Definition of extrapolation in English:

extrapolation

noun

mass noun
  • 1The action of estimating or concluding something by assuming that existing trends will continue or a current method will remain applicable.

    ‘sizes were estimated by extrapolation’
    ‘caution is advised in the interpretation and extrapolation of results’
    count noun ‘the figure is an extrapolation from prior data’
    • ‘Such wild extrapolation is not in keeping with the news standards of the New York Times.’
    • ‘I would be very cautious with such extrapolations.’
    • ‘Much of this is based on speculative extrapolation.’
    • ‘There are so many minor but questionable extrapolations and speculations as to divert even the sympathetic reader away from his greater historical aims.’
    • ‘Any such extrapolation based on one incident only is a most unscientific and unreliable basis for projections.’
    • ‘As a scientist I'd need more detail before making an extrapolation.’
    • ‘These ideas, their precursors, their extrapolations and their interpretations have been repeatedly turned over during the last 120 years.’
    • ‘An extrapolation of current trends clearly indicates the need for fundamental changes in the structure of supercomputing systems in the future.’
    • ‘Its projections are not forecasts but extrapolations of present trends.’
    • ‘Given that many economists have a difficult time identifying turning points in economic activity, perhaps it is not unreasonable for most people to rely on trend extrapolation.’
    1. 1.1Mathematics The extension of a graph, curve, or range of values by inferring unknown values from trends in the known data.
      ‘extrapolation of the logarithmic curve yielded an estimate of 66 species’
      • ‘Therefore, it is not possible to estimate by extrapolation the O 2 concentration in the water resulting in anoxia in the lacunae.’
      • ‘She was concerned that this figure of 6 .8 million was derived solely from mathematical extrapolations.’
      • ‘Linear extrapolation was used to define reference values in children above 8.’
      • ‘This estimate is between the linear and linear quadratic extrapolations from data on A bomb survivors.’
      • ‘The calibration for 730 nm was obtained by extrapolation from the calibration graph.’
      • ‘We should not make unwarranted extrapolations of simulation results to real sequence data.’
      • ‘Some information on density is available from laboratory experiments; other data must be estimated by extrapolation.’
      • ‘Extrapolation of the curve of viscosity vs temperature gives a figure for temperature of 13 °C.’
      • ‘The extrapolation from any data set to the whole genome will be plagued by possible biases in representation until the two respective genomes are sequenced and annotated.’

Pronunciation

extrapolation

/ɪkstrapəˈleɪʃ(ə)n/