Definition of feel in English:

feel

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Be aware of (a person or object) through touching or being touched.

    ‘she felt someone touch her shoulder’
    ‘you can feel the soft grass beneath your feet’
    • ‘I can almost feel the texture of candyfloss in my hair or the stickiness of a toffee apple all over my face.’
    • ‘She felt around for the lock and grimaced when she felt the cold metal touch her skin.’
    • ‘She could feel a rough wall against her back and she wondered where they had taken her.’
    • ‘When Turat tugs a long, sturdy aluminum tent stake out of the ground, he feels the pointed end with his finger and catches Smith's eye.’
    • ‘I felt someone touch my hand.’
    • ‘He suddenly felt his brother's hand on his arm.’
    • ‘I walked around the park in my bare feet, feeling the cool soft grass, until I found a shady spot to sit down.’
    • ‘Alexia was about to get up when she was yanked backwards by her hair, she felt a knife at her throat and looked up.’
    • ‘Both of them were pacing around the beach, feeling the hot sand beneath their cold feet.’
    • ‘She testified that she placed her left hand on the man's forehead and felt no hair.’
    perceive, sense, detect, discern, make out, notice, observe, identify
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Be aware of (something happening) through physical sensation.
      ‘she felt the ground give way beneath her’
      • ‘He had just turned on the water and began shampooing his hair when he felt the door open.’
      • ‘A familiar Spring breeze blew past us and I felt my hair brushing against my face.’
      • ‘He could still close his eyes and see her face, smell her hair and feel the touch of her hand on his.’
      • ‘Sitting in the car on a wet afternoon, I felt the hairs prick up on the back of my neck.’
      • ‘She could feel the water begin to ebb away from her skin, and she felt her damp hair drying.’
      • ‘I didn't know what was going on, but apparently they had felt the vibrations from the quake and come out of the sand.’
      • ‘Lise felt the vibrations on the ground coming closer.’
      • ‘She felt it remove the short ribbon binding her hair, felt the braid loosen and her blue tresses whip free.’
      • ‘She could hear shallow breathing and felt the warmth of a body turn over.’
      • ‘When he hears a particularly fine piece, he says he can feel the hairs coming up on his arms.’
      • ‘She felt them braid her hair very tightly and then heard them take the scissors to it.’
      • ‘Cecil ran a soothing hand down her hair as he felt tears coursing down his own face.’
      • ‘I felt a strand of hair fall across my face and a moment later a tender hand brush it back into place.’
      • ‘He felt the hairs on the back of his neck stand on end as he sensed that Lucas was nearby.’
      • ‘After a few minutes, he felt the hairs on the back of his neck stand on end like he was being watched.’
      • ‘She found a rare empty seat and was walking toward it when she felt a tap on her shoulder.’
      • ‘While it is still winter, we can start to feel the change in climate upon us.’
      • ‘When she stepped out of the alley, she immediately felt the hair on the back of her neck prickle.’
      • ‘A hand went up to her hair as she felt it falling out of the bun in wisps beside her temples.’
    2. 1.2 Examine or search by touch.
      ‘he touched her head and felt her hair’
      no object ‘he felt around for the matches’
      • ‘I felt around and found some old newspapers and tried to cover myself.’
      • ‘I just keep feeling the hair in the back there and trying to get all the hair on the back of my neck off.’
      • ‘Mac ran a hand over his short hair, then gently felt the bump on the back of his head.’
      • ‘He backed away from the couch, and felt for the light switch.’
      • ‘Head to the first floor where the exhibitors have taken individual rooms to get you to see, touch, and feel the products.’
      • ‘On her way down the stairs she felt inside her pocket to make sure she still had the keys.’
      • ‘I felt around under the bed for some kind of weapon: if they made one more move on him it'd be their last.’
      • ‘In the afternoon Burginde rummaged amongst our wool sacks, feeling with her hands how much carded fleece was left.’
