Definition of fashion in English:



  • 1A popular or the latest style of clothing, hair, decoration, or behaviour.

    ‘the latest Parisian fashions’
    • ‘A special Women's Page appeared in the 1930s where the latest fashion trends in Paris could be found.’
    • ‘And many of those designs are seeing a return to popularity, along with some of the clothing fashions of the day.’
    • ‘Using color forecasting services and other research, each year colors are updated to reflect the latest fashion trends.’
    • ‘Every other fashion programme concentrates on latest fashions and doing hair and make-overs.’
    • ‘Among other popular fashions banned are tank tops (for men), white T-shirts worn as outer garments and midriff-baring shirts.’
    • ‘Western-style clothing fashions swept the country in one generation.’
    • ‘A leather wallet is a must-have fashion accessory that every man should own.’
    • ‘Yet other printed essays and treatises described in detail the latest hair fashions from France and how to achieve them with the assistance of a hairdresser, or friseur.’
    • ‘I love Japanese street fashion for its amazing ability to throw all conventions out the window.’
    • ‘New styles and fashions are created and popularised by it.’
    • ‘The fashions and sensibilities of popular culture contributed to the idea more than anything, even more than the nightly news.’
    • ‘Some late twentieth-century trends in interpretation perhaps reflect the fashions of their day.’
    • ‘Calling all trendsetters - here's the latest in summer fashion accessories and clothing.’
    • ‘I'll take a break from complaining to mention how much I love the fall fashions.’
    • ‘I keep up with the latest trends and fashions, and while my style might not match that of my fellow students, I feel as though adults take me more seriously.’
    • ‘Fads and fashions in body style will come and go at the margin.’
    • ‘She's at the age when kids start to become fashion conscious.’
    • ‘There will also be some men's fashions featured.’
    • ‘Invitation designs follow fashion trends so Jo said the shop has to keep up with the latest styles.’
    • ‘Muslim fashion has become more popular than in the past and has become simple yet chic for both men and women.’
    vogue, trend, craze, rage, mania, mode, fad, fancy, passing fancy
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    1. 1.1[mass noun]The production and marketing of new styles of clothing and cosmetics.
      [as modifier] ‘a fashion magazine’
      • ‘My daughter is a published poet and artist and is studying fashion technology.’
      • ‘We hope that this has been a lesson in smart reading of fashion magazines.’
      • ‘Doing something different in the competitive world of fashion magazines is not easy.’
      • ‘More importantly, he considers himself the world's best fashion photographer.’
      • ‘A whole range of people got together, including people from the fashion industry.’
      • ‘The result is a huge mixture of fashion creativity which varies enormously in quality.’
      • ‘The winner of the crown can now be seen frequently on TV and the covers of fashion magazines.’
      • ‘Her profile recalls Greek classical sculpture as well as fashion mannequins of the period.’
      • ‘Artists and fashion designers are taking over somewhat from the literary types, however.’
      • ‘Fashion designers, including Dolce & Gabbana, have dedicated collections to her.’
      • ‘Nevertheless, covering a war for a women's fashion magazine is surely as surreal as it gets, he acknowledges.’
      • ‘A fashion magazine editor is going to remember them by types of clothing and jewelry worn.’
      • ‘At least four national high street fashion retailers have already expressed an interest in opening in the town alongside Debenhams.’
      • ‘The end result will be like something you have seen in way-out fashion magazines.’
      • ‘However, there are fashion magazines and features put together by professionals, so why step on their toes?’
      • ‘Fashion designers are asking for similar protection for clothing designs for three years.’
      • ‘Like other artists, fashion designers are somewhat sensitive and can be competitive.’
      • ‘She's glad to be working, especially since there's a glut of fashion photographers out there.’
      • ‘It is what has become known as the disposable young fashion market.’
      • ‘The fair this year has invited more than 180 fashion producers from home and overseas.’
      clothes, the clothes industry, clothes design, couture
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  • 2A manner of doing something.

