Definition of factor something in (or out) in English:

factor something in (or out)

phrasal verb

  • Include (or exclude) something as a relevant element when making a decision.

    ‘when the psychological costs are factored in, a different picture will emerge’
    • ‘Puppeteers argue their fees are low if their working hours are factored in, including preparation for the show and the cleanup.’
    • ‘He estimates the budget at $20,000 in cash and donations, and well over ten times that much if actor, location, music, and crew contributions are factored in.’
    • ‘Courts Service chief executive officer PJ Fitzpatrick said they did not see the original lease until much later and were unaware refurbishment costs were factored in to the rental price.’
    • ‘Union officials estimated that when factors such as the cost of health benefits were factored in, the company's proposal amounted to a 40 cent per hour pay cut.’
    • ‘When anxieties, other fears and sleep disturbances were factored in, the prevalence of depression among all women increased to about 16%.’
    • ‘After capital gains are factored in, home owners made a gain of £5,000, which he says shows that it remains overwhelmingly advantageous to buy rather than to rent.’
    • ‘This figure holds after many other influences are factored out.’
    • ‘The Department of Education had estimated the bill for compensation would reach €508m, rising to €610m when legal and administration costs were factored in.’
    • ‘Air conditioning costs are factored out, so the drop isn't a reflection of the cooler spring.’
    • ‘Every time we hear of an interest rate hike, people at home, consumers, people like you and me, want to know how does that affect us, and how long before the hike is factored in?’