Definition of find in English:



[with object]
  • 1Discover or perceive by chance or unexpectedly.

    ‘Lindsey looked up to find Niall watching her’
    ‘the remains of a headless body had been found’
    • ‘Steve Beard told the court he arrived home to find Markham and Mr Lovelock asleep.’
    • ‘We had to go up four levels to get to the bikes and arrived to find the others waiting.’
    • ‘She opened her door to get a glass of water and found Wes standing in the hall still.’
    • ‘A chief pilot today paid tribute to a colleague found dead at his home.’
    • ‘I'm fed up with constantly finding you in the hallway sifting through the letters.’
    • ‘Vanessa returned home to find Cilla watching television in the living room.’
    • ‘She alerted police, but when they arrived they found his blue Toyota Seleca empty and bloodstained.’
    • ‘Such structures are dotted all over the island and can be found in the most unexpected locations.’
    • ‘A Spanish cannon found off the coast of Sligo has been unveiled in the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin.’
    • ‘The bodies, which were found on Sunday, had been placed in bin bags in an alley.’
    • ‘The chances of finding the Thai Millennium coins in your change are very small.’
    • ‘Sonia raised the alarm on Monday when she arrived for work and found no one there.’
    • ‘Detectives said that the body had been found in plastic bags which had been wrapped in a quilt cover.’
    • ‘How would you rate the chances of finding something good to eat at 6pm on a Sunday in a small village?’
    • ‘When the search party returned they found Brush in the kitchen raiding the fridge.’
    • ‘I arrived to find the First Minister on his knees shredding box upon box of documents.’
    • ‘We land to find that Nathan and Nat are already up the mountain on another flight.’
    • ‘The fire was contained in the living room where the man was found dead by police.’
    • ‘As I walked into the room I looked around to find Mark watching me intently.’
    • ‘Just over an hour later a Garda knocked on their trailer door to tell them a man's body had been found nearby.’
    discover, become aware, realize, observe, notice, note, perceive, learn, detect
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Discover after a deliberate search.
      ‘I can't find my keys’
      ‘the sailor and his crew were found safe and well last night’
      • ‘Wolf strained his eyes a little but finally found who John was pointing at.’
      • ‘Apparently this is even better, as it means they'll easily find somewhere to park.’
      • ‘She turned the T.V. on and started flicking through channels, not finding anything good to watch.’
      • ‘A domain name is your internet dot com address, it's how people find you on the web.’
      • ‘She is offering a reward to the person who finds him.’
      • ‘Finally I pieced it all together in my mind and went about the process of finding everything I needed.’
      • ‘We are in the process of finding a new FBI director.’
      • ‘When you arrive at your destination find a cool shady place and keep the cool box there.’
      • ‘More bodies may yet be found, in what ranks as the UK's most serious accident at work in many years.’
      • ‘A €150 reward is available for the person who finds him.’
      • ‘They said it was a drug search, but they found nothing and damaged everything.’
      • ‘As the hunt for Smith extends into a second year what are the chances he will be found?’
      • ‘The couple still send their daughter text messages in the hope of receiving a reply, but police have now warned there is little chance of finding her alive.’
      • ‘Each answer can be found by searching on the Web, or digging deep in your mind.’
      • ‘If he could land, he'd stand a better chance of being found in the jet than lying in the desert.’
      • ‘With his accomplices he then moved on to Jean and Adrian's bedroom where he found the safe and its key.’
      • ‘We could always find something to watch, even if it was just old repeats of Changing Rooms or Time Team.’
      • ‘She figured that the next best thing for her to do would be to find a phone and call Alexia.’
      • ‘With this many choices, nobody should ever have a problem finding something to watch!’
      • ‘Adams immediately telephoned the police but when officers searched the area they found nothing.’
      locate, spot, pinpoint, unearth, obtain, detect, put one's finger on
      retrieve, recover, get back, regain, repossess, recoup, recuperate, reclaim
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2find oneself Discover oneself to be in a particular situation.
      ‘phobia sufferers often find themselves virtual prisoners in their own home’
      • ‘He tells them often about the privileged situation they have found themselves in.’
      • ‘I find myself very much in agreement with the underlying principles of the bill.’
      • ‘She suddenly found herself alone on Friday nights watching sappy movies and crying her eyes out.’
      • ‘In 1999, he found himself at the heart of Government when he was invited to cater for an Anglo-Italian summit.’
      • ‘A series of jobs followed, until, inexorably, he found himself back where he started, behind the counter at a Chinese takeaway.’