    ‘the work is done in a rather casual fashion’
    • ‘These students understand why a system is designed in a particular fashion and how it works.’
    • ‘Most of you send me fine links and do it in a fashion that tells me you have manners.’
    • ‘Over the years I've collected these anthologies in a rather piecemeal fashion.’
    • ‘As a consequence the Claimants' answers have been provided in a piecemeal fashion.’
    • ‘Ensuring efficient completion of the surgical schedule in a timely fashion is impossible without appropriate instrumentation.’
    • ‘Please exit in an orderly fashion and make your way to the shuttle bay.’
    • ‘Unlike machines, these living systems respond to changes in a non-linear fashion.’
    • ‘To prevent people from seeing videos in a timely fashion is the summit of her achievements so far.’
    • ‘I think that danger may lurk in the background, but it is likely to arise in an indirect fashion, rather than directly.’
    • ‘The right to a fair trial in a timely fashion is one of the cornerstones of our society.’
    • ‘And so I think, overall, it is progressing in an orderly fashion.’
    • ‘There is no danger that the war will be reported in anything approaching an objective fashion.’
    • ‘He would walk up to the middle in a carefree manner, and set about his act in a masterly fashion.’
    • ‘Instead he reforms himself in a public and determined fashion in order to make himself worthy of her.’
    • ‘The 18-hole play-off followed a similar fashion to that of the last round.’
    • ‘Entrepreneurship, meanwhile, is considered only as an afterthought and in piecemeal fashion.’
    • ‘In my usual haphazard fashion, none of them were labeled.’
    • ‘The chairman would like to thank all who attended and behaved in a mannerly fashion.’
    • ‘Largely out of my experience with the Science Council I wanted it to be done in a systematic fashion.’
    • ‘But in the last week he has put those wrongs right in spectacular fashion.’
    manner, way, style, method, mode
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  • 1 Make into a particular form.

    ‘the bottles were fashioned from green glass’
    • ‘The descendants of the Spanish refugees are still fashioning these shutters, especially in the Andalusian quarter of Bizerte.’
    • ‘Back in the days when England was embroiled in the Hundred Years' War against France, a family of notables was fashioning its own chapel in the valley of the River Kent.’
    • ‘Live water plants should be preferred over artificial ones fashioned out of plastic.’
    • ‘He is sitting, fashioning a silent whistle out of wood, he blows it and the dog comes running back.’
    • ‘The opportunity to observe artisans fashioning crystal is not the only reason to visit the Corning Museum of Glass.’
    • ‘He was proud of their collection, and also of those American artists and artisans who had fashioned the objects.’
    • ‘Perhaps it was fashioned of wood or a metal that had been through an alchemical process all its own.’
    • ‘It is said that you can recognise the deft hands that fashioned a doll by looking for telltale signs and shapes on it.’
    • ‘She added that the programmes which assisted young people in fashioning their lives and earning a living were either dissolved or taken away.’
    • ‘He took what they handed him and made it into an idol cast in the shape of a calf, fashioning it with a tool.’
    • ‘The effect was like a writhing smiley face fashioned out of live leeches.’
    • ‘He cleverly fashions a raft and paddles out to the coral reef for some spear fishing.’
    • ‘The couple spent weekends fashioning their tower house.’
    • ‘This was partly, he believed, because he had not courted the public or succeeded in fashioning a charismatic image.’
    • ‘But not everyone found the pivotal moment so memorable while Martin was fashioning this cabinet.’
    • ‘On Saturday however, a welcome victory was fashioned purely from raw talent and endeavour.’
    • ‘In the beginning, he, like most puppeteers, was driven by craft, fashioning puppets to express his artistic impulse.’
    • ‘Journalists seized on the idea that impossible restrictions were to be placed on hand-made toys fashioned by craftsmen for centuries.’
    • ‘He says that fashioning the crown is the most difficult part of the job.’
    • ‘Home-made labels were sometimes fashioned from wood or slate and would likewise have written information.’
    construct, build, manufacture, make, create, fabricate, contrive
    cast, frame, shape, form, mould, sculpt
    forge, hew, carve, whittle, hammer, chisel
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    1. 1.1Use materials to produce (something)
      ‘the skins were fashioned into boots and shoes’
      • ‘Even old railway sleepers have been fashioned into new building material.’
      • ‘What a sight he made when he fashioned his coat-tails into a kind of pouch and hopped about the room imitating a kangaroo.’
      • ‘The fissures between allowed only thin, precise shafts of pale light to strike the trunks and grass, as if the trees were fashioning the sun into a gallery of shapes.’
      • ‘Although Joan does things that some might consider repugnant, Linney fashions her alter-ego into a sympathetic human being.’
      • ‘To show this, they fashioned the material into threads and used them to stitch four incisions on two rats.’
      • ‘It's not hard to picture him sitting on the porch at his Portland home fashioning these reflections into songs.’
      • ‘In one sequence the camera reveals a nurse fashioning a cardboard box into a dead child's makeshift coffin to be strapped to a bicycle.’
      • ‘The finding raises hopes that the new cells can be fashioned into transplantable material for patients whose own cells and tissues have become faulty.’
      • ‘He and his coworkers have already fashioned the fibers into electricity-storage devices called supercapacitors, which they incorporated into ordinary cloth.’
      • ‘Kathryn looked into the mirror that was handed to her and saw that he had fashioned her hair into an elegant bun at the back of her head, wisps of her falling around the tight knob.’
      • ‘He is fashioning a unique gel into contact lenses that change color depending on the glucose levels of the patients.’
      • ‘I am fashioning this material into a visually poetic tribute to his genius.’
      • ‘Thermoelectric materials can be fashioned into devices to create electricity from temperature differences or into solid-state cooling devices.’
      • ‘It fashions these elements into a performance that allows something new to appear, the design of which was not necessarily inevitable.’
      • ‘He fashions these small thoughts into a sprawling 1,500-word polemic - a sort of liberal call-to-arms.’
      • ‘Feeling melancholy, he fashioned the cut reeds into the musical instrument that bears his name - the pan-pipe.’
      • ‘So as I fashioned those stories into the novel, I realized that I was telling a ‘coming of age’ story, which is relatively rare for a black male literary writer.’
      • ‘Though the basic ideas appear to work in three dimensions, engineers will face some challenges fashioning real compounds into such devices, he says.’
      • ‘A few minutes later, they had fashioned the antenna into a makeshift letter U and put it over the cable.’


