Main definitions of fallow in English

: fallow1fallow2

fallow1

adjective

  • 1(of farmland) ploughed and harrowed but left for a period without being sown in order to restore its fertility or to avoid surplus production.

    ‘incentives for farmers to let land lie fallow’
    • ‘Wormers must now record their daily haul, and they are required to harvest the worms on a rotational basis, leaving some beaches to lie fallow for a season.’
    • ‘A third of Russia's arable land lies fallow and production costs are one-third lower than those for American wheat farmers.’
    • ‘Should we be attempting to develop the site as a public amenity and cultural resource or should we simply leave the land to lie fallow for future generations to exploit?’
    • ‘Chen told the Taipei Times that it was unnecessary to let fields lie fallow because the peak irrigation demand period was almost over.’
    • ‘The council argued, however, that as it had not had any use for the plot, other than to let it lie fallow until the road scheme could go ahead, the possession of Mr Moran and his predecessors had not been adverse to the council's rights.’
    • ‘At what point do you switch priorities from irrigating the existing crops to pre-moistening the fallow fields in preparation for stale bedding or getting your seeds to sprout?’
    • ‘The Council of Agriculture has designated 2,000 hectares of fallow farmland for the growing of biomass crops including canola, soybeans and sunflowers next year, officials said yesterday.’
    • ‘The Government should pass a law that allows no land to lie fallow.’
    • ‘The shorter fallow period means less fertility in the soil and more weeds in the fields.’
    • ‘‘When you grow those crops, it's like a fallow period, because glomalin production stops,’ says Wright.’
    • ‘These lands were retained for agricultural use, but the peripheral areas and the poorest or the heaviest were left to lie fallow, often until the assarting from the waste in the eleventh and twelfth centuries.’
    • ‘Greater volatile loss was due to more manure applied to grassland, whereas leaching loss decreased with the elimination of manure applied to fallow corn land.’
    • ‘Another local farmer, David Wagers, changed the rotations on his 6,000-acre farm from a wheat / fallow rotation partly because of the research coming from Akron.’
    • ‘Starting in the 1930s the betterment schemes forced families into villages and turned their farmland to grazing or left it to lie fallow.’
    • ‘The current levels of expenditure were not reduced, because farmers were compensated with income supports, including set-aside payments for leaving cultivated land to lie fallow.’
    • ‘They can't let fields lie fallow to build up nutrients and to keep weed infestations manageable, and they can't afford chemical fertilizers and pesticides.’
    • ‘Excess use of fertilisers have rendered lands fallow.’
    • ‘In many cases, fertility can be restored using crop rotation and fallow practices.’
    • ‘Space between his mangos was let to lie fallow for most of the year, planting vegetables between them when the rains came.’
    • ‘If there is little or no crop residue, such as when the previous crop was removed for hay or silage, it won't work well to use herbicide for weed control for the entire fallow period.’
    uncultivated, unploughed, untilled, unplanted, unsown, unseeded, unused, undeveloped, dormant, resting, empty, bare, virgin
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1(of a period of time) characterized by inaction; unproductive.
      ‘long fallow periods when nothing seems to happen’
      • ‘During a fallow period in my research in Bolivia (ok, I was broke) I worked in La Britannia, Bolivia's only British pub.’
      • ‘Bairnsdale reached the finals again in 1983 before enduring more than a decade of fallow seasons.’
      • ‘In the boom and bust of the 1980s and early 1990s, property developers began lending spaces to artist-run initiatives, rather than let them lie fallow: this was a way of enlivening the shells of unlet buildings.’
      • ‘That's a very complicated question - I just have to, I guess - though not all the time - I alternate periods of productivity with extended fallow periods.’
      • ‘I have had periods where I've had work I found extremely satisfying and challenging, and I've had real fallow periods that felt scary.’
      • ‘Fortunately his talents were not allowed to lie fallow, and he was encouraged to excavate sites across the island, using the labour of fellow internees.’
      • ‘When places are torn down they lie fallow for a time.’
      • ‘A resurgence in fur wearing in the 1980s - after a relatively fallow period of animal cruelty for the sake of fashion - galvanised the anti-fur lobby into one of its most successful campaigns.’
      • ‘Professional councillors should be elected at a reasonable salary and elections should be held every year for one-third of the councillors with a fallow year as is the system in many parts of the country already.’
      • ‘The deal underscores a solid revival in the mergers and acquisitions market after the fallow years that followed the collapse of the technology boom.’
      • ‘But as so often happens, Wood's career soared while Wagner's hit a fallow period, and the fairytale marriage collapsed.’
      • ‘He said: ‘We have been in a fallow period until now but we are moving up a gear in the autumn.’’
      • ‘It asks questions society still has not begun to debate, and will probably allow to lie fallow until Something occurs that thrusts us all directly into the very problems we're not considering.’
      • ‘The bigger question is, how the hell can a company like Warner Bros. continue to allow their biggest feature franchises to lie fallow year after year after year.’
      • ‘Similarly, he wrote songs, in the fallow period following his Christian phase, in which he took on the role of an accusing social commentator.’
      • ‘Even though the Stones have been in what you might call a creatively fallow period, we want to hear them more than ever.’
      • ‘At the same time they chide Nokia for letting huge opportunities lie fallow.’
      • ‘In case the Governor hasn't noticed, if history repeats, and it has so far, Australia's house prices are generally about 12 months into the 7 year price fallow period.’
      • ‘I'd love to be able to use my creative bits more in the day, and not let them lie fallow until ‘one day‘.’
      • ‘You do go through fallow periods but my energy is great at the moment.’
  • 2(of a sow) not pregnant.

