Main definitions of fadge in English

: fadge1fadge2

fadge1

noun

mass nounNorthern Irish
  • Bread made with potatoes, flour, and butter formed into scones.

    ‘fadge is an indispensable part of the Ulster fry’
    • ‘Add some fadge to your bacon and you have the famous ‘Ulster fry’, common throughout the North.’
    • ‘He'd had fadge for breakfast and lunch.’
    • ‘Fadge dough is prepared with mashed boiled potatoes and a little white flour and baked in farls on a pan or griddle.’
    • ‘You just can't beat two farls of fadge fried with an egg.’
    • ‘He was hoping that Rory had smuggled in some soda and fadge to help celebrate further.’

Origin

Early 17th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

fadge

/fadʒ/

Main definitions of fadge in English

: fadge1fadge2

fadge2

noun

NZ, Australian
  • An unpressed pack of wool containing less than a bale.

    ‘they drove to a second buyer and sold two fadges of wool’
    • ‘Police are investigating whether the two fadges of wool in the wrecked car were stolen.’
    • ‘Stunned staff at the fuel stop heard a loud crash and saw the cab on its side, although the trailer, loaded with about 100 fadges of wool stayed upright.’
    • ‘We manage to load three big fadges of wool onto the back of Bob's double cab.’
    • ‘What has more value in the marketplace — a fadge of wool or a sugar sack of possum fur?’
    • ‘We held our opening wool sale of the season today, and offered an attractive catalogue of 333 bales and 122 fadges to a fair attendance of buyers.’

Origin

Late 16th century (originally English dialect): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

fadge

/fadʒ/