      • ‘Have you ever found yourself in a situation that embarrassed you and it was not by any means your fault?’
      • ‘That is a situation Chorley have found themselves in many times over the last couple of years.’
      • ‘Mr Whaley, however, insisted he had just done what anyone else would have if they had found themselves in that situation.’
      • ‘Mr Parkin said another problem was that officers now found themselves in more aggressive situations.’
      • ‘Over the past few months, I've found myself in some tricky situations because of email.’
      • ‘How do you think that you would act if you found yourself in a situation where your wife/husband was having an affair repeatedly?’
      • ‘Mum perches on the edge of Thomas's bed and laughs at the outrageous situation we've found ourselves in.’
      • ‘They misread the situation and found themselves, along with others who did so, excommunicated by the rest of the world.’
      • ‘Of course, there is much anger and confusion, suspicion and mistrust among fans as to why the club has found itself in this do-or-die situation.’
      • ‘If they didn't buy all those fancy things, they wouldn't find themselves on the verge of bankruptcy.’
      • ‘At age 14, she found herself a national and international heroine, and graced the covers of Sports Illustrated and Newsweek Magazine.’
      • ‘Mum Julie says that if her daughter had known where to go for advice she might not have found herself in this situation.’
      • ‘In this situation, parody finds itself without a vocation; it has lived, and that strange new thing pastiche comes to take its place.’
      • ‘He did however win some support in his retort to one opponent ‘when you've found yourself in the same situation as me, then we can argue over this’.’
      • ‘Although she was lucky not to have been separated from her son, Noreen was shocked by the situation they found themselves in.’
    3. 1.3 Succeed in obtaining (something)
      ‘he's still struggling to find the money for the trip’
      • ‘One way for young writers to succeed is to find new angles and ways to treat the same theme.’
      • ‘"We want people to ultimately find comfort in the songs, " says Gustafson.’
      • ‘She also finds time to record a documentary about the people within her town.’
      • ‘The second quarter drew a total blank on the scoreboard as neither side succeeded in finding the range against tight marking defenders.’
      • ‘If he did decide to emigrate, would he actually find happiness elsewhere?’
      • ‘People often find their inspiration from utterly mundane things.’
      • ‘It was definitely a challenge to find enough time to train, race, and work on my thesis.’
      • ‘Despite her increasingly demanding schedule, Samantha insisted she still finds time for herself.’
      • ‘Some CEOs seek counseling; others find solace in those closer to the office.’
      • ‘Football has given the world's poor a chance to succeed and find a place in the sun.’
      • ‘Some find solace in campaigning and others want nothing to do with it.’
      • ‘While work keeps her busy, she nevertheless finds time to surf the net.’
      • ‘Outside work, Maxine also finds the time to help run a business club and enjoys aerobics and swimming.’
      • ‘For whatever reason, I still did not find comfort in his arms.’
      • ‘We have tried, in fact, to find a diplomatic way out that would achieve the same objectives without going to war.’
      • ‘Those who do not expect to succeed can always find an excuse to cover their faults.’
      • ‘They could both find temporary solace, but they'd feel awkward and distant afterwards.’
      • ‘They still haven't found enough money to pay the people who worked for them full-time.’
      • ‘Dolly comes to the countryside to regain her stability and find happiness with her kids.’
      • ‘He ran over to her and told her first thing to hide and find shelter.’
      obtain, acquire, get, procure, come by, secure, gain, earn, achieve, attain, lay hold of, come to have, win
      View synonyms
    4. 1.4 Summon up (a quality, especially courage) with an effort.
      ‘I found the courage to speak’
      • ‘It's hard to find the will to carry on sometimes.’
      • ‘He finds just enough courage to annoy Billy Jack and get his throat crushed in an awesome display of Billy Jack's prowess in the martial arts.’
      • ‘Amid her grief she found the strength to organise a support group for the bereaved partners.’
      • ‘Becoming motivated to overcome the fears of change allows you to find the courage to succeed.’
      • ‘When eventually the necessary courage can be found, the car's ready to respond.’
      summon, summon up, gather, muster, muster up, screw up, command, call up, rally
      View synonyms
    5. 1.5no object (of hunters or hounds) discover game, especially a fox.
      ‘Lady Montego heard the new halloo—they had found’
      • ‘Hounds soon found at Red Deer Plantation.’
      • ‘Hounds moved off to draw Pinner Wood, where they found and went away across Hallows Farm, down Mapley and ran swiftly to Lannersmead, where he went to ground.’
      • ‘This means that when some hounds are dragging or have found, the rest either never get to them or run in straggled batches.’
  • 2Identify (something) as being present.