      • ‘She ran a hand through her hair and felt the cut where she had been roughed up by Derek.’
      touch, stroke, caress, fondle, finger, thumb, handle, manipulate, fiddle with, play with, toy with, maul
      test, try, try out, assess
      View synonyms
    3. 1.3no object Be capable of sensation.
      ‘the dead cannot feel’
      • ‘Collections of people do not have unique consciousness or identities: ‘society’ and ‘the people’ do not feel, need, think, or have rights.’
      • ‘I don't feel, can't feel, don't want to feel.’
    4. 1.4no object, with complement Give a sensation of a particular physical quality when touched.
      ‘the wool feels soft’
      • ‘She gave me her hand, which felt cold, like the skin of a serpent.’
      • ‘If your lawn feels soft and spongy, chances are you've got thatch.’
      • ‘It rubs in quickly leaving your skin feeling softer after a few minutes.’
      • ‘The soft baby skin felt like silk and the bit of fuzz on the baby's head tickled Maya's hand.’
      • ‘Placing his hand on the creature's neck, Erik let out a small smile as he felt how soft it was.’
      • ‘Her palm feels warm and soft and smooth, and I know because I shook hands with her when I wished her good luck for her history exam.’
      • ‘My clothes feel wet.’
      • ‘The lightweight, non-oily formula absorbs instantly so skin feels clean, soft and smooth.’
      • ‘The NRC developed a new enzyme, designed to make hemp feel softer but remain durable.’
      • ‘My energy levels appear to be rising and my skin is losing its papery pallor and feels softer.’
      • ‘Fleece is made from polyester and is designed to feel soft, warm and elastic.’
      • ‘The sand beneath my feet felt so good, soft and cool while the ocean water came up to my ankles.’
      • ‘Rest assured that the material used in this is of a much higher quality, and feels good to the touch.’
      • ‘Remove the garlic and continue cooking the aubergine for a further ten minutes, or until it feels soft and the skin is charred and black.’
      • ‘I continued to feel relaxed all evening, my face had a healthy glow and my skin had never felt softer.’
      • ‘Add powdered milk until dough feels soft, smooth, and not sticky.’
      • ‘It was deep and had wonderful hues of gold and other colors mingled in with it and it even felt soft to walk on.’
      seem, appear, strike one as
      View synonyms
    5. 1.5feel something outinformal Investigate something cautiously.
      ‘they want to feel out the situation’
      • ‘Over the next four years he made further visits to New York to feel out the market.’
      • ‘An analyst reported that elements in the army were feeling out support from foreign governments for a move against the president.’
      • ‘They were cautiously feeling things out, but when the conversation didn't blow up in their faces, their voices grew more confident.’
      • ‘After you feel the situation out you can take appropriate action.’
    6. 1.6feel someone upinformal Fondle someone surreptitiously and without their consent, for one's own sexual stimulation.
      • ‘He wants you all to himself, he doesn't even like other people looking at you, much less feeling you up,’ he said in a sexy voice, and pulled her close to him.’
      • ‘While waiting in queue to buy their tickets, they were mobbed by local men, who manhandled them, pushed them into a corner, pressed against them and felt them up.’
      • ‘So, if you want to get close, maybe try to feel out her worldview before you feel her up.’
      • ‘But if you were felt up at a high school party because you got a little too drunk to say no, maybe we should put you in jail.’
      • ‘After Evan had felt me up, I really didn't like people touching me.’
      • ‘They groped us, felt us up and thrust their pelvic regions into our backsides.’
      • ‘I spin my head to see who felt me up, and it's just a woman with no distinguishable features who looks like she's on her way to work too.’
      • ‘We start making out and I started feeling her up.’
      • ‘He taught me and my sister backgammon and felt us up.’
      • ‘Yeah, he was just feeling you up and getting off with you!’
      caress, stroke, pat, pet, pull, finger, touch, tickle, twiddle, play with, massage, knead
      View synonyms
  • 2Experience (an emotion or sensation)

