers were slugged with a $3.60 surcharge on New Year's Eve, on top of the $4.20 flagfall’
    ‘the air-conditioned taxis charge a flagfall of 35 baht’
    • ‘Mr Dow said the government needed to reassess the overall fare structure and reduce the initial flag fall component of fares by $1.50.’
    • ‘Passengers using urban taxis will pay a flag fall charge of HK $22 and HK $1.60 every 200 metres under the new fare table.’
    • ‘The paper considered setting higher flag falls for journeys on Friday and Saturday nights to encourage cab drivers into the city at times when there is often a shortage.’
    • ‘He said the original proposal was Rp 5,700 at flag fall and Rp 2,200 per kilometer to meet demand.’
    • ‘Passengers currently pay HK $1.50 for every 200 metres after the flag fall until the chargeable amount reaches HK $72.50.’
    • ‘Taxis are inexpensive with flag fall of 82 cents and 44 cents per kilometer (per 0.6 miles).’
    • ‘Including fees at the airport and the flag fall a one way trip would be $130.’
    • ‘We would be surprised if two jobs per day, guaranteed for each of 192 school days per year, did not attract some discount from a taxi flag fall rate.’
    • ‘The Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal has recommended increasing the flag fall, but reducing the amount paid for waiting times and distance travelled.’
    • ‘Normal taxis in South Africa are 8 rand per kilometer in a flagged ride, plus 15 rand for "flag fall."’
    • ‘The Decree allows taxi companies to raise the flag fall and increase the charge from Rp 900 per kilometer to Rp 1,300 per kilometer.’
    • ‘Higher "flag falls" should encourage taxi drivers to move off the rank and accept shorter trips.’
    1. 1.1 A fixed charge incurred when making a phone call, regardless of the length of the call.
      ‘their standard calling rates are slightly higher, at 99c per minute with a 40c flagfall’
      mass noun ‘there's no flagfall, no connection fee, no monthly charges, and no lock-in contracts’
      • ‘For the majority of plans, this will be the flagfall plus a one-minute charge.’
      • ‘I buy a $20 prepaid voucher every couple months or so that never expires and the offer I use is 15 cents per minute with no flagfall.’
      • ‘It's a web-only special, offering 10c/min calls with a 25c flagfall.’
      • ‘Standard mobile calls cost 15c per minute - but the real killer here is that there isn't any flagfall whatsoever.’
      • ‘Flagfall will still be charged per call.’
      • ‘The issue resulted in a win for consumers as the company removed flagfall on international roaming.’
      • ‘Telcos will now be forced to prominently display the cost of making a 2 minute call (including flagfall); sending an SMS; and using 1 MB of data.’
      • ‘The excessive bills occurred when the customers used international data roaming and incurred multiple flagfall fees for single data sessions.’
      • ‘It also stopped charging a $0.50 flagfall for each international roaming data session in January this year.’
      • ‘Outside the bonus minutes, calls are charged at 78 cents per minute or part thereof, plus a flagfall of 39 cents.’
  • 2British (in horse racing or motor racing) the start or end of a race, as signified by the lowering of a flag.

    ‘the 16–1 outsider led from flagfall’
    ‘Morris maintained his advantage but Charlie was a fighting second, just a tenth of a second behind at flagfall’
    • ‘Zoladud got favourite backers off to a great start when leading from flagfall in the opening race.’
    • ‘That effort, on his handicap debut, looks all the stronger considering he did best of those up with the pace from flagfall.’
    • ‘After Di Grassi was penalised for a jump start, Danny moved up a position to once again be in 5th position at flagfall.’
    • ‘Come the start of the two miles at Leicester, Foley chose to drop his mount out at flagfall, losing at least 30 lengths in the process.’
    • ‘The mare led from flag to flagfall, never troubled by the persistent challenge of Heather Breeze who she went on to defeat by two lengths.’
    • ‘Sixth and 7th at flagfall were Lopez and Lauda, with the rookie Brazilian driver, Ribeiro, showing good pace to claim the final point.’
    • ‘The gelding was on the back foot from flagfall in the race won by Parsnip Pete, but a return to genuinely testing ground can see him put that disappointment behind him.’
    • ‘But this grey has it to prove and will find leading from flagfall a hard tactic to pull off.’

Origin

Late 19th century: from flag + fall; in flagfall (sense 1) flag refers to a mechanism in a taximeter that was raised to indicate that a taxi was for hire and lowered to activate the taximeter.

Pronunciation

flagfall

/ˈflaɡfɔːl/