  • after a fashion

    • To a certain extent but not perfectly.

      ‘he could read after a fashion’
      • ‘They toyed with them after a fashion, and then got back on the bus.’
      • ‘Some of these people I call friends and indeed we still are friends after a fashion.’
      • ‘Having picked up new skills, after a fashion, I'm keen to employ them on a proper mountain tour.’
      • ‘And I've constructed my photograph album, after a fashion.’
      • ‘Strangers think they know you - and they do, after a fashion.’
      • ‘It's a question he's pondered too, after a fashion.’
      • ‘It is sly, clever after a fashion, and undeniably effective.’
      • ‘He had become a traitor to his class - after a fashion.’
      • ‘A few each year go off to college, after a fashion.’
      • ‘Quite a few people come looking for cartoon ducks, and they find them, after a fashion.’
      to a certain extent, in a way, in a rough way, somehow or other, somehow, in an approximate manner, in a manner of speaking, in its way
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  • after (or in) the fashion of

    • In a manner similar to.

      ‘she took servants for granted after the fashion of wealthy girls’
      • ‘He seems genuinely surprised, much after the fashion of people of goodwill who sit on government blue-ribbon commissions everywhere.’
      • ‘She is an eccentric in the fashion of a good many English women who have taken to the East, i.e. a mixture of battiness and extreme practicality.’
      • ‘The two of us hit the road back to my Uncle's and in the fashion of most of our journeys, we turn to song.’
      • ‘In this way I am giving and kind to you, in the fashion of a demi-god.’
      • ‘The trees on the road, always pruned in the fashion of the country, gave almost no shade.’
      • ‘One was a huge tomato, styled in the fashion of a ketchup dispenser in a roadside diner.’
      • ‘It has been built in the fashion of an authentic Irish pub and is very popular among Clevelanders of all ethnic backgrounds.’
      • ‘Modernism in the fashion of James Joyce or Virginia Woolf meant little or nothing to him.’
      • ‘At this point, it is clear that contamination must be censored, and the punishment comes in the fashion of another deviation: that of the gaze of the censor.’
      • ‘Secondly, the bureaucracy handles its affairs after the fashion of the division of labour in manufacturing.’
      in the style of, in the manner of, in imitation of, on the model of, following the pattern of, after the fashion of, along the lines of, on the lines of, influenced by
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  • in (or out of) fashion

    • Popular (or unpopular) and considered (or not considered) to be smart at the time in question.

      ‘the Sixties look is back in fashion’
      ‘extreme designs go out of fashion as quickly as they come in’
      • ‘I tune in for the fashion firsts, the fashion faux pas, and to see what's in fashion.’
      • ‘Purely by chance, she chose a colour that would never go out of fashion.’
      • ‘More recently, though, stage directions have fallen out of fashion.’
      • ‘Baroque art, which fell out of fashion in the mid-1700s, was a particularly popular target.’
      • ‘In their place, remodelers often had to use whatever happened to be in fashion at the moment.’
      • ‘Cultural figures go out of fashion for all sorts of sometimes quite arbitrary reasons.’
      • ‘The clothes in this store were exactly like her, bizarre and so out of fashion that they were cool.’
      • ‘They can be worn for weeks until they go out of fashion, after which they can be unceremoniously discarded.’
      • ‘Politics, we keep being told, is out of fashion because nobody addresses the really tough questions that matter.’
      • ‘Sherlock Holmes is a permanent fixture in popular culture, and he is particularly in fashion at the moment.’
      fashionable, in vogue, up to date, up to the minute, all the rage, bang up to date
      smart, chic, elegant
      de rigueur, à la mode
      trendy, with it, cool, in, the in thing, hot, big, hip, happening, now, sharp, groovy, mod, swinging
      kicking, tony, fly
      all the go
      unfashionable, out of style, no longer fashionable, old-fashioned, out of date, outdated, dated, outmoded, behind the times, last year's, superseded
      unstylish, unpopular
      passé, démodé
      old hat, out, square, out of the ark, old school
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Middle English (in the sense ‘make, shape, appearance’, also ‘a particular make or style’): from Old French façon, from Latin factio(n-), from facere do, make.