Definition of fatal in English:

fatal

adjective

  • 1Causing death.

    ‘a fatal accident’
    • ‘It was great beyond measure, lasted a long time and was particularly fatal to children.’
    • ‘The result of a fatal accident inquiry into her death is due later this year.’
    • ‘I looked at the CDC site, and it seems that the disease is not invariably fatal.’
    • ‘The spores transform into the anthrax bacteria, which produce a toxin that can be fatal to humans and animals.’
    • ‘It contains an alkaloid toxin which can be fatal to horses and other livestock.’
    • ‘Once a person develops symptoms, the disease is usually fatal.’
    • ‘They can inflict a serious, and sometimes fatal, injury and should be treated with respect.’
    • ‘Unlike bees they have an unlimited ability to sting, although the venom rarely proves fatal in humans.’
    • ‘The result would be fatal to most motorists as vehicles are likely to be damaged.’
    • ‘Only about 25 of the 1,500 known species of scorpions can deliver stings that are fatal to humans.’
    • ‘Speeding is now a factor in one in four fatal crashes on our roads.’
    • ‘The condition can be fatal if a clot travels to the heart or lungs.’
    • ‘The bug causes diarrhoea, stomach cramps and fever and can be fatal to babies, the old and the sick.’
    • ‘The wound was fatal, but not quick, he would be dying for days.’
    • ‘Rabies is an invariably fatal viral disease caused by the bite of an infected animal, usually a dog.’
    • ‘The last fatal shooting attributed to the sniper took place Tuesday.’
    • ‘He knew it was a fatal wound caused by a special type of ammunition.’
    • ‘But we know they are carrying a deadly parasite which has proved fatal to two species.’
    • ‘This protects the foliage from cold and wind damage as even the walk between shop and car can be fatal to tender plants.’
    • ‘Is it really worth a potentially fatal accident just to avoid having your picture taken?’
    deadly, lethal, mortal, causing death, death dealing, killing
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Leading to failure or disaster.
      ‘there were three fatal flaws in the strategy’
      • ‘Many believe that a second whistleblower could prove fatal to the Government.’
      • ‘Her delay in complaining thus might have been fatal to her claim.’
      • ‘This would be fatal to the central purpose of the BBC, which is to take creative risk.’
      • ‘We say it is fatal to the defendants' case that they cannot prove those accusations to be true.’
      • ‘Thus the Inspector's failure to consider this aspect is not fatal to his decision.’
      • ‘The decision was fatal to what little possibility remained of restoring order in the country.’
      • ‘So, tactically, it is a masterstroke, with one fatal flaw.’
      • ‘However, a couple of fatal flaws in an otherwise solid defence proved costly.’
      • ‘That is why I cannot quite put my finger on what you say is the fatal flaw in this legislation.’
      • ‘What are the fatal flaws that bring him into such contempt among his own peer group?’
      • ‘These could be produced economically and in quantity, but suffered a fatal flaw.’
      • ‘Sometimes it's the way the software is designed that is determined to be the fatal flaw.’
      • ‘However, when I'd finished the process I discovered a fatal flaw in the new software.’
      • ‘That this was never permanently achieved proved fatal to their Mediterranean strategy.’
      • ‘But leaving the film to its own devices proves very nearly fatal.’
      • ‘Those sort of leaders are just as fatal to regimental morale as the control freaks.’
      • ‘It's a fatal flaw in what otherwise has the makings of an entertainingly quirky show.’
      • ‘If you have a lazy agent, it could prove fatal to your dealings with your tenant.’
      • ‘On each occasion, there was the same, potentially fatal, flaw in the system.’
      • ‘They were buoyed up by hope, and often they were brought down their own fatal flaws.’
      disastrous, devastating, ruinous, catastrophic, calamitous, cataclysmic, destructive, grievous, dire, crippling, crushing, injurious, harmful, costly
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the senses ‘destined by fate’ and ‘ominous’): from Old French, or from Latin fatalis, from fatum (see fate).

Pronunciation

fatal

/ˈfeɪt(ə)l/