Definition of fixed idea in English:

fixed idea

noun

  • another term for idée fixe
    • ‘It is the flip side of another endemic cognitive tendency called ‘confirmation bias’, which leads us to seek or select information that supports our fixed ideas.’
    • ‘You pick friends with the same ‘old’ outlook - people with the same grumbles, self-obsessions, fixed ideas, prejudices, geriatric humour.’
    • ‘Most often it is intentional and can be explained only by the fixed ideas of those who confine themselves to them.’
    • ‘It means disinterestedness, seeing things as they are without dogmatic blinkers, allowing the critical play of the intelligence over fixed ideas and ideologies.’
    • ‘Ego conflicts and fixed ideas should not be encouraged or you end up in an impasse.’
    • ‘Sadly, the postmodern aversion to fixed ideas and beliefs is no match for a determined agenda of the state.’
    • ‘The trouble, of course, is to recognise when one's own reasonable preferences and quaint pet theories (attained through a painstaking process of trial and error) turn into pig-headed fixed ideas, or even dangerous obsessions.’
    • ‘People think political correctness is a set of fixed ideas, but it is more a psychological power strategy designed to enforce whatever dominant fad happens to be blowing through at the moment.’
    • ‘It appeared because artists rejected the fixed ideas of Classical art (inherited from Greece and Rome), which no longer seemed to fit the kind of world that was unfolding.’
    • ‘In our growing science of hypnotism we find the promise of a possibility of replacing old inherent instincts by new suggestions, grafting upon or replacing the inherited fixed ideas.’
    • ‘The point is certainly not to worship technology, but we must also not so fear it that we outlaw scientific research that threatens the fixed ideas of human nature and human destiny propounded by some more timid souls.’
    • ‘And so the picture began to build up of an obstinate, contrary old man, with a fixed idea which no one could dislodge.’
    • ‘One went to hell driven by a fixed idea, another by a self-delusion that shattered him, a third by instincts gone astray, a fourth by a stupidity passing all understanding.’
    • ‘He had been a smart, brave, and dutiful operations officer, but also a quintessential intellocrat with a few fixed ideas and a quiet, at times aloof, personality.’
    • ‘Perhaps fragmentation and entropy are merely the revenge the material world takes on a fixed idea.’
    • ‘This is why it is so dangerous to begin writing with a fixed idea or theme.’
    • ‘It is not a set of fixed ideas and beliefs, more a set of signposts that can help us move on from where we are now.’
    • ‘It was, she said, only by ‘challenging fixed ideas of correct and incorrect behaviour’ that ‘institutionalised hypocrisy’ can be broken down.’
    • ‘He had a fixed idea in his head and no one to tell him the flaws in his defensive plans.’
    • ‘Now is the time for this to happen as we seem to be entering a stage of ‘un-freezing’ and rapid growth with respect to our understanding and approach to many hitherto fixed ideas about the world we live in.’