Definition of felony in English:

felony

noun

  • A crime regarded in the US and many other judicial systems as more serious than a misdemeanour.

    ‘he pleaded guilty to six felonies’
    mass noun ‘an accusation of felony’
    • ‘So your Honour can see that there was no act done in the course of a different felony which you would need for a felony murder situation.’
    • ‘Dealing with felonies, including rape, murder, and assault, often fell to the citizens who witnessed them.’
    • ‘If convicted of the felony charges they could face up to five years in jail.’
    • ‘Now the choice is go to trial on a felony assault charge and hope for an acquittal or plead guilty to a misdemeanor.’
    • ‘California requires DNA sampling only from those convicted for violent felonies and some sex crimes.’
    • ‘Some of these crimes are misdemeanors; others are felonies of various degrees.’
    • ‘In the US, the vast majority of murders and other felonies are state crimes.’
    • ‘What's the difference between felonies, misdemeanors, and infractions?’
    • ‘One fan will be charged with a felony assault charge for accusations of throwing a chair.’
    • ‘There is a considerable historical literature that explores changes in the process of prosecuting both felonies and misdemeanors in England.’
    • ‘In the great majority of cases in which death ensues as a result of a tort felony has been committed.’
    • ‘The 39-year-old singer was booked on a felony charge of assault with a deadly weapon late on Friday.’
    • ‘And the schedule is there, so your Honours can see how the felonies and misdemeanours were changed.’
    • ‘That charge could be filed as either a misdemeanor or a felony, depending on the circumstances.’
    • ‘Well, in this case, under a felony murder charge, she would be guilty and a jury has found her guilty.’
    • ‘If convicted of the felony charge, the woman could face up to five years in jail.’
    • ‘The total number of sustained felonies, misdemeanors, and probation violations was computed.’
    • ‘If convicted on the felony charge, he could lose his right to work in the United States.’
    • ‘Using a destructive device in a violent crime is a federal felony that carries a mandatory minimum of 30 years in jail.’
    • ‘The principal felonies were homicide, rape, theft, burglary, robbery and arson.’
    crime, lawbreaking, lawlessness, criminality, misconduct, malpractice, corruption, unethical behaviour, immorality, sin, sinfulness, wickedness, badness, evil, vice, iniquity, villainy, delinquency, misbehaviour, mischief, naughtiness
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old French felonie, from felon (see felon).

Pronunciation

felony

/ˈfɛləni/