Definition of fickle in English:

fickle

adjective

  • Changing frequently, especially as regards one's loyalties or affections:

    ‘celebs trying to appeal to an increasingly fickle public’
    • ‘The public is not only fickle, but has a extremely short attention span.’
    • ‘However, we consumers are a fickle lot when it comes to dining out.’
    • ‘The nation as a whole is too varied, fickle, inconsistent and unclassifiable for that to work.’
    • ‘Oh, apparently it's not my fault the writing here is bad - it's yours for being so flighty and fickle.’
    • ‘Unlike Fred who is a creature of habit, I am far more fickle, always in need of new experiences, change and variety.’
    • ‘My superiors however are fickle and dance to a different drum than I do, so it would pay for me not to get my hopes up too high.’
    • ‘Likewise, you really have to rush that stage from the beginning as first impressions count in the fickle minds of rap fans.’
    • ‘Forever fickle, he has now become interested in old wooden carvings.’
    • ‘Holidaymakers are a fickle lot, and the next time they might just stay away once and for all.’
    • ‘I think another interesting feature of this debate of course, is how fickle public opinion is.’
    • ‘They are, like Lincoln, using fickle political morality as the road to political power.’
    • ‘What I like here is that people really pay attention and they're not so fickle.’
    • ‘Rock music is a harsh world, presided over by a fickle, unforgiving public.’
    • ‘They'd allow people to enjoy the nice weather, which can be unmercifully short and fickle.’
    • ‘Now the impression is of a fickle politician who has lots of ideas but no staying power to see them through.’
    • ‘Keeping up with the fickle tastes of fashion is not always easy for the Dutch bulb industry.’
    • ‘But fashion is very fickle and sometimes the things you hate the most end up inspiring you.’
    • ‘This is a fickle business where tastes, music and fashions can change at a whim.’
    • ‘The fickle old tentacles of fame have already had far-reaching effects.’
    • ‘It's important to do that, because human nature is fickle when it comes to responding to surveys.’
    capricious, changeable, variable, volatile, mercurial, vacillating, fitful, irregular
    inconstant, disloyal, undependable, unstable, unsteady, unfaithful, faithless
    irresolute, flighty, giddy, skittish, erratic, impulsive
    unpredictable, random
    blowing hot and cold
    labile
    mutable
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English ficol ‘deceitful’, of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation

fickle

/ˈfɪk(ə)l/