Main definitions of felon in English

: felon1felon2

felon1

noun

  • A person who has committed a felony.

    • ‘As I've noted before and noted today in my column, there is still no system for tracking criminal illegal alien felons and other inmates.’
    • ‘Trying to prevent convicted felons from committing more crimes raises profound questions of character, habit, and the limits of social intervention.’
    • ‘When a convicted felon commits a crime they take his DNA.’
    • ‘As with many other laws in the United States, legislation denying voting rights to convicted felons and other offenders varies widely from state to state.’
    • ‘The felon responded by committing another burglary.’
    • ‘If you're a convicted felon, go where felons are, not where good people are.’
    • ‘He is a convicted felon who made illegal political contributions.’
    • ‘The searches would not detect felons who had committed felonies in other states, and then moved to Washington.’
    • ‘They're standing behind convicted criminals, convicted felons.’
    • ‘I mean do you ever see situations where monies are taken away from convicted felons in order to compensate the victims?’
    • ‘He encouraged her to read out the death warrants of convicted felons and witness the executions.’
    • ‘Those kinds of places were only good to find felons and thieves.’
    • ‘Passengers discovered the man, a convicted felon on probation for burglary, hiding in an airplane restroom.’
    • ‘Incidentally, it is illegal for a convicted felon to own a firearm of any type.’
    • ‘Such force was justifiable against 'felons', and a thief was a felon if he had two previous convictions.’
    • ‘Accused felons were allowed to call witnesses, and defendants were given other procedural protections.’
    • ‘Perjury is a felony; felons are not only disqualified from holding public office, they can't vote.’
    • ‘The few pretenders who remained were a disappointing assortment of dim, second-class felons and impotent thugs.’
    • ‘Virginia joined in by collecting the DNA of all convicted felons, not just sex offenders.’
    • ‘The issue of whether convicted felons can profit from the sale of their stories, which are inevitably entangled with their victims' stories, is a familiar one.’
    criminal, lawbreaker, offender, villain, black hat, delinquent, malefactor, culprit, wrongdoer, transgressor, sinner
    View synonyms

adjective

archaic
  • attributive Cruel; wicked.

Origin

Middle English: from Old French, literally ‘wicked, a wicked person’ (oblique case of fel ‘evil’), from medieval Latin fello, fellon-, of unknown origin. Compare with felon.

Pronunciation

felon

/ˈfɛlən/

Main definitions of felon in English

: felon1felon2

felon2

noun

  • archaic term for whitlow
    • ‘Empiric antibiotic coverage with a first-generation cephalosporin or antistaphylococcal penicillin usually is adequate treatment for an uncomplicated felon.’
    • ‘A felon is an abscess of the distal pulp or phalanx pad of the fingertip.’

Origin

Middle English: perhaps a specific use of felon; medieval Latin fello, fellon- had the same sense.

Pronunciation

felon

/ˈfɛlən/