    ‘vitamin B12 is found in dairy products’
    ‘a rare species found only in the Italian Alps’
    • ‘Such pollutants may often be found at higher levels indoors.’
    • ‘For their first few million years or so, whales could only be found off the coast of Pakistan.’
    • ‘Folic acid is found in leafy greens, organ meats, oranges, legumes, and whole grains.’
    • ‘When Horn performs factor analysis on a battery of tests that cover a wide range of mental abilities, he finds not one factor but as many as 10.’
    • ‘This bird can be found all across Canada.’
    • ‘However, geochronological evidence for such processes has not been found yet.’
    • ‘He's developed an unexpected habit of scoring goals and that is a priceless quality to be found in a midfielder.’
    • ‘Also, the high placebo response rate made finding a statistical difference almost impossible.’
    • ‘Different conductors will always find different qualities in the music of any composer.’
    • ‘There are over one hundred bird species found here which are not present in the nearby Serengeti.’
    be present, occur, exist, be met with, be existent, appear, show itself, manifest itself, be
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 Discover or experience to be the case.
      with object and infinitive ‘the majority of staff find the magazine to be informative and useful’
      with clause ‘she found that none of the local nursery schools had an available slot’
      • ‘You will likely find that different user constituencies have very different needs and goals.’
      • ‘Well, we find also that air quality has an impact on the size of the raindrops.’
      • ‘Overall, visitors to Atlanta will find it to be a pleasant and exciting travel destination.’
      • ‘It was a great surprise to buy a copy by chance and find the Evening Press is now lively and informative.’
      • ‘So it is unexpected to find her new novel set in Victorian times and concerned with a music-hall act.’
      • ‘And people often find these jobs have no less pressure than the City, so what's the point?’
      • ‘He's also found that the people he's met here remind him greatly of those he knew back home.’
      • ‘She found to her dismay that no native Indian fish had been mentioned in any of them.’
      • ‘When she did return at last, she found to her dismay, that they had moved away.’
      • ‘When James I succeeded Elizabeth, he found his new kingdom at war with Spain in support of the Dutch.’
      • ‘All of them, he finds, had an ability to create or adopt new technology faster and better than their peers.’
      • ‘Upon waking, I found that I had kicked all the blankets off and was covered in sweat.’
      • ‘As Dickie found to his dismay, the internet has changed all that.’
    2. 2.2 Ascertain by study, calculation, or inquiry.
      ‘the class are encouraged to find their own solutions to problems’
      • ‘The researchers found a solution that is not seen every day.’
      • ‘Now researchers are finding that the land of Nod may be especially difficult to reach for women.’
      • ‘Researchers found a simple solution that can double the shelf life of proteas and can especially benefit the export market.’
      • ‘My own study of Van Diemen's Land finds that this objective was largely realised.’
      • ‘A small study found this herb helpful in easing menopausal symptoms, including sexual difficulties.’
      • ‘Recent studies found that acidic solutions could increase the flow throughout the stems after 40 min of flushing.’
      • ‘Drinking adequate amounts of water has been found to have various benefits.’
      • ‘ESA's Huygens probe, arriving at Titan in 2005, will help find answers.’
      • ‘In addition, oestrogen has been found to improve quality of life in the short term.’
      • ‘The survey also finds a high correlation between overcrowding and incidents of fighting between students.’
      discover, think of, invent, come up with, hit on, turn up, bring to light, uncover, unearth, ferret out
