Definition of favouritism in English:

favouritism

(US favoritism)

noun

mass noun
  • 1The practice of giving unfair preferential treatment to one person or group at the expense of another.

    ‘my parents would vehemently deny showing favouritism towards one child in particular’
    • ‘Embezzlement of oil revenues, bribery, and ethnic favoritism are all common practices.’
    • ‘And despite coming under heavy fire from political opponents for alleged favouritism towards his home county, the minister is remaining defiant.’
    • ‘The effects of this phenomenon are compounded by the continued practice of favouritism in political appointments, promotions and other decisions.’
    • ‘Anything else would smack of favoritism and unfair treatment for a general officer.’
    • ‘He does not want to hear about favouritism towards kindergartens.’
    • ‘The next administration should also guarantee the two-year term of the prosecutor general and refrain from putting prosecutors under its tight grip through favoritism in personnel management.’
    • ‘According to this view, although the Constitution precludes government favoritism of one religion over another, it does not outlaw government endorsement of religious ideology in general.’
    • ‘But, this program was plagued by agency mismanagement, political favoritism and corruption.’
    • ‘It wasn't just the obvious favouritism towards their own daughter that ticked him off either, that wasn't even the beginning of it.’
    • ‘Another industry practice that may need re-examination, the panelists said, is the role of favoritism and preferential treatment in the newsroom.’
    • ‘Ideally, a way would be found to encourage this official to keep an eye on all contributions, to avoid creating unfair favoritism.’
    • ‘They practiced favoritism, making themselves, their friends and their families rich from the public coffers.’
    • ‘And in the same vein there is a need to do away with corruption, a public disease, nepotism, favouritism, racism and other administrative deterring activities.’
    • ‘But the religious-economies model predicts that religiosity will grow weaker if these monopoly religions retain their political favoritism.’
    • ‘Many of them are serious candidates for the position, but the public will not be informed of who they are in order to eliminate any feelings of bias or favoritism towards particular candidates.’
    • ‘However, in the next night, fifteen of the thirty boxing judges were fired for showing unfair favoritism.’
    • ‘Negotiations have stalled on more than 30 issues, including fair wages and an end to discrimination and favoritism in hiring and promotions.’
    • ‘Under such circumstances, favoritism is practically impossible to conceal, and therefore unlikely to be attempted.’
    • ‘Rivalry between brothers is a central theme of Genesis, fueled always by favoritism and preference for the second-born.’
    • ‘And when I was in office, I was very careful to separate completely any religious commitment of mine and assuring of favoritism or preference to Christianity or my own faith.’
    partiality, partisanship, unfair preference, preferential treatment, special treatment, preference, favour, one-sidedness, prejudice, bias, inequality, unfairness, inequity, discrimination, positive discrimination, reverse discrimination
    View synonyms
  • 2The state or condition of being the competitor thought most likely to win a sporting contest.

    ‘the horse shares favouritism with her French-trained rival at 6-1’
    • ‘They shared favouritism at 2/1.’
    • ‘She completed the double in the seventh race where she shared favouritism at 6/4 with him.’
    • ‘In the fourth event they shared favouritism at 6/4 and they dominated this race from the outset.’
    • ‘Three runners share the overnight favoritism for the Melbourne Cup at odds ranging from 6-to - 1 to 8-to - 1.’
    • ‘They share favouritism for the Grand National Hurdles.’

Pronunciation

favouritism

/ˈfeɪv(ə)rɪtɪz(ə)m/