Definition of fairy tale in English:

fairy tale

noun

  • 1A children's story about magical and imaginary beings and lands; a fairy story.

    • ‘Whether it was true or not, I preferred it to remain a fairy tale - like that of Santa Claus.’
    • ‘All of this so far might sound like a fairy tale had it not been for a tragic surprise.’
    • ‘Swan Lake was based on a German fairy tale and set to music by Tchaikovsky.’
    • ‘He spent summers at Bridge House in Arncliffe and was inspired by the dales to write his fairy tale The Water Babies.’
    • ‘Vikas Rai Chauhan has brought alive a fairy tale of Hansel and Gretel in the celebrations.’
    • ‘My favourite fairy tale was The Little Mermaid and that was because Ariel got her prince just by loving him.’
    • ‘Its ideal form is the fairy tale, a container of myth related in the simplest language.’
    • ‘It is not often I compare my life to a fairy tale but I'm feeling like a character from Hans Christian Andersen.’
    • ‘In the fairy tale, the match girl, unable to sell any matches, freezes to death in the street.’
    • ‘It has a charm and simplicity you'd expect to find in a fairy tale.’
    • ‘As such, it may be a fairy tale but it has a good pedagogical ring to it.’
    • ‘The Emperor's New Clothes is a very literal title, having nothing to do with the fairy tale.’
    • ‘There's constant repetition which, at times, gives the writing the soothing familiarity of a fairy tale.’
    • ‘She was due to play Cinderella in a school rendition of the classic fairy tale, but shocked staff cancelled the production.’
    • ‘The impression that I got from the movie was that it was only based on the fairy tale.’
    • ‘It is a fairy tale with very rich, detailed characters who have history and depth to them.’
    • ‘I dreamed of living in a flat like that and used to spend hours looking at the pictures like a child immersed in a fairy tale.’
    • ‘This is a satisfying variation on the usual fairy tale in which knights compete for the hand of a princess.’
    • ‘Now is an entirely new place, as though I had stepped through a window into a fairy tale.’
    • ‘The snow abruptly stops and the world has changed into marzipan, the fairy tale complete.’
    fairy story, folk tale, folk story, traditional story, myth, legend, romance, fantasy, fable, fiction
    folk tale, folk story, traditional story, myth, legend, romance, fantasy, fable, fiction
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    1. 1.1often as modifier Something resembling a fairy tale in being magical, idealized, or extremely happy.
      ‘a fairy-tale romance’
      • ‘This subtle but persistent political theme is well served by the author's tart humor, as is the fairy-tale romance.’
      • ‘Barns Tower, with its cosy lounge and fairy-tale bedroom, is the perfect winter hideaway, writes Sophie Cooke’
      • ‘It is a fairy-tale moment for a modern-day Cinderella.’
      • ‘We've been together for over ten years now, and it's still a fairy-tale romance.’
      • ‘Our room is a fairy-tale palace: four balconies, two planter chairs, a cane sofa set, a piano - yes, a piano!’
      • ‘Jack suspected she was rather taken with the romantic fairy-tale figure he cut.’
      • ‘And she's locked in the fight of her life to keep her fairy-tale fortune her own.’
      • ‘In the old city is a wealth of Muslim architecture and fairy-tale Nizam palaces, including one that's now a hospital.’
      • ‘In my case, it's something to do with a childhood longing to be a fairy-tale princess - and fairy tale princesses were never brunette.’
      • ‘It is a fairy-tale kingdom without class warfare, racial violence, or religious hypocrisy.’
      • ‘In true fairy-tale fashion, the book was an immediate success.’
      • ‘From as far as Poland to as close as Punjab - musicians from all corners of the globe are descending on Delhi to give a fairy-tale finale to this year.’
      • ‘I can't buy the fairy-tale presentation of Em we see in the film because it's completely at odds with what he's worked so hard to make us believe about him up til now.’
      • ‘Vidocq's great achievement was to confer his magical, fairy-tale prestige on a branch of government administration.’
      • ‘Refreshed, we decide upon the long walk up to the fairy-tale clocktower atop the hill overlooking the town.’
      • ‘It's been a fairy-tale story to go from club coach to national coach in the sport I love.’
      • ‘Last week Mittal held a fairy-tale wedding for his one and only daughter, Vanisha.’
      • ‘His eyes twinkle like a fairy-tale grandfather's in his round, tanned face and he makes a kind of slurping, appreciative sound.’
      • ‘The truth is that fairy-tale endings are probably very few and far between.’
      • ‘They're making over brides and their fiancés to create the ultimate fairy-tale weddings.’
    2. 1.2 A fabricated story, especially one intended to deceive.
      • ‘They had their fairy tales, of course, but they were grossly inaccurate pieces of fiction that had long since strayed from the actual facts.’
      • ‘That strikes me as a fairy tale.’
      • ‘And that was a big surprise to many people who expected Russia Today to go and tell all the fairy tales about Russia to the world.’
      • ‘Just don't start believing the fairytales about spring records meaning anything.’
      • ‘This whole thing is the biggest fairy tale I've ever seen.’
      • ‘As the UN report demonstrates, it was all a horrible fairy tale.’
      lie, white lie, fib, half-truth, untruth, falsity, falsehood, story, tall story, fairy story, tall tale, made-up story, trumped-up story, fake news, fabrication, invention, piece of fiction, falsification, alternative fact
      lie, white lie, fib, half-truth, untruth, falsity, falsehood, story, tall story, tall tale, made-up story, trumped-up story, fake news, fabrication, alternative fact, invention, piece of fiction, falsification
      View synonyms

Pronunciation

fairy tale