Definition of feel-good factor in English:

feel-good factor

phrase

British
  • A widespread feeling of well-being and financial security, especially viewed as a factor in increased consumer spending.

    • ‘Opposition parties have tried to attack the Prime Minister on the poor state of public services and infrastructure, but the popular Dubliner has benefited from the feel-good factor created by the economic boom of recent years.’
    • ‘House prices rose in value by an average of 25% last year, sending the feel-good factor among residents spiralling upwards.’
    • ‘Then there's a poll that claims 73% of Britons believe hosting the games would enhance our national prestige, create a feel-good factor and give us improved sporting facilities.’
    • ‘Hopefully, Bradford will turn out to be the ideal place to be located with all the new apartments that are coming up in the city and the feel-good factor beginning to return.’
    • ‘There is definitely a little bit of a feel-good factor returning and that is spreading outside the area.’
    • ‘It's given the area a feel-good factor and raised the profile of the towns.’
    • ‘‘The feel-good factor brings people back again,’ he said.’
    • ‘There's a feel-good factor for people when they see lighting in areas.’
    • ‘Also, the feel-good factor induced by good results on the international stage has become increasingly rare as, at both Scottish and British levels, we have been overtaken by those countries prepared to invest seriously in sport.’
    • ‘People have to be comfortable about investing in that future, so the feel-good factor is important for everyone.’
    • ‘But it is familiar in the United States, where buyers are wooed with the feel-good factor of a ‘long-haul warranty’.’
    • ‘The feel-good factor in the farmlands of the region is confirmed by the latest rural tourism confidence index run by the Countryside and Business Association.’
    • ‘In many cases, those willing to lend a hand to causes just for the feel-good factor it brings are prevented from doing so by the financial pressures of their lives.’
    • ‘A cleaner area looks better and gives a better feel-good factor.’
    • ‘That suggests we'll escape any nasty surprises in next year's Budget, and almost certainly enjoy a few giveaways, followed by a post-election feel-good factor just to make sure we feel grateful to the returning government.’