Main definitions of fils in English

: fils1fils2

fils1

noun

  • A monetary unit of Iraq, Bahrain, Jordan, Kuwait, and Yemen, equal to one hundredth of a riyal in Yemen and one thousandth of a dinar elsewhere.

    • ‘Diesel prices rise by 30 fils for second time in a month.’
    • ‘The Roads and Transport Authority (RTA) announced last year plans to increase the cost of crossing the creek by traditional motor boat from 50 fils to Dh1 by January 1.’
    • ‘You can cross the creek on a dhow-ferry which costs 50 fils or 9p.’

Origin

From a colloquial pronunciation of Arabic fals, denoting a small copper coin.

Pronunciation

fils

/fɪls/

Main definitions of fils in English

: fils1fils2

fils2

noun

  • Used after a surname to distinguish a son from a father of the same name.

    ‘Alexandre Dumas fils’
    Compare with père
    • ‘Considering how often we are told that Avon père and fils are cold-blooded killers with steel traps for minds, they are both incredibly stupid.’
    • ‘Hopefully Powell fils (I'm feeling French today) will learn to love being angry and speak up on behalf of his employers, the American people.’
    • ‘Although the country rid itself of the brutal regimes of Duvalier père and fils in 1986, the legacy of oppression remains.’
    • ‘That's when his father took over what was then a restaurant and converted it into a grocery store; as of the making of the film, Toupin fils had lived in that same building (in an apartment upstairs) for all of his 52 years.’
    • ‘From about age 6 to 16, Chapman fils accompanied his father during many trips.’
    • ‘But the role of the Establishment Candidate - occupied by Mondale, Bush père and fils, Gore, and Dole - is also not quite filled.’
    • ‘Brueghel fils may never have reached the heights of his dad, but his Kermesse of St George (estimated at £2.5m- £3.5m) should still make a pleasing stocking-filler.’
    • ‘Kahn fils structures the documentary as chapters of a book.’
    • ‘Nearly two decades after the fall of Duvalier fils, Haiti's social and economic fabric lies in utter shambles.’
    • ‘Banner père, who seems to take his grooming tips from the Unabomber (this explains the famous Nolte mugshot: he was just getting in character!) visits Banner fils and reveals the truth about his past.’
    • ‘Phillips points out the nexus between oil profits and tax shelters, on which the industry is heavily dependent for profits, and asserts that investment bankers kept bailing out Bush fils.’
    • ‘Forget Amis fils; this is a man conspicuously without the quality of modesty.’
    • ‘In between, they were owned by the Griffiths, Clark père and Calvin fils.’
    • ‘After his father's death in 1909, Gachet fils spent most of his life locked away in the Auvers house hoarding the past.’
    • ‘Eliasson's father was an artist who created, in his son's words, ‘pictures on the wall’ in mixed mediums, for which Eliasson fils recently arranged an exhibition in Iceland.’
    • ‘From the Alexandre Dumases, père and fils, to Kingsley and Martin Amis, father and son, the offspring of famous authors have followed in their parents' literary footsteps.’
    • ‘Abraham was a senior officer during the dictatorships of both Duvalier fils and Prosper Avril, then himself briefly held the reins of power in the run-up to the 1991 elections.’
    • ‘There's precious little genetics in the creative impulse if the paucity of père and fils novelists is anything to go by - or maybe the fear of comparison keeps most chips off the old block blocked for good.’
    • ‘In Selling Ben Cheever, Cheever fils relates what happened after his third novel was rejected by his publisher.’
    • ‘Klein fils is a Brown graduate who worked as a newspaper reporter, at the Virginian-Pilot the Baltimore Sun, and The Wall Street Journal, before moving onto the Washington Post.’

Origin

French, ‘son’.

Pronunciation

fils

/fiːs//fis/