      View synonyms
    3. 2.3find oneself Discover the fundamental truths about one's own character and identity.
      • ‘I didn't need a semester abroad to meet new people and ‘find myself.’’
      • ‘In the time shortly after her revelation she not only ‘found herself’ she also found out who her true friends were.’
    4. 2.4with object and complement Experience or regard (something) in a specified way.
      ‘both men found it difficult to put ideas into words’
      • ‘I still couldn't come to grips with him being so different, but I found his differences interesting.’
      • ‘There was no particular aspect of the course she found appealing; she simply enrolled.’
      • ‘I don't know what they find so amusing about that exactly.’
      • ‘Many couples find it invaluable to have one or two people taking care of everything.’
      • ‘They call me "creepy quiet guy", which I find amusing.’
      • ‘Yet while watching it, I didn't find it as funny as expected.’
      • ‘Many couples find it hard to take the time to talk together properly.’
      • ‘I think the University certainly has the right, and sometimes the moral obligation, to speak out against speech that it finds offensive.’
      • ‘Within hours of joining, she found the job easy and decided to attend work daily.’
      • ‘Now don't you just find that fascinating?’
      • ‘Ms Reed is hoping that once she has graduated she will be able to find a job as interesting.’
      • ‘Days slipped by, and Rusty found it easier to wake up each day.’
      • ‘People find it very amusing to make fun of his stupidity.’
      • ‘Doctors and scientists find it almost impossible to write consent forms for research that most patients can understand.’
      • ‘Yes, this is a completely useless story, but I found it amusing.’
      • ‘Dare I ask what it is you find most objectionable about this socialist paradise?’
      • ‘Perhaps someday he will share with us what he finds appealing about the idea.’
      • ‘Also, researchers find this tool easy to use and effective in gaining quick rapport with local people.’
      consider, think, believe to be, hold to be, feel to be, look on as, view as, see as, take to be, take for, judge, deem, gauge, rate, regard as, reckon, suppose, account, interpret as, esteem
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    5. 2.5Law (of a court) officially declare to be the case.
      with object and complement ‘he was found guilty of speeding’
      with clause ‘the court found that a police lab expert had fabricated evidence’
      • ‘Accordingly, the court finds that the defendant owes the full amount to the plaintiff.’
      • ‘The Supreme Court found that there was a duty of care owed by all but one of the particular defendants.’
      • ‘There is no way on the material that the court could find that the defendants were the cause of the loss of value.’
      • ‘The tribunal found one of the three charges proved and ordered that Mr Baker be reprimanded.’
      • ‘The jury at Glasgow High Court found him not guilty of two other charges of abusing a third boy and a young girl.’
      • ‘He denied the rape when he appeared at Luton Crown Court but was found guilty and sentenced to seven years on Monday.’
      • ‘The Court finds the plaintiffs and their children were wrongfully evicted and they are entitled to whatever damages they suffered as a result.’
      • ‘This section applies if a court finds an adult guilty of an indictable offence.’
      • ‘Thus a crown court which finds that the police have acted in contravention of the Convention as regards a defendant in a criminal trial has no power to award damages to the defendant.’
      • ‘Hayes denied knowingly importing drugs but a jury at Chelmsford Crown Court found him guilty.’
      judge, adjudge, adjudicate, deem, rule, hold, consider, count, rate, reckon, see as
      View synonyms
  • 3Reach or arrive at by a natural or normal process.

