Main definitions of faction in English

: faction1faction2

faction1

noun

  • 1A small organized dissenting group within a larger one, especially in politics.

    ‘the left-wing faction of the party’
    • ‘Suffice it to say that I come from a large family, in which three different political factions existed.’
    • ‘At the site, battle soon erupted between three different rival factions.’
    • ‘With him gone, the factions are all fighting to gain the upper hand in a well and truly divided Cabinet.’
    • ‘The idea of a competition for power among political factions was regarded with distaste.’
    • ‘These days the factions hate one other, for the most part, simply because they have always hated one another.’
    • ‘Since then, factions of moderates and hardliners have battled within the movement.’
    • ‘Most, if not all, of the contentious points have been resolved by the factions in the House.’
    • ‘The candidates of the various factions of this one party system rely on vast sums of money to prevail.’
    • ‘In my office, there are two warring factions maintaining an uneasy truce.’
    • ‘Diplomacy, as you would expect from an executive answering to two family factions, is a Kiely strong suit.’
    • ‘His father was able to control the various cliques and factions through nepotism and bribes.’
    • ‘Close friendships between boarders and day boys was rare; both factions preferred their own.’
    • ‘Not the least of the current president's successes has been to keep the diverse factions of his party united.’
    • ‘Violence and intimidation were almost daily occurrences as the various factions vied for territory.’
    • ‘Pedro used these powers when he could not compel political factions or parties to do his bidding.’
    • ‘The House factions must work together to find at least a win-win solution to the deadlock.’
    • ‘The worrying thing is that it's other factions within that same team who are doing the whispering.’
    • ‘The country suffered as various factions within the ruling elite lobbied for power.’
    • ‘The two also have not reached an agreement as to how to deal with the other armed factions.’
    • ‘Keeping the warring factions behaving in a civilised fashion can be a very difficult job.’
    clique, coterie, caucus, cabal, bloc, camp, group, grouping, side, sector, section, wing, arm, branch, division, contingent, set, ring, lobby
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[mass noun]Dissension within an organization.
      ‘a council increasingly split by faction’
      • ‘The most interesting features of federalist thought have to do with the suppression of faction.’
      • ‘They should instead realize that faction and division are healthy for democracy and necessary for intellectual growth.’
      • ‘Do you feel that whole idea of faction within the Union movement is breaking down?’
      • ‘What leads us into faction is passion, which is the ability of feeling to overwhelm thought, and interest, which is the ability of need and desire to overwhelm thought.’
      • ‘Forgetfulness breeds ingratitude; ingratitude breeds faction; and faction leads to civil war.’

Origin

Late 15th century (denoting the action of doing or making something): via French from Latin factio(n-), from facere do, make.

Pronunciation:

faction

/ˈfakʃ(ə)n/

Main definitions of faction in English

: faction1faction2

faction2

noun

  • [mass noun] A literary and cinematic genre in which real events are used as a basis for a fictional narrative or dramatization.

    ‘the current vogue for faction seems about to overwhelm narrative history’
    • ‘Here we have a literary form that attempts to bridge the gap between fact and fiction, or faction, something like historical fiction.’
    • ‘No, I'll tell you several stories that will help explain the difference between fact and fiction and its composite, faction.’

Origin

1960s: blend of fact and fiction.

Pronunciation:

faction

/ˈfakʃ(ə)n/