Definition of fanfare in English:

fanfare

noun

  • 1A short ceremonial tune or flourish played on brass instruments, typically to introduce something or someone important.

    ‘a specially composed fanfare announced the arrival of the Duchess’
    • ‘Trumpets of various types were used in organized armies from Ancient Egypt onwards, to give signals in camp or battle and to sound fanfares on ceremonial occasions.’
    • ‘It builds to a furious pace with something like a brass fanfare at one point.’
    • ‘This is a set of twenty-nine short pieces, most truly titled ‘Trumpet Tunes,’ but also ‘trumpet’ voluntaries, fanfares and processions.’
    • ‘Then, there was an important-sounding fanfare, and a mellifluous announcer introduced the first Guest of Honour talk.’
    • ‘From the opening brass fanfares to the insouciance of the finale, the piece evokes images of mounted guardsmen, band shells in Bath, kids with pennywhistles, and even the elegiac promptings of night.’
    • ‘On the glass panel of the telephone box a lithe figure of ambiguous gender was blowing a trumpet fanfare to celebrate his arrival.’
    • ‘The festive mood is set by the fanfare of trumpets and bells in the arrangement by London's Roger Harvey.’
    • ‘Brass fanfares in the manner of Janácek's Sinfonietta mark the ‘Dance of Brutality’.’
    • ‘The opening movement combines a brass fanfare with a Widorian toccata figure for its music argument.’
    • ‘Originally improvised (as distinct from military signals), fanfares are used for ceremonial purposes, for example to announce the entrance of a dignitary, and are characterized by reliance on the harmonic series.’
    • ‘Brass fanfares and skirling strings back Ashcroft's voice.’
    • ‘A fanfare of trumpets announced the arrival of the king and everyone stood.’
    • ‘The first movement opens with a striking fanfare, and fanfares return in the otherwise peaceful finale, and overall, the mood is heroic, but without militarism or Soviet bombast.’
    • ‘In the spirit of Shostakovich's last symphony, Vainberg quotes trumpet fanfares from well-known works by Rimsky-Korsakov, Bizet, and Mendelssohn.’
    • ‘Boldly modern trumpet fanfares (à la Shostakovich's First Piano Concerto) resound in the ‘Dance of Poison’.’
    • ‘First came the fanfare of pipe bands, brass bands and tenors.’
    • ‘The president of the bullfight signals for the first bull to be released whereupon the fanfare of trumpets from the brass band also ends the paso doble (popular two beat dance music).’
    • ‘Arthur Bliss, whose music I'd like to know more of, is represented by two spectacular ceremonial fanfares, which he wrote as Master of the Queen's Musick for the wedding of Princess Margaret.’
    • ‘All at once, Wormhole Square resounded with a fanfare of trumpets as heralds announced the arrival of a notable procession.’
    • ‘Through a chromatic mist of string ostinatos, a plainsong chorale gradually emerges in the brass climaxing in resplendent fanfares, before fading away into a haze of sound as the procession recedes.’
    peal of trumpets, flourish, fanfaronade, trumpet call, trumpet blare
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    1. 1.1mass noun Media attention or elaborate ceremony.
      ‘the studio released this film with great fanfare but no commercial success’
      • ‘Amidst the usual media fanfare, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced the nominations for its annual Oscar awards Tuesday morning.’
      • ‘A book detailing the Three Represents was published last week to great fanfare in the official media, even though the theory was first announced more than a year ago.’
      • ‘So what is going on with the new EU members - they have only been members for six weeks and enjoyed all the hype and fanfare of joining - but firstly they couldn't be bothered to turn out to vote.’
      • ‘Last year, Microsoft shipped Windows Media Center to much public fanfare but less than glowing reviews.’
      • ‘WITHOUT MUCH fanfare, the Malayalam film industry is slowly returning to the world of arc lights amidst no signs of an end to the ongoing crisis involving trade bodies and artistes.’
      • ‘In Judaism the most heroic acts were done in private, with no fanfare, publicity or showiness - qualities that represent the essence of modesty.’
      • ‘More important from a predictive point of view, the Amex Oil Index, made a five year high when it closed above 610 on April 16, with little fanfare from the major media.’
      • ‘One project that is seemingly outstripping all others is Airbus's A380, introduced in a fanfare about eight years ago but is due for its first flight this year.’
      • ‘Some of the biggest names in Bollywood showed up to shower their blessings on as they celebrated their sangeet ceremony with great fanfare.’
      • ‘On that memorable day, the National Constitution Center museum was opened in Philadelphia amidst great fanfare and national attention.’
      • ‘The 22-year-old arrived without huge fanfare or any of the media lobbying that normally accompanies the promotion of a fresh face.’
      • ‘They train every day, without fanfare or public attention.’
      • ‘In numerous cases, there is a great media fanfare as the police herald the arrest of a so-called terrorist cell, only for the case to be quietly dropped days, weeks or months later.’
      • ‘Initially, the MAI negotiations had begun in the fall of 1995 with little attention or public fanfare.’
      • ‘With a lot of fanfare and plenty of media exposure, his Jet2 airline took to the skies just over a week ago for its inaugural destination of Amsterdam.’
      • ‘Wellingtonians just get on with things, without fuss or fanfare.’
      • ‘Many feel that the media fanfare surrounding your divorce hurt your career.’
      • ‘Hospital visits to comfort sick kids have been regular, but done without any media fanfare.’
      • ‘The Québec government and Makivik Corporation signed a framework agreement on a new government for Nunavik, with little media fanfare or public ceremony.’
      • ‘The launch of Windows 2000 last week was not accompanied by the usual fanfare of hype and publicity surrounding the launch of a Microsoft operating environment.’
      • ‘How did this elitist come to write a set of stories that at the last count have sold some 80m copies and are about to come to the cinema screens with as much fanfare and hype as Tolkien's Lord of the Rings received?’
      • ‘Secondly, with a lot of media fanfare, an impression was created that there would be a far-reaching reshuffle of permanent secretaries and this would be a new era of public service.’
      • ‘It was November of 1919 before the outcome of the eclipse analysis was made public, with great fanfare in London.’
      • ‘These events are formally managed by the states holding the Council presidency and are finalized - amidst much media fanfare - at a European Council by the heads of state and government.’
      • ‘ABOUT FIVE YEARS AGO the University of Adelaide circulated the university's new strategic plan with much fanfare and hype.’
      fuss, commotion, stir, show, showiness, display, ostentation, flashiness, publicity, sensationalism, pageantry, splendour, hubbub, brouhaha
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Origin

Mid 18th century: from French, ultimately of imitative origin.

Pronunciation

fanfare

/ˈfanfɛː/