    ‘water finds its own level’
    • ‘The various species and cultivars have found their way into a dizzying array of utilizations.’
    • ‘The problem isn't that the movie spends 90 minutes marinating in bad taste, but that so many of the desperate jabs at humor fail to find their mark.’
    • ‘Though modern conveniences have found their way into the Inuit way of life, the story still seems relevant.’
    • ‘Like love, friendship finds its own natural level, I think.’
    • ‘In democracy, Christianity finds its most ‘natural’ social form.’
    • ‘Despite this, some ritual European plants have already found their way into mainstream medicine.’
    • ‘The water levels for the cisterns for each commodity will find a common level.’
    • ‘English words have found their way into most of the traditional languages spoken by Nigerian Americans.’
    • ‘Thriving in hot dry climates, the aloe vera plant has found a natural habitat on Shay's farm.’
    • ‘Perhaps, too, the thesis came too early to compete against the certainties of the 1960s, and finds a more natural place today.’
    • ‘These specimens found their way into mine captains' collections or were sold to mineral collectors and dealers.’
    • ‘In recent years, many European sports have also found their way into Tajikistan.’
    • ‘In Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand, Catholic education has found a natural place in various pluralist and multi-choice contexts.’
    • ‘These technologies soon found their way into petroleum refineries and chemical plants.’
    • ‘The nylon fibers have also found their way into the concrete industry.’
    • ‘It's really no huge surprise that advertisements eventually found their way into video games.’
    • ‘Like water it finds the broad and easy path, the lowest point.’
    • ‘These features of American and English lyrics have also found their way into German rock.’
    • ‘Once again, images of Katie found their way into his head and no matter how hard he tried, he couldn't make them go away.’
    • ‘Many Pagan elements have found their way into other religions' rituals.’
    1. 3.1find one's way Reach one's destination, typically without first knowing how to get there.
      ‘she'll never find her way to the house on her own’
      • ‘They eventually found their way to high ground with just what they were wearing.’
      • ‘Joe's ears buzzed as if two angry bees found their way into them.’
      • ‘Unusually, they had found their way to the north bank of the Humber, possibly through trade with the East Yorkshire Parisi tribe.’
      • ‘Using this light, the two women found their way into the pyramid area.’
      • ‘We wandered around downtown and found our way to the red-light district.’
      • ‘Most of them found their way into schools and abandoned houses in the town.’
      • ‘Soon, the trio had found their way into a dark conference room where Robert and Dan were standing at the far end of a long table.’
      • ‘We found our way to the room, went in and sat down.’
      • ‘Turning her head she searched the room again, praying that Jabin or Mitsos had found their way into the inn.’
      • ‘So, taking the few things he could call his own, he found his way to a traveling circus that would have him.’
      • ‘Eventually, they found their way to Britain and lived as refugees.’
      • ‘Me and Chris wandered aimlessly, found our way to Claire's house, went in while they were out, and ate their food.’
      • ‘I found my way to Liam McFaul, the RSPB (Royal Society for the Protection Of Birds) warden, by asking a string of his relatives how to get to his house.’
      • ‘Local kids were quickest, though, and had found their way into the cave and removed some pots.’
      • ‘Other people gradually found their way to this venue.’
      • ‘And so Raquel and I parted company, she hopped on to a number 22 bus toward Harbor View and I found my way to the number 70 and 75 bus terminus.’
      • ‘We were trying to run but we couldn't breathe or see, I don't know how I found my way to the hatch.’
      • ‘They somehow found their way to Sydney and sought out help from the city's Afghan / Iranian communities.’
      • ‘About an eighth of our audience had also found their way to the pub.’
      • ‘Yesterday as planned we hired a van, drove to Perth through the blizzards and found our way to McCash's Country Store.’
    2. 3.2 (of a letter) reach (someone).
      • ‘I pray that this letter finds you in good health and I hope that your response comes back in time.’
      • ‘If this letter finds you in time, he will be leaving the port on September 20, 1893, at eight in the evening.’
      • ‘I'd love to contact this girl because she was really sweet and I hope this letter will find her.’
      • ‘I hope that this letter finds you in good spirits.’
      • ‘I hope this letter finds you well and in good health, and the enclosed necklace will keep you from harm that isn't inevitable.’
      • ‘I hope this letter finds you happy and in good health.’
      • ‘Dear Husband, Hoping this letter finds you better than it leaves us.’
      • ‘I hope this letter finds you exceptionally fine.’
      • ‘That's all I have to say and I hope this letter finds you in good health.’
    3. 3.3archaic Reach the understanding or conscience of.
      ‘the books of which I have been speaking found me and taught me’