    ‘I felt a sense of excitement’
    no object, with complement ‘she started to feel really sick’
    ‘it felt odd to be alone again’
    no object ‘we feel very strongly about freedom of expression’
    • ‘They both grinned at me and I suddenly felt uncomfortable under their gazes.’
    • ‘Many women feel uneasy about taking medications during pregnancy.’
    • ‘I felt dizzy from standing so quickly when I had gotten out of bed.’
    • ‘He felt a strong urge to run, but his friends were in there.’
    • ‘Can the reader feel pity and terror for Macbeth?’
    • ‘Training supported by a mentoring programme and a help desk can help staff feel more secure.’
    • ‘She forced herself to refocus on what was going on in front of her and suddenly felt at ease.’
    • ‘However, not all SFU students feel so strongly about the issue.’
    • ‘She pulled herself up using the wall as a support, still feeling dizzy.’
    • ‘Reading a diary - even if its author is several hundred years dead - sometimes feels voyeuristic.’
    • ‘Do you ever feel uncomfortable leaving a comment on a blog you've never commented on before?’
    • ‘I felt like a failure and ate more, only making me feel worse.’
    • ‘He made me feel welcome when I came back from my injury, too.’
    • ‘Does this mean I have to find friends that make me feel inferior?’
    • ‘We also aim to make parents feel more confident.’
    • ‘When I think about it, I just feel horribly guilty.’
    • ‘She almost felt ashamed for it, though she knew she shouldn't.’
    • ‘I have just been down to Myrtle Walk and felt physically sickened by its filthy, dilapidated state.’
    • ‘However, she felt a twinge of disappointment when she couldn't see him.’
    • ‘He might feel shock or surprise or perhaps amusement, and I did not want my gift to give rise to any of these thoughts in him.’
    • ‘It can take several minutes to complete the mayonnaise, by which time your whisking arm will feel dead.’
    • ‘Reddish tints gleamed in her hair, and he felt the urge to run his hands through it.’
    • ‘We like people to settle in, make it their own and feel comfortable.’
    • ‘In general, respondents felt confident in their abilities to deal with alcohol problems.’
    • ‘All the swallowing has made me feel ill and keeping anything down is hard.’
    • ‘Maybe you should do something nice for her, to make her feel special.’
    experience, undergo, go through, bear, endure, suffer, be forced to contend with
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    1. 2.1no object, with complement Consider oneself to be in a particular state or exhibiting particular qualities.
      ‘he doesn't feel obliged to visit every weekend’
      ‘she felt such a fool’
      • ‘Her people are crying in front of her and she felt out of place.’
      • ‘The survey highlighted that 68 per cent of the residents feel safer now than they did before the Neighbourhood Wardens started.’
      • ‘They had felt capable of carrying out the work which was being sought.’
      • ‘But, just a few months shy of his 28th birthday, as well as reaching his peak physically, he feels that he is at his mental best, too.’
      • ‘The only thing I felt capable of doing was locking myself in a room and making a record.’
      • ‘It was helpful, but I felt a failure if I couldn't make him fall around laughing.’
      • ‘I twisted my hair up in a knot and suddenly, in the soft light, felt quite beautiful.’
      • ‘Jones says it is not just about dealing with employees that feel under pressure.’
      • ‘Perhaps in some way they feel abandoned and search for someone who is always going to need them.’
      • ‘After losing more than a stone since the Open, he also feels in the best physical shape of his life.’
      • ‘The capital side have been excelling in ladies football for the past few seasons, however this team now feels capable of taking on anyone.’
      • ‘He pulled his knees up to his chest and wrapped his arms around his legs feeling very out of place.’
      • ‘I feel better and more capable, and more attractive now than I have ever felt in my life.’
      • ‘These are the people who rock up to class each week just because it makes them feel dead sexy.’
      • ‘There's no gate at the entrance and students just don't feel safe.’
      • ‘When you feel comfortable on one foot with your eyes open, close them.’
      • ‘Parents feel helpless in today's changing world and wonder how to cope with the truant child.’
      • ‘But following off-season surgery to his wrist and shoulder, he feels ready for the physical demands of Super League.’
      consider, think, regard, look on as, view as, see as, hold to be, judge, adjudge, rate as, deem to be, account, esteem
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    2. 2.2feel up tono object Have the strength and energy to do or deal with.
      ‘after the accident she didn't feel up to driving’
      • ‘She asked if we needed any help, and I said we could maybe use a hand if she felt up to it.’
      • ‘I have not felt up to writing this description of events until today.’
      • ‘Be gentle with yourself if you don't feel up to exercising.’
      • ‘Today's technicians welcome the focus on their jobs and feel up to the challenge.’
    3. 2.3feel oneselfusually with negative Be healthy and well.
      ‘Ruth was not quite feeling herself’
      • ‘I wasn't really concentrating and I wasn't feeling myself.’
      • ‘Two decades ago she was a highly driven academic - until the fateful morning when she got out of bed feeling not quite herself.’
    4. 2.4 Be strongly affected by.
      ‘he didn't feel the loss of his mother so keenly’
      ‘investors who have felt the effects of the recession’
      • ‘Art is a luxury, so our industry often feels an economic downturn before other industries.’
      • ‘The effects of climate change continue to be felt around the world, with increasing severity.’
      • ‘Smith died in 2003 of a fatal stab wound to the heart and his departure has been felt around the world.’
      • ‘As a committed family man he would have felt those tragedies keenly.’
      • ‘We're all feeling the loss of heroes that we love.’
      • ‘When trading started again on Monday morning, the financial impact of the failure was quickly felt.’
    5. 2.5feel forno object Have compassion for.
      ‘poor woman—I do feel for her’
      • ‘He does not feel for the families of the dead or for the thirty-five million of us who live in poverty.’
      • ‘People have truly felt for the victims and responded with money and in other ways.’
      • ‘He genuinely feels for his people, and he wants them to be in a position where they don't have to suffer any longer.’
      • ‘We feel deeply for the plight of the refugees.’
      sympathize with, be sorry for, pity, feel pity for, feel sympathy for, feel compassion for, empathize with, identify with, be moved by, weep for, grieve for, sorrow for
      View synonyms
  • 3with clause Have a belief or impression, especially without an identifiable reason.

