Definition of extrinsic in English:

extrinsic

adjective

  • 1Not part of the essential nature of someone or something; coming or operating from outside.

    ‘a complex interplay of extrinsic and intrinsic factors’
    ‘reasons extrinsic to the music itself’
    • ‘Different extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors might be involved in the etiology of these injuries.’
    • ‘To account for this consistency through transpositional evolutionary changes, both intrinsic and extrinsic factors can be evoked.’
    • ‘Other workers have, however, tended to view the diversifications as resulting from a complex mix of intrinsic biological and extrinsic physical factors.’
    • ‘Causes can include intrinsic factors, such as high seed set, or extrinsic factors, such as a loss of competitors or herbivores.’
    • ‘Motivation can be intrinsic (from the student) and extrinsic (from external factors).’
    • ‘It is unconditionally envisaged as homogeneous extension, extrinsic to the distributions which occupy it.’
    • ‘Only bourgeois art, which has become autonomous in the face of demands of employment extrinsic to art, has taken up positions on behalf of the victims of bourgeois rationalization.’
    • ‘Little is known about individual variation in repair rates or about intrinsic or extrinsic factors that modulate repair activity.’
    • ‘He castigates prize judges for giving the top awards to books for reasons extrinsic to literature.’
    • ‘A prospective study would also be useful in assessing the intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors at play in short track speed skating.’
    • ‘The more precisely we understand how the machine works intrinsically, the better we can deduce the contribution of extrinsic factors.’
    • ‘In the original conception of this study, motivators were dichotomized into intrinsic and extrinsic factors.’
    • ‘Pressure ulcers result from numerous intrinsic and extrinsic factors.’
    • ‘Migration to other countries is in any case not extrinsic to the formation of such a nationalism.’
    • ‘In short, it appears that it's due to extrinsic factors, rather than anything the province of Ontario itself did.’
    • ‘This study therefore explores factors that are both extrinsic and intrinsic to news organization election coverage.’
    • ‘At this juncture, I reassert that population change in a given area is conditioned by its intrinsic and extrinsic factors.’
    • ‘The genetic integrity of organisms is constantly challenged by extrinsic and intrinsic factors.’
    • ‘Thus three-dimensionality was extrinsic to painting, which was essentially flat, in Greenberg's view.’
    • ‘Because of its observational nature, our study cannot differentiate between intrinsic or extrinsic factors in the reduced reproductive success.’
    external, extraneous, exterior, outside, outward, alien, foreign, adventitious, superficial, surface
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  • 2(of a muscle, such as an eye muscle) having its origin some distance from the part which it moves.

    • ‘Additional movement is caused by extrinsic muscles that arise from various cranial surfaces and enter the base of the tongue, pulling the tongue towards their attachments.’
    • ‘The extrinsic muscles of the larynx control the degree of tension on the vocal cords, and the intrinsic muscles regulate the glottis.’
    • ‘The extrinsic extensor tendon attaches to the base of the dorsum of the middle phalanx, and bands from the intrinsic hand muscles attach to the distal phalanx.’
    • ‘The thyroid cartilage and epiglottis are connected to the hyoid bone, and the cricoid cartilage is connected to the trachea by the extrinsic ligaments of the larynx.’
    • ‘Unlike the upper esophageal sphincter, the lower sphincter is not pulled open by extrinsic musculature.’

Origin

Mid 16th century (in the sense ‘outward’): from late Latin extrinsecus ‘outward’, from Latin extrinsecus ‘outwardly’, based on exter ‘outer’; the ending was altered under the influence of -ic.

Pronunciation

extrinsic

/ɛkˈstrɪnsɪk//ɪkˈstrɪnsɪk/