  • 1A discovery of something valuable, typically something of archaeological interest.

    ‘he made his most spectacular finds in the Valley of the Kings’
    • ‘Ginny, an interior designer who has helped Carole furnish both of her homes, is always on the prowl for interesting finds.’
    • ‘Lots of interesting finds in those boxes, some of which caused me to wonder, ‘Why the hell did I keep that?’’
    • ‘Display cases below include goods sold in the shops and finds from excavations in the area.’
    • ‘Finds from the Roman bath excavations are displayed in their original setting.’
    • ‘Wiltshire's rich history has led to numerous interesting finds being unearthed in recent years.’
    • ‘This is a wonderful white burgundy, and a real find.’
    • ‘Valuable finds can turn up in the most unlikely of places.’
    • ‘On display will be archaeological finds including coins and bottles as well as metal detecting trade stands.’
    • ‘For the creationist, the new fossil find is no problem at all.’
    • ‘Club secretary Chris Fenn was called to the site, and agreed the finds were of major archaeological significance.’
    • ‘Art expert Shirley Graham at Leeds City Art Gallery said the cache was a valuable find.’
    • ‘I'm hoping we might come across some interesting finds like coins but we haven't discovered anything like that yet.’
    • ‘IT'S not the sort of place you might think of visiting, but what an interesting find.’
    • ‘Analysis has shown that the avenue was heavily trampled by prehistoric feet, and archaeologists have unearthed numerous finds along its edge.’
    • ‘The archaeological finds of pottery enable us to establish trade routes and transactions between various towns and regions.’
    • ‘Since taking up metal detecting as a hobby Clacton bus driver Terry Field has made a few interesting finds but nothing major.’
    • ‘But if you like rustic villages and unspoilt beaches, Corsica's a real find.’
    • ‘Monthly tastings offer the enthusiast a serious forum in which to learn more about the subject, while discovering interesting new finds.’
    • ‘Like so many celebrated archaeological finds, the discovery of his bones was an accident, pure and simple.’
    • ‘Often in the history of evolutionary theory, early preliminary reports of new fossil finds are over-optimistic.’
    discovery, acquisition, asset
    good buy, bargain
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A person who is discovered to be useful or interesting in some way.
      ‘Ted had turned out to be a real find’
      • ‘Emile Hirsch is the protagonist (and quite a find, a teenager coming out of nowhere to dominate the movie).’
      • ‘He's truly a special find, but all of his advantages are cancelled out by his over-caring nature.’
      • ‘But the real acting finds here are Jonathan Jackson and Katharine Isabelle.’
      • ‘Musa Smith and Onterrio Smith intrigue more than a few teams and could end up being the real finds in this year's crop.’
      • ‘Anna was a surprising find as Sieglinde, an attractive woman with a fine soprano voice.’
      • ‘Jones sincerely believed that everything was worthy of being architecture: he was a rare find.’
      • ‘Rookie of the year Evgeni Nabokov, 26, was a real find.’
      paragon, gem, angel, nonpareil
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2Hunting The finding of a fox.


  • all found

    • dated (of an employee's wages) with board and lodging provided free.

      ‘your wages would be five shillings all found’
      • ‘Their pay will be 35s weekly, all found.’
      • ‘It's the chance of a lifetime and we don't have to pay anything - all found.’
  • find favour

    • Be liked or prove acceptable.

      ‘the ballets did not find favour with the public’
      • ‘Asian vegetables have found favour with Australian chefs and gardeners alike because not only do they taste fantastic, but they are incredibly quick and easy to grow.’
      • ‘This meant that unless the initiatives being pursued found favour with enough male leaders, they could be crushed before they were ever presented to the membership for approval.’
      • ‘However researchers also found that although the concept of organic farmed fish found favour with some focus groups, it met resistance from committed organic shoppers.’
      • ‘This model's off-road abilities quickly found favour, notably with rural communities, postal services and telephone and electricity utilities across continental Europe.’
      • ‘Despite intimating that covert CIA involvement in 1952 ultimately directed Vietnam down the path towards war, the film found favour with American critics.’
      • ‘The Autumn Show, which is now the biggest of its type in Europe, found favour with the judges, who awarded 22 Premier Awards to the horticultural trade exhibitors.’
      • ‘Among the advertisements that found favour with the judges was the campaign for the Heineken Green Energy Festival, which took place over the May Bank Holiday weekend in Dublin.’
      • ‘Cosmetic dentistry has now found favour among the beauty conscious, especially those who know that a presentable set of teeth is the secret behind a good smile.’
      • ‘If cosmetic, commercial reality has found favour, spare a thought for those playwrights who have taken the people's idiom and heightened it with poetic overtones.’
      • ‘She has found favour not just with Irish audiences but with audiences throughout Britain, Europe, Japan, China, the US and Australia.’
  • find one's feet

