Definition of fickle in English:

fickle

adjective

  • Changing frequently, especially as regards one's loyalties or affections.

    ‘celebs trying to appeal to an increasingly fickle public’
    • ‘Forever fickle, he has now become interested in old wooden carvings.’
    • ‘The fickle old tentacles of fame have already had far-reaching effects.’
    • ‘The public is not only fickle, but has a extremely short attention span.’
    • ‘The nation as a whole is too varied, fickle, inconsistent and unclassifiable for that to work.’
    • ‘Likewise, you really have to rush that stage from the beginning as first impressions count in the fickle minds of rap fans.’
    • ‘My superiors however are fickle and dance to a different drum than I do, so it would pay for me not to get my hopes up too high.’
    • ‘Unlike Fred who is a creature of habit, I am far more fickle, always in need of new experiences, change and variety.’
    • ‘They are, like Lincoln, using fickle political morality as the road to political power.’
    • ‘Holidaymakers are a fickle lot, and the next time they might just stay away once and for all.’
    • ‘But fashion is very fickle and sometimes the things you hate the most end up inspiring you.’
    • ‘Rock music is a harsh world, presided over by a fickle, unforgiving public.’
    • ‘They'd allow people to enjoy the nice weather, which can be unmercifully short and fickle.’
    • ‘It's important to do that, because human nature is fickle when it comes to responding to surveys.’
    • ‘Oh, apparently it's not my fault the writing here is bad - it's yours for being so flighty and fickle.’
    • ‘I think another interesting feature of this debate of course, is how fickle public opinion is.’
    • ‘Now the impression is of a fickle politician who has lots of ideas but no staying power to see them through.’
    • ‘This is a fickle business where tastes, music and fashions can change at a whim.’
    • ‘Keeping up with the fickle tastes of fashion is not always easy for the Dutch bulb industry.’
    • ‘What I like here is that people really pay attention and they're not so fickle.’
    • ‘However, we consumers are a fickle lot when it comes to dining out.’
    capricious, changeable, variable, volatile, mercurial, vacillating, fitful, irregular
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English ficol ‘deceitful’, of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation

fickle

/ˈfɪk(ə)l/