Definition of fianchetto in English:

fianchetto

noun

Chess
  • The development of a bishop by moving it one square to a long diagonal of the board.

    • ‘Black prepares the extended fianchetto of his light Bishop with… b7-b5.’
    • ‘The ancient Maestro played the double fianchetto opening.’
    • ‘Black normally puts his bishops on b7 and e7, and his knights on f6 and d7, but Suba also discusses double fianchetto systems and a… Nc6 option.’
    • ‘Further, very little of the rest of the repertoire involves a kingside fianchetto for black.’
    • ‘Timoscenko-Sax was a double fianchetto opening which Sax methodically overpowered with a kingside assault for the win in 33 moves.’
    • ‘I worked on an alternate line instead of the double fianchetto that had been killed by Attila, and this time at least the opening worked!’
    • ‘Of course, in this last move order black is committed to the queenside fianchetto.’
    • ‘The first two chapters deal with systems where Black answers 1.e4 with a kingside fianchetto and… c6 followed typically by… d5.’
    • ‘These are solid, playable lines, and their study may benefit the black player, because most of their opponents prep more for the lines with a king bishop fianchetto.’
    • ‘He also groups all the lines where both sides pursue a kingside fianchetto.’
    • ‘Davies suggests instead that white should be playing for c2-c4 with a kingside fianchetto.’
    • ‘It would be nice if this could be truly a ‘one scheme fits all’ approach to the Sicilian; alas, there are lines where the kingside fianchetto is hard to achieve (or is not worth achieving).’
    • ‘Nigel quite rightly recognizes that setups based on g3, Bg2 and - don't offer much versus 1… c5 and 2… g6 as the White Knight on f3 costs flexibility, allowing Black good play with a kingside fianchetto and either… e5 or… e6.’
    • ‘One of the advantages of this form of Dutch is that it is not played nearly as often as the Stonewall or Leningrad (characterized by black's fianchetto of the dark squared bishop) variations.’
    • ‘There are a variety of other tries as well, including lines where black plays an early Bf5 or Bg4, or adopts a kingside fianchetto.’
    • ‘The last time the Kings Indian and Grunfeld fianchetto lines were covered it was in two separate books by GMs McNab and Mikhalchisin.’
    • ‘In many d-pawn openings, a kingside fianchetto is White's way of saying he'd rather live a quiet life.’
    • ‘The queenside fianchetto is yet another formation that Black can adopt and which is very popular today.’
    • ‘More logical here is the fianchetto, but after 6… g6 7.Be3 Bg7 8.f3 0-0 9.Qd2 the game takes very sharp turns, which Spassky does not seem to relish.’
    • ‘To simplify White's task and avoid certain lines, Kosten recommends the immediate fianchetto of White's king bishop after 1… e5, 1… c5, 1… Nf6, and even 1… e6 and 1… e6.’

verb

[with object]Chess
  • Develop (a bishop) by moving it one square to a long diagonal of the board.

    • ‘Black's Bishops are both fianchettoed, while his Knights stand side by side on e7 and d7.’
    • ‘White played quietly, fianchettoing his King's bishop.’
    • ‘The book concludes with a twelve page chapter on other Stonewalls and sixteen pages on lines where white plays e2-e3 rather than fianchettoing his king bishop.’
    • ‘At this stage Black probably wanted to fianchetto his c8 bishop and the immediate 12… b6 loses to 13 Qe4.’
    • ‘Black intends to fianchetto his Bishop on g7, but he's in for a surprise.’
    • ‘Yes, Turkey does the same thing, but why throw away a perfectly good knight just because you have a bishop fianchettoed in the corner?’
    • ‘In each you'll see Black trying to break the shackles by fianchettoing his queen's Bishop and endeavoring to break in the center with… d7-d5.’
    • ‘Gurevich tried a similar idea in the French line played by Morozevich yesterday, capturing on f6 with his g-pawn and fianchettoing his queen-bishop.’
    • ‘Gelfand fianchettoed his dard-squared bishop, Anand exchanged a few pieces and suggested a draw on move 21.’
    • ‘Black will probably fianchetto his King's Bishop on g7 and support his center with… Nbd7 and… c7-c6.’
    • ‘This is a repertoire book and does not attempt to be comprehensive, leaving out, for example, variations in which black fianchettoes his king bishop.’
    • ‘Instead he calmly fianchettoes a bishop and argues the he can attend to things like development later in the game.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from Italian, diminutive of fianco ‘flank’, ultimately of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation

fianchetto

/ˌfɪəntˈkɛtəʊ//ˌfɪənˈtʃɛtəʊ/