    • 1Stand up and become able to walk.

      • ‘Brooke climbed to her feet once she found her feet again, and gave Adam an annoyed look of her own.’
      • ‘Azure stood up, finding her feet at last, and grabbed the sword almost as an afterthought.’
      • ‘He began to rise from the couch when Zoë found her feet and began running towards her home.’
      1. 1.1Become confident or successful in a particular field or activity.
        ‘it was in Germany that Kennedy found his feet as a performer’
        • ‘There was little in United's early play to alter that view, even if Norwich were, understandably, content to do just a containing job while they found their feet.’
        • ‘Hardly the man, you'd have thought, to be charged with helping small farmers reeling from the effects of foot and mouth begin to find their feet again.’
        • ‘Murphy continued that all went well with her class of 27 new pupils that morning; that they had all settled well and found their feet quite quickly.’
        • ‘Gradually they were able to find their feet and get a good start in life.’
        • ‘Staff and members have quickly found their feet since the facility opened in January.’
        • ‘Nonetheless, few were convinced markets across the globe had found their feet.’
        • ‘McGarrity's win was far from straight-forward, as the driver was still finding his feet in the impeccably prepared new shape Yellow Subaru Impreza.’
        • ‘His father's father owned a general goods store where immigrants who had just landed in Ellis Island used to stay until they found their feet.’
        • ‘Heworth started slowly but eventually found their feet with skipper Gareth Watson also crossing and Potter adding goals for a 24-4 interval lead.’
        • ‘I found my feet fairly well straight away as I love any ball game.’
        adapt, become accustomed, adjust, get used, become acclimatized, orient oneself, habituate oneself, assimilate
        View synonyms
  • find God

    • Experience a religious conversion or awakening.

      • ‘Churches exercising a Good Samaritan Strategy were committed to finding God in contemporary society.’
      • ‘If we find ourselves by getting to know who we are, we will have little difficulty in finding God, and in letting Him find us.’
      • ‘Every individual should try through the spiritual exercise of practising Sufism to reach God and to find God.’
      • ‘The most die-hard atheist or skeptic may suddenly find God when faced with extreme suffering or danger.’
      • ‘He had done so in the mistaken belief that by living a solitary existence, far from the religious confusion of his day, he might find God.’
      • ‘And in the moment that she utters that prayer, she believes that she finds God.’
      • ‘After his father died on the day Pearl Harbor was bombed, he considered going to college, but after a car wreck which caused him to have a near-death experience, he found God.’
      • ‘If people want to find God or religion, it is something they ought to be able to do themselves, and should not be pushed or hassled into it.’
      • ‘Sprung from the Catholic ghetto, however good that may have been in my spiritual formation, I found God now at work, revealed, known everywhere.’
      • ‘Millions have found God this way, in the silent corner of their room, because they dared to ask God, and God sent them a book like this through someone who loves them and has been praying for them.’
  • find it in one's heart to do something

    • Allow or force oneself to do something.

