Definition of firehouse in English:

firehouse

(also firehall)

noun

North American
  • A fire station.

    • ‘We came upon a firehouse, and as Tara is collecting photos of Ambulances and Firetrucks, we asked the firemen if we could see the trucks.’
    • ‘It takes a special kind of person to choose to do this for a living, or to choose to volunteer their time in the local firehouses.’
    • ‘In 30 seconds, we can be out of the firehouse and in front of a fire.’
    • ‘A number of my uncles followed him into the trade, and I spent part of my youth sliding down poles in firehouses around the city.’
    • ‘In another setting, a firehouse was ordered to take down its largely secular holiday decorations, because neighbors were offended by it.’
    • ‘Handmade posters of the missing are plastered in almost every neighbourhood, and candles and flowers have been placed in front of many of New York's firehouses and police stations.’
    • ‘The development of paid fire forces did erode the distinct identities of different firehouses, creating a larger community of men bound by occupational identity.’
    • ‘New York City has about 8,700 firefighters in more than 200 firehouses.’
    • ‘‘Believe it or not, there are some firehouses and police stations in the country that don't even have computers,’ says Miller.’
    • ‘We need schools and firehouses and roads built here in the United States of America.’
    • ‘Holding photographs of firehouses that are closing and schools in disrepair, they chanted, ‘Where's the jobs?’’
    • ‘The firehouse was full of retired and former members.’
    • ‘And I will never go by a firehouse again without realizing who is in there and what they do for a living and how they take good care of us, you know.’
    • ‘The NYC Fire Museum is located, appropriately enough, in an old firehouse that was converted into a museum.’
    • ‘My travels brought me to middle schools, firehouses, and town halls, which are, of course, perfect backdrops for snap shots and handshakes.’
    • ‘If we are searching for a way to repair the world and live our day-to-day life with meaning, then what better way than to join the local firehouse.’
    • ‘When I was a child, many fire companies were staffed by volunteer groups and the firehouses and their adjacent recreation halls were also centers of social activity.’
    • ‘Once, fire trucks roared out of firehouses on a regular basis; now, a fire company may go days or even weeks without a fire to respond to.’
    • ‘The firehouse, commissioned in 1966, represents the height and turning point of the architect's career.’
    • ‘He significantly increased spending for public safety, police and firehouses - without increasing taxes.’

Pronunciation:

firehouse

/ˈfʌɪəhaʊs/