Definition of firmament in English:

firmament

noun

literary
  • The heavens or sky.

    ‘thunder shakes the firmament’
    figurative ‘one of the great stars in the American golfing firmament’
    • ‘We don't need redwoods and whales at all, not for ordinary life at least, no more than we need Plato, Beethoven, or the stars in the firmament of heaven.’
    • ‘The Roman philosopher Seneca proposed that the auroras were flames slipping through cracks in the heavenly firmament.’
    • ‘Sometimes the lightening forked across the sky like a crack in the dark firmament.’
    • ‘They're coveted by a generation too young to remember the designer's heyday, when she was one of the brightest stars in the fashion firmament, turning out exuberant, fantastical creations.’
    • ‘The final part of the journey explores the ethereal realms of Paradise, where Dante is guided by a ravishing Beatrice through the shimmering, starry firmament to touch the face of God.’
    • ‘The sky was a hard firmament with windows in it - but some time since then it evaporated.’
    • ‘Little space was devoted to the fact that a sporting success-starved nation suddenly had a youthful role model, an ambassador who could put India's name on the tennis firmament.’
    • ‘In the sky, the Pole Star, around which the firmament appears to turn, has been styled the ‘navel of the Heavens'.’
    • ‘We await with interest word of their further plans for this rising star of an upcoming mid-tier production company in the gold mining firmament.’
    the sky, heaven, the blue, the wide blue yonder, the azure, the heavens, the skies
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: via Old French from Latin firmamentum, from firmare ‘fix, settle’.

Pronunciation

firmament

/ˈfəːməm(ə)nt/