      ‘Seb could not find it in his heart to dislike Plunkett’
      • ‘I wish you could have found it in your heart to sit down with me and discuss this instead of airing our dirty laundry in public as you have done in the past.’
      • ‘Now the 48-year-old mum is hoping someone, somewhere will find it in their heart to give it back.’
      • ‘I hope you find it in your heart to let people know about this.’
      • ‘But I only hope that people will find it in their heart to forgive me for that grievous mistake on that occasion.’
      • ‘For the life of me, I can't find it in my heart to loathe rabbits the way I do other pests like possums and stoats.’
      • ‘I was worried but couldn't find it in my heart to ask him not to go.’
      • ‘I love you Emily, please I hope some day you will find it in your heart to forgive me, or at least allow me to say how truly sorry I am.’
      • ‘Sometimes humans try to destroy you even when you find it in your heart to do your best to assist them and elevate them from hovel to palace.’
      • ‘However, I can't find it in my heart to hate this one, maybe it's the singing, maybe it's a well-constructed song, maybe it's just a better example of the genre.’
      • ‘If each one of you can find it in your heart to donate £5, we will be able to buy tape stock.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • find against

    • (of a court) make a decision against or judge to be guilty.

      • ‘The European Court found against the government, in part, and awarded the newspapers substantial costs.’
      • ‘On both these issues of fact the judge found against the claimants.’
      • ‘It was clear that the Commission approached the case with a determination to find against the claimant at all costs.’
      • ‘I do not need to deal with this point as it was not a ground on which the judge found against the Appellants.’
      • ‘The final point on which the judge found against the appellant was that the claim the appellant was making was in effect that of the bank and not her claim.’
  • find for (or find in favour of)

    • (of a court) make a decision in favour of, or judge to be innocent.

      ‘the Court of Exchequer found for the plaintiffs’
      • ‘The Court of Appeal having found in favour of the plaintiffs, the Home Office appealed to the House of Lords.’
      • ‘The court should find for the Attorney General on this one - a public nuisance need not arise from the use of land.’
      • ‘For those reasons we respectfully submit that the Court should find for the defendants in relation to this claim.’
      • ‘The judge found in favour of the claimant against both the first and second defendants for damages to be assessed, subject to a deduction of 50% in respect of contributory negligence.’
      • ‘I should add that had I not found in favour of the plaintiff I would have still dismissed the counterclaim on the basis the defendant had failed to prove its damages.’
  • find someone out

    • Detect a person's immoral or offensive actions.

      ‘she would always find him out if he tried to lie’
      • ‘Don't try to fabricate anything on your CV, and don't try to hide anything at the interview, because you will be found out.’
      • ‘It was inevitable that you would be found out and convicted but in my view you were good at taking people in - you made it an art form.’
      • ‘‘It certainly wasn't planned but I had a good idea what the consequences would have been if we had been found out,’ she said.’
      • ‘Sooner or later events expose lies and find liars out, as the minister is already finding to his cost.’
      • ‘They were found out because of a mislabeled package, not because the FBI or any other law enforcement agencies were on the case.’
      • ‘Once you were found out, you said that you'd only been paid a small sum.’
      • ‘Whenever you are in trouble, you automatically resort to lies until you are found out.’
      • ‘She lied her way through school and university, until she was found out and had to leave.’
      • ‘Even if he does dispose of these assets, there will always be the accusation that he only did so once he was found out.’
      • ‘Misbehave and you are tomorrow's big headlines - if you are found out.’
  • find something out (or find out about something)

    • Discover a fact.

      ‘he hadn't time to find out what was bothering her’
      • ‘When Lucas found this fact out, he climbed onto my lap.’
      • ‘Institutions of higher learning need professionals possessed of just such a ‘determination to find things out,’ whether they succeed or not.’
      • ‘In fact, she only found out about the call-up after looking on the website of the sport's governing body.’
      • ‘Wiseman said: ‘It's quite crazy the fact that we just found out about the plans by chance.’’
      • ‘My friend found this fact out when this god-like figure told her so in a few choice words.’
      • ‘However, as he gets older and the risks are more serious, it becomes inevitable that his secret will be found out.’
      • ‘In fact without that check-up I may not have found out about it at all because there are no symptoms.’
      • ‘It would be good if your boys did not find out about it, but the fact of the relationship does not make your life ‘a lie.’’
      • ‘So the incident was covered up until a few local veteran detectives found out about it and decided to act.’
      • ‘Adam felt like there was something Lance wasn't telling him, but he figured finding it out could wait.’
      discover, become aware, learn, detect, discern, perceive, observe, notice, note, come to know, get to know, work out, deduce, fathom out, realize
      View synonyms


Old English findan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch vinden and German finden.