    • ‘I would have a couple of fallow pigs for big celebrations, and a few chickens scratching around on the ground and roosting on my porch.’

noun

  • A piece of fallow land.

    ‘a great estate was usually divided between fallows, grazed stubble, and wheat’
    [mass noun] ‘strips of summer fallow’
    • ‘Tilling and fertilizing summer fallow and finishing wheat harvest are the main field activities.’
    • ‘There are other practices known to store carbon, including minimizing or eliminating fallow, planting winter cover crops, and maintaining buffer zones.’
    • ‘Other field work includes spraying for weeds in wheat, disking wheat stubble for summer fallow, preparing seedbed for spring seeded crops like proso millet and planting irrigated corn.’
    • ‘Much of his current research program focuses on strategies to reduce or eliminate the use of summer fallow in dryland crop rotations in the Nebraska Panhandle.’
    • ‘Most herbicide applications during fallow will eliminate two tillage operations.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Leave (land) fallow for a period.

    ‘fallow the ground for a week or so after digging’
    • ‘If sufficient soil water is available the following spring, corn could be planted or if moisture is limited, the field could be fallowed and winter wheat could be planted in the fall.’
    • ‘Nitrogen mineralisation was measured by aerobic incubation of soil that had been fallowed or had grown annual crops (wheat, canola) or perennial pastures.’
    • ‘The mean total dry matter yield at the 1963 harvest was significantly higher (P
    • ‘The FWS had prohibited ‘disking’ firebreaks and farming in designated rat habitat, and the Domenigonis had allowed rat habitat to grow by fallowing their fields.’
    • ‘It was often planted on land that formerly had been fallowed.’

Origin

Old English fealgian ‘to break up land for sowing’, of Germanic origin; related to Low German falgen.

Pronunciation:

fallow

/ˈfaləʊ/

Main definitions of fallow in English

: fallow1fallow2

fallow2

noun

  • [mass noun] A pale brown or reddish yellow colour.

    [count noun] ‘possible feather colours include fallows, pieds, and yellows’
    • ‘Pure bischofite crystals are aquatic-transparent, but may also be of white, rose and fallow colour depending on impurities.’
    • ‘Its wood, which is very heavy and of a fallow colour, has the grain and smell of ebony.’

Origin

Old English falu, fealu, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch vaal and German fahl, falb.

Pronunciation:

fallow

/ˈfaləʊ/