    ‘she felt that the woman positively disliked her’
    • ‘After three years of hard graft in LA, the young Dubliner felt success was just a matter of time.’
    • ‘Probably only two seconds had gone by, but it felt like an eternity.’
    • ‘Lesley now feels her search has hit a brick wall and would desperately like help or advice on how to take it further.’
    • ‘It's almost as if people feel the need to apologize if they don't follow some party line.’
    • ‘I knew there were lots of things I wasn't doing right but I always felt I was capable of it, you know?’
    • ‘I did not get really angry at her - for some reason I felt I had to be gentle with her.’
    • ‘‘My guys up there said it felt like an eternity,’ Marks said.’
    sense, have a feeling, get the impression, feel in one's bones, have a hunch, have a funny feeling, just know, intuit
    View synonyms
    1. 3.1 Hold an opinion.
      ‘I felt I could make a useful contribution’
      • ‘He said he felt the incident was a form of discrimination and had left him angry and wanting an explanation.’
      • ‘He feels the protest has achieved what it set out to do and is hopeful the government will cut the fuel tax.’
      • ‘Everyone I contacted in my highly unscientific poll feels this election was more than a defeat.’
      • ‘But he felt the management change would see the service finally getting back on the right track.’
      • ‘Cumbria team manager Roger Hackney said he felt the county championship was being downgraded.’
      • ‘My policy is to ignore readers who feel it necessary to resort to insults.’
      • ‘McLeish admitted it had been a tough election but felt the contest had delivered him a mandate.’
      • ‘We felt these meetings did give people the opportunity to clarify points and make their views known.’
      • ‘I felt the programme focussed a bit too much on what it was like to be a ‘man’ in 2005.’
      • ‘Calderwood felt Aberdeen's performance was decent up until the goal but degenerated thereafter.’
      • ‘He felt the business market between Edinburgh and Europe was under-served.’
      • ‘In the end, Lee felt the parties were looking to exploit his difficulties for publicity.’
      • ‘He felt the changes in lifestyle and especially in farming in recent years was a factor.’
      • ‘In their first eight games, they dropped 11 points, and Aidie Moran felt changes had to be made.’
      • ‘Was his life at the ranch so difficult he felt it necessary to leave?’
      • ‘Cooper also feels Ferguson's success has sparked a sharp increase in his detractors.’
      • ‘Former party official Matthew Taylor feels that conference has become ‘ritualistic and pointless’.’
      • ‘But he felt the markets might lose their special appeal if they became a routine, weekly event.’
      • ‘Interviews with a number of children and their parents emphasised how successful they felt the event to be.’
      • ‘He said he felt a change of direction was needed when he took over at the pub, which had stiff competition.’
      believe, think, consider it right, consider, fancy, be of the opinion, hold, maintain, judge, deem
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noun

