Definition of exquisite in English:

exquisite

Pronunciation /ɪkˈskwɪzɪt//ˈɛkskwɪzɪt/

adjective

  • 1Extremely beautiful and delicate.

    ‘exquisite, jewel-like portraits’
    • ‘Neither of us ever had sampled a more exquisite delicacy.’
    • ‘He could give her gifts as exquisite and beautiful as the jewelled butterfly he'd given her on the day he realised he loved her.’
    • ‘You're always beautiful, with you dark curls and beautiful eyes and exquisite skin.’
    • ‘Their delicate and exquisite prints, some of which use gampi paper as their base, sell for very reasonable prices, an opportunity that may not last.’
    • ‘She has delighted in rendering in delicate detail and exquisite colour the little-known plants and creatures of the desert.’
    • ‘I felt I was in the presence of an angel; a wondrous, exquisite but delicate angel.’
    • ‘Executed with breathlessly fine strokes, these exquisite images are as beautiful and accomplished as line drawings by Picasso or Matisse.’
    • ‘It is the most beautiful, immaculate, exquisite piece of paper - splendidly printed, if not actually embossed.’
    • ‘With over 25 stands displaying their beautiful range of exquisite handmade crafts, the fair is sure to attract a large gathering’
    • ‘Without creativity, even the most exquisite and beautiful long hair cannot be said to be fashionable.’
    • ‘These beautiful houses with exquisite carvings were built by eight brothers.’
    • ‘With beautiful scenery and exquisite costumes, Coppelia is a truly delightful production to charm audiences of all ages.’
    • ‘A ring was placed on top of her bag, a really beautiful, exquisite ring.’
    • ‘Her fine exquisite features and extremely pale skin were making her look as a statue made by a sculptor master.’
    • ‘They expect a degree of service to go with the exquisite delicacies they have selected for purchase.’
    • ‘The feature on fathers and daughters, was exquisite, delightful and beautifully written.’
    • ‘My friend has a website filled with beautiful art and exquisite illustrations.’
    • ‘Gold and silver were made into exquisite adornments, and beautiful objects were created from indigenous turquoise, marble, and other stones.’
    • ‘Here, his theme of moral redemption is reflected in the renewing of the seasons - a beautiful metaphor in this exquisite film.’
    • ‘Salmon is an exquisite delicacy and is also a complete health food, nutritionists tell us.’
    beautiful, lovely, elegant, graceful
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  • 2Intensely felt.

    ‘the most exquisite kind of agony’
    • ‘My heart was simultaneously full of exquisite joy and unbearable sadness.’
    • ‘It's a form of exquisite torture watching George and Martha torment each other, and occasionally this becomes tiresome.’
    • ‘The spring rain that she had worshipped before now trickled down the back of her neck like the most exquisite torture.’
    • ‘I still remember the exquisite agony of my first ice cream headache - no one had warned me not to inhale a chocolate milkshake.’
    • ‘It was an illuminating moment of exquisite agony still vivid these many years later.’
    • ‘Where was the pain of probing the pressure points, the exquisite agony of muscular crystals breaking up under relentless fingers?’
    • ‘It's like tapping a spoon on a bad tooth, exquisite agony.’
    • ‘The last eight years working with her had been, to say the least, the most exquisite type of torture.’
    • ‘Nights of research, practicing accents, roles and dances, were exquisite torture.’
    • ‘She found it exquisite torture to have to hold still, to remain kneeling, but somehow she managed.’
    • ‘We know envy as a state of exquisite tension, torment and ill-will, provoked by an overwhelming sense of inferiority, impotence and worthlessness.’
    • ‘And you wonder, lucid in exquisite agony, how this child will ever be born without tearing you in two,’
    • ‘It is an endearing trait, for it encapsulates the exquisite torture endured by so many football fans at this time of year.’
    • ‘The agony is not quite as exquisite as it has been in the past.’
    • ‘They both took quadruple bogey nines and suffered the exquisite torture that golf inflicts on all those who deign to play the game.’
    • ‘These sorts of wounds are sharp, quick, and part of the game's exquisite agonies.’
    • ‘And it must be the most exquisite torture to be a centrist who is also a patriot.’
    • ‘But in practice the prohibition means exquisite torture for the fighting men and women who crave and deserve a stiff drink at day's end.’
    • ‘I could empathise with the exquisite torture of figuring out your place in the world.’
    • ‘It drew on sociological studies from several countries that describe confinement under sentence of death as exquisite psychological torture.’
    intense, acute, keen, piercing, sharp, severe, racking, excruciating, agonizing, harrowing, torturous, tormenting, searing
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    1. 2.1 Highly sensitive or discriminating.
      ‘her exquisite taste in painting’
      • ‘My hostess was a woman dressed in exquisite taste, friendly but politely distant.’
      • ‘The nervous system is thus specialized skin that has been internalized to preserve its exquisite sensitivity and responsiveness.’
      • ‘Musically, the film is epic yet nuanced, and evidences an exquisite sensitivity to detail.’
      • ‘A catalogue of unparalleled scope and exquisite taste accompanied the exhibit.’
      • ‘He had exquisite taste in literature, but curiously enough these wonderful books didn't sell.’
      • ‘She had exquisite taste and a flawless grasp of the Court's Byzantine code of conduct.’
      • ‘His exquisite taste and critical attitude has resulted in a collection in the finest imaginable condition.’
      • ‘His exquisite sensitivity to the difficulties faced by employers never failed him.’
      • ‘They have exquisite taste in home furnishings.’
      • ‘How could someone so morally degenerate have such exquisite taste?’
      • ‘Happily, the technology is now doing its job, collecting data methodically and with exquisite sensitivity.’
      • ‘Soprano Juliane Banse's fruity voice is neither childish nor stereotypically innocent, but her diction and sensitivity to words are exquisite.’
      • ‘Clearly, however, he is a man of exquisite taste and judgement.’
      • ‘The exquisite sensitivity of the nose can be defeated by a common cold.’
      • ‘The exquisite taste in clothing of the Indian upper class is in sharp contradistinction to its complete indifference to the external appearance of houses and streets.’
      • ‘I'd like to think that I'm a man of exquisite taste.’
      • ‘Not only did she touch my heart with her sincere and charming correspondence, I was impressed with her exquisite taste and her very modest requests.’
      • ‘Its high-ceilinged rooms, designed by Sir Christopher Wren, are decorated and furnished with exquisite taste.’
      • ‘Sirk's is a popular cinema fashioned with exquisite taste during what we now know as the twilight of Hollywood's self-enclosed grandeur.’
      • ‘In nearly five decades of concert going this writer has rarely heard more exquisite, sensitively projected Chopin.’
      discriminating, discerning, sensitive, selective, fastidious
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noun

literary
  • A man who is affectedly concerned with his clothes and appearance; a dandy.

    • ‘Using brightly coloured, almost grotesque distortion of an individual's salient features, he targeted the royal family, politicians, society figures, exquisites, and charlatans.’
    dandy, fop, beau, man about town, bright young thing, glamour boy, rake
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Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘precise’): from Latin exquisit- ‘sought out’, from the verb exquirere, from ex- ‘out’ + quaerere ‘seek’.

Pronunciation

exquisite

/ɪkˈskwɪzɪt//ˈɛkskwɪzɪt/