Definition of extrovert in English:

extrovert

(also extravert)

noun

  • 1An outgoing, socially confident person.

    • ‘If you are outgoing, an extrovert, then consider careers that give you a chance to be in the spotlight such as management, politics or teaching.’
    • ‘Natural extroverts have had the benefit of a lifetime's experience and are perfectly at home in their ‘charged’ state.’
    • ‘‘Dick's an extrovert who is passionately committed to football,’ offers Ian.’
    • ‘Also, I don't think that it's safe to assume that extroverts have particularly effective social skills.’
    • ‘Still, we endure stoically, because the etiquette books - written, no doubt, by extroverts - regard declining to banter as rude and gaps in conversation as awkward.’
    • ‘If he were a spy, he certainly did not stand out from the crowd, though some have described him as an extrovert.’
    • ‘Instead, it's a private party with added cars, attracting extroverts and speed freaks from various walks of life: motorsport professionals, models, musicians, artists.’
    • ‘Stravynski's gang has transformed many wallflowers into extroverts.’
    • ‘There are also shy extroverts, who function well in typical social situations but become diffident in intimate encounters or in situations where it is not possible to follow a social script.’
    • ‘Introverts have figured out that if they leave socializing to the extroverts they'll end up at the bottom of the pile.’
    • ‘I always thought extroverts had more than 3 friends.’
    • ‘Are there canny advantages to being socially averse that the extroverts among us never see?’
    • ‘Ida Worthington, and her husband Fred, who died 15 years ago, were larger-than-life extroverts.’
    • ‘Of course, I was around a large crowd of extroverts, and my being the only quiet one in the group had its down sides.’
    • ‘In taste terms, it was almost over-the-top, like having too many extroverts at a dinner party, spirited but good fun.’
    • ‘Anyhow, the people there are so different to my colleagues and many of my friends who are largely creative extroverts.’
    • ‘The extroverts need to socialize, the introverts dread it.’
    • ‘On the surface he was an optimistic extrovert, preaching freedom of conscience and religion; but underneath he was a brooding pessimist, with intransigent, darkly mystical views about the drama of human history and sexuality.’
    • ‘On the other hand, there are also children who are complete extroverts and very confident.’
    • ‘I've always been an extrovert, the joker in the pack,’ he admits.’
    outgoing person, sociable person, life and soul of the party, socializer, mixer, mingler, social butterfly, socialite, party animal
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    1. 1.1Psychology A person predominantly concerned with external things or objective considerations.
      Compare with introvert
      • ‘Other psychologists using different methods have, like me, found that everyone is either an introvert or an extrovert, though not all of these psychologists use those terms.’
      • ‘Background music can help extroverts focus, but tends to torment introverts.’
      • ‘Whereas the extravert is oriented primarily to events in the outer world, the introvert is primarily concerned with the inner world.’
      • ‘Researchers measured extraversion and introversion among participants with a standard questionnaire and then compared extraverts to introverts by correlating the extraversion score to the strength of the positive-affect boost.’
      • ‘Interestingly, the biggest liars were extroverts.’

adjective

  • Relating to, denoting, or typical of an extrovert.

    ‘his extrovert personality made him the ideal host’
    • ‘I'm much more outgoing and extrovert, like an excited Labrador.’
    • ‘I also worked with the costume designer, the make-up girl and the hairdresser to define a look that matched Julie's extrovert personality.’
    • ‘Even the most extrovert social butterfly sometimes needs to flutter away from the public gaze.’
    • ‘Standing in front of a camera with that much flesh on show I suppose you've got to be pretty extrovert and confident.’
    • ‘A very jolly extrovert personality, Eileen enjoys the social aspect of the game and she is hugely popular with her sporting friends.’
    outgoing, hail-fellow-well-met, extroverted, sociable, gregarious, socializing, social, genial, cordial, affable, friendly, people-oriented, lively, exuberant, uninhibited, unreserved, demonstrative
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Usage

The original spelling extravert is now rare in general use but is found in technical use in psychology

Origin

Early 20th century: from extro- (variant of extra-, on the pattern of intro-) + Latin vertere ‘to turn’.

Pronunciation

extrovert

/ˈɛkstrəvəːt/