  • 1usually in singular An act of touching something to examine it.

    • ‘Give him the warren of streets with their hiding places and dolly birds willing to feed and shelter a man for a few quick feels.’
    • ‘If you have children under five, it's worth having a quick feel inside the video recorder for rogue bananas before angrily demanding a refund.’
    • ‘At 11.25 I wondered if I had any spots that might need squeezing and had a feel round my face.’
    • ‘I let him have a feel of my hair and kept saying ‘it's a bit of a shock, isn't it?’ (must have been terrifying for a two year old!).’
    • ‘The girls were dancing about and the men were trying to get a feel as they walked by, and things were getting out of hand.’
    1. 1.1mass noun The sense of touch.
      ‘he worked by feel rather than using his eyes’
      • ‘Their bumpy quality comes from the raised relief so blind people can identify different bills by feel.’
      • ‘It was fairly rough to the feel, and looked like it had been made out of crushed granite, cement, and water mixed together.’
      • ‘Parts of plants are generally described as ‘succulent’ if they are particularly fleshy, not woody, to the feel and noticeably watery if squashed.’
      • ‘The best way to tell a ripe avocado is by feel.’
      touch, sense of touch, tactile sense, tactility, feeling, feeling one's way, contact
      View synonyms
  • 2usually in singular A sensation given by an object or material when touched.

    ‘nylon cloth with a cotton feel’
    • ‘The fabric is made of 43% polyester and 57% combed cotton, with a cotton-rich feel.’
    • ‘It was a light gray coat made of a material that had the feel of soft fur, but the look of well-made leather.’
    • ‘Polyurethane is extremely light and has the feel of hardened styrene foam.’
    texture, surface, finish, grain, nap
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 The impression given by something.
      ‘a cafe with a cosmopolitan feel’
      • ‘Mr Taylor said: " The materials were specially chosen to create an airy feel.’
      • ‘Instead the Cat and Fiddle had an almost homely feel about it.’
      • ‘But the film's authentic feel is undermined by a series of political compromises.’
      • ‘Besides, it only adds to the gritty, realistic feel Bogdanovich was aiming for.’
      • ‘The film has a very gritty, realistic feel, again lifting it above being a merely stereotypical genre exercise.’
      • ‘The first is to give an overall feel of the film.’
      • ‘But what makes this movie so much fun is the authentic retro feel.’
      • ‘The interior has the homely feel of a comfortable country retreat rather than a royal palace.’
      • ‘The stadium's multitude of glass creates a light, airy feel.’
      • ‘The vocals soar over the mix adding to the epic feel of each track.’
      • ‘The seats are very close together, and this lends an intimate, crowded feel to the place.’
      • ‘"Unicorn Dream " is one of these and has the airy feel of a Scandinavian piece.’
      atmosphere, ambience, aura, mood, feeling, air, impression, climate, character, overtone, undertone, tenor, spirit, quality, flavour, colour
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  • 3feelsinformal usually in singular Feelings of heightened emotion.

    ‘fans will undoubtedly get the feels when they see how things haven't changed’
    ‘I cry at everything, even the types of movies you wouldn't expect to give you all the feels’

Phrases

  • feel one's age

    • Become aware that one is growing older and less energetic.

      • ‘I most certainly do not feel my age but we are made to feel that we are well and truly past it.’
      • ‘He misses her terribly, and for the first time, he is truly feeling his age.’
      • ‘He doesn't feel his age, 61, and loves performing and meeting the fans that still flock to these performances.’
  • feel free (to do something)

    • Have no hesitation or shyness (often used as an invitation or for reassurance)

      ‘feel free to say what you like’
      • ‘I'm in New York and you can feel free to email me.’
      • ‘A manager told me that the lifeguards were confused, that it was not club policy, and that I should feel free to stay.’
      • ‘You can only choose one director, but feel free to discuss or criticize others' choices.’
      • ‘And if something doesn't work, then feel free to change it, or make something else that does work.’
      • ‘I hope you will feel free to contact me with your ideas and questions.’
  • feel like (doing) something

    • Be inclined to have or do.

      ‘I feel like celebrating’
      • ‘After dinner we felt like a drink.’
      • ‘We're supposed to have dance class tonight, but I don't feel like going.’
      • ‘He tried to joke, but I just did not feel like laughing.’
      • ‘He felt like a walk and some food.’
      • ‘I felt like crying most of Sunday and Monday, but that's normal.’
      want, would like, wish for, desire, fancy, feel in need of, feel the need for, long for, crave, hanker after, pine for, thirst for, be desperate for, be bent on
      View synonyms
  • feel one's way

    • 1Find one's way by touch rather than sight.

