Definition of faggot in English:

faggot

noun

  • 1North American informal, offensive A male homosexual.

  • 2US A bundle of sticks bound together as fuel.

    • ‘She threw an extra fagot in the fire and when she examined him, Raine noticed for the first time how young he really was.’
    • ‘Are you are aware that faggot means bundle of sticks?’
    • ‘Harder rocks were broken down by ‘fire-setting’, a process in which the rock face was heated by burning faggots against it, and then quenched with water, causing the rock to fracture.’
    • ‘Trade union boss Ernie Bevin lit the faggots to his political funeral pyre in October 1935 at Labour's Brighton conference, in a ferocious speech which had Virginia Woolf in tears.’
    • ‘Between the Neanderthal's bundle of burning faggots and the blinding blue glare of the modern headlight, man has brightened the darkness in a number of ingenious ways.’
    • ‘When the plotters breached the cellars at Westminster, Fawkes set the explosives under a pile of faggots.’
    bunch, roll, clump, wad, parcel, packet, package, pack, sheaf, bale, bolt, truss, faggot, fascicle
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    1. 2.1A bundle of iron rods bound together for reheating, welding, and hammering into bars.
      • ‘These faggots are placed in the forge hearth until they have attained a strong welding heat.’
      • ‘The faggots of blistered steel are made by binding in a bundle, around a bar of double that length, four pieces of eighteen inches long, which are secured in their positions by a small band of wrought iron, which is subsequently removed.’
  • 3British A ball or roll of seasoned chopped liver, baked or fried.

    • ‘Their innate modesty is expressed in their alternative names - rissoles, patties, faggots - and a complete absence of trend-setting ingredients such as mizuna, enoki, frog's legs and mascarpone.’
    • ‘We know people love to see local products, and in Bristol we sell faggots and in Lancashire we sell local cheese.’
    • ‘With the fat left on, it can be used as a filling for andouilles, or it can be scraped to make a convenient flat sheet of casing which can be made into parcels around a faggot or other items.’
    • ‘Cornish pasties and Lancashire faggots are among the culinary terms defined between the covers of the top dictionary.’
    • ‘A year later, steamed faggots arrived, ushering in the golden age of faggots, chips and peas in a tray.’
    • ‘Made from quality pork liver and pork, Mr Brain's faggots are prepared in a delicious West Country sauce and are available in major supermarkets nationwide in packs of two, four and six.’
    • ‘It usually disappears - in England, as in France - with the rest of the pluck (heart, liver, lungs) into faggots, sausages and pâtés.’
    • ‘Spare a thought, by the way, for the home cooks of America, making their way through British cookbooks filled with bangers, faggots and bashed neeps.’
    • ‘The move came after complaints were aired about a Somerfield advert which mentioned faggots, a meat dish normally served with peas.’
    • ‘His faggots were legendary. ‘We opened in 1994; eight months later, we had a Michelin star, one of the fastest ever to be won.’’
  • 4British informal, dated An unpleasant or contemptible woman.

    • ‘A faggot woman was dismissed as one would dismiss a bundle of sticks.’
    • ‘The word took an approbrious turn sometime in the 16th century, when faggot became an abusive nickname for a woman.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1archaic Bind in or make into faggots.

  • 2(in embroidery) join by faggoting.

    • ‘Featherstitch or feather stitch and Cretan stitch or faggoting stitch are embroidery techniques made of open, looped stitches worked alternately to the right and left of a central rib.’
    • ‘Fascinated by ancient styles of construction, Zhang has made lavish use of symmetrization, bias-cutting, pleating, carving, lace-trimming, embroidering, fagoting, sequinning and beading.’
    • ‘Open Cretan stitch or faggoting is used in making open decorative seams and to attach insertions.’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘bundle of sticks for fuel’): from Old French fagot, from Italian fagotto, based on Greek phakelos bundle.

Pronunciation:

faggot

/ˈfaɡət/