      ‘he felt his way back to the stairs’
      • ‘A mouse uses its whiskers to feel its way around.’
      • ‘It was a bit tougher going than the way up, feeling his way down.’
      • ‘They are climbing in virtual total darkness; they have to feel their way up, by the way of trials.’
      • ‘Knowing the layout well enough to find the cups in the dark, she felt her way around.’
      • ‘He placed a hand on either side of the tunnel trying to feel his way down the stairway.’
      • ‘I stepped towards the door, and felt my way up three steps.’
      • ‘She pushed, desperately feeling her way along it.’
      • ‘Katie tip toed through the dark apartment, feeling her way around to make sure she didn't run into any sharp edges.’
      • ‘Residents said the white cane he uses to feel his way around reminded them of the staff used by bishops during religious ceremonies.’
      • ‘She crawled across the hard floor, feeling her way to the other wall.’
      grope, fumble, scrabble, pick, poke, explore
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Proceed cautiously, especially in a situation that is unfamiliar.
        ‘she was new in the job, still feeling her way’
        • ‘Like any good show feeling its way through, we are never sure what she is meant to be.’
        • ‘Both countries were feeling their way towards the most effective policies.’
        • ‘You know, being new to the position, I still had to feel my way through.’
        • ‘Novelists would have to feel their way towards a new literary process.’
        • ‘I am part of a generation which is still feeling its way.’
        • ‘It will not be broken by feeling our way into the future with tenative leaders.’
        • ‘Its more of a guideline to feel your way into the gaming world.’
        • ‘At this stage in the game the housemates are still feeling their way, positioning themselves for the long haul.’
        • ‘You have to have some sort of form in which to feel your way toward God.’
        • ‘Over recent years we have been feeling our way towards more openness.’
  • get a (or the) feel for (or of)

    • Become accustomed to.

      ‘you can explore to get a feel of the place’
      • ‘This game allows the user to get the feel for being a corporate manager with ties to the Mob.’
      • ‘We got a feel for their lifestyle and for what was important to them.’
      • ‘After 7 laps I had really got the feel of the car and found you could easily go though the chicane at 90-100 mph.’
      • ‘I just came down here today to take in the buzz and get the feel of the atmosphere and it was great.’
      • ‘That's the one thing that he's been maybe a little bit slow at, just because he's still getting a feel for it.’
  • have a feel for

    • Have a sensitive appreciation or an intuitive understanding of.

      ‘you have to have a feel for animals’
      • ‘By talking with and observing enough users, you'll have a feel for which issues are general trends and which are random comments.’
      • ‘While I occasionally have a feel for how a game will work, I often don't, and don't even have the rules completely hashed out.’
      • ‘I don't have a feel for who I think is going to win this election.’
      • ‘You've got to have a feel for what's in style and what's in style for the customer.’
      • ‘He has always had a feel for what the audience wants and never knowingly undersells a great event or oversells a poor event.’
      • ‘We need people in there who have a feel for football and understand it.’
      • ‘I truly do not have a feel for how widespread that actually is.’
      • ‘As a native of another though larger country town in York, he has a feel for what the community expects.’
      • ‘I really have a feel for what regular people like.’
      • ‘I never tackle a design project until I have a feel for what is needed somewhere.’
  • make oneself (or one's presence) felt

    • Have a noticeable effect or influence.

      ‘the economic crisis began to make itself felt’
      • ‘The full consequences of the destruction of savings on such a scale and at such a pace have only just begun to make themselves felt.’
      • ‘Changes this profound in the make-up of the heartland communities are unlikely to happen in the political dark, and, indeed, are beginning to make themselves felt in the national debate.’
      • ‘The effects of over-consumption make themselves felt - this is acknowledged in the conclusion, but not in the body of the argument.’
      • ‘But gradually harsher realities began to make themselves felt.’
      • ‘But he has made his presence felt in the art world in many other ways as well.’
      • ‘The falling dollar, despite its recent bounce-back, has begun to make itself felt: manufacturers report a sharp rise in exports.’
      • ‘With her sultry cover-girl looks, she certainly looks as though she possesses the x-factor needed to make her presence felt in the world of pop.’
      • ‘Already global warming is beginning to make itself felt even in Bangalore.’
      • ‘First there was the effect of the recession, which began to make itself felt around midsummer.’
      • ‘The net effect is a vast area poor in resources, an effect that makes itself felt throughout the food web.’

Origin

Old English fēlan, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch voelen and German fühlen.

Pronunciation

feel

/fiːl/