Definition of expatriate in English:

expatriate

noun

Pronunciation /ɪksˈpeɪtrɪət//ɛksˈpeɪtrɪət//ɛksˈpatrɪət//ɪksˈpatrɪət/
  • 1A person who lives outside their native country.

    ‘American expatriates in London’
    • ‘Some 305,000 expatriates (around 12 percent of the electorate) were eligible to vote.’
    • ‘The Minister of Immigration is looking at how to encourage more migration back by expatriates, and he will be looking for input and ideas from employers.’
    • ‘British expatriates monopolized the upper echelons of the civil service until the late 1980s.’
    • ‘It is also ironic that the articulation of national characteristics is an enterprise dominated by immigrants and expatriates.’
    • ‘The report points out there are at least 1.5 million skilled expatriates from developing countries employed in western Europe, the United States, Australia and Japan.’
    • ‘The truth is that an American expatriate has a foreign income exclusion.’
    • ‘The Island sounded a similar call, noting that Sri Lankan expatriates had telephoned the newspaper requesting that it promote national unity.’
    • ‘In Manila and Jakarta, the situation was somewhat better with tourists and foreign expatriates apparently not disturbed by the horrific events in Bali.’
    • ‘The school follows the U.K. National Curriculum of teaching and all teachers are native English speaking expatriates, recruited predominantly from the U.K.’
    • ‘A community of foreign expatriates who have taken Vincentian citizenship live in the southeast section of the main island.’
    • ‘The tax plan was primarily aimed at French expatriates who dominate the state administration and enjoy a far higher standard of living than most of the indigenous population.’
    • ‘I'd also want to know if he's ever considered becoming an expatriate.’
    • ‘His brief was to ‘create investment opportunities’ for expatriates in the fledgling economy.’
    • ‘They may be employed in retail stores, cafes or holiday resorts, serving the needs of tourists, or as housekeepers in the homes of expatriates, but they return each day to a dismal shanty area.’
    • ‘Will refugees or expatriates, who may be well educated and have experience and skills, choose to return to East Timor?’
    • ‘It is based on misinformation from foreign-funded expatriates.’
    • ‘An American expatriate now living in Barcelona, Spain, she and her husband teach English and French.’
    • ‘The lines of men and women outside polling stations were expatriates casting early votes for a new government.’
    • ‘The majority of these so-called expatriates have come to the Gulf from desperately poor neighbouring regions of Asia and Africa.’
    • ‘Government policy is designed to improve and promote opportunities in New Zealand, and it looks to attract highly skilled and talented people, including expatriates.’
    newcomer, settler, incomer, new arrival, migrant, emigrant
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1archaic An exile.
      emigrant, non-native, émigré, migrant, economic migrant, guest worker
      View synonyms

adjective

Pronunciation /ɛksˈpeɪtrɪət//ɪksˈpatrɪət//ɛksˈpatrɪət//ɪksˈpeɪtrɪət/
  • 1Denoting or relating to a person living outside their native country.

    ‘expatriate workers’
    • ‘This court normally comprises expatriate judges, currently including representatives from Australia, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea.’
    • ‘The journal started its existence in 1930 by soliciting the opinions of expatriate writers about Proust's art and its possible influence.’
    • ‘Malaria-related health insurance costs for expatriate workers and their families provide a powerful disincentive for manufacturing activities.’
    • ‘Most avant-garde works, if they sell at all, go to expatriate business-people and diplomats - and now to Western art dealers and museum curators on buying trips.’
    • ‘Women are very happy to work extremely hard on a project when an outsider such as an expatriate advisor or consultant, takes responsibility but will not take the initiative to begin a process.’
    • ‘The information is used to assist multinational companies in determining compensation allowances for their expatriate workers.’
    • ‘The European Union was more frank, when it withdrew its expatriate staff last week because of what it described as the ‘general tension and uncertainty’ in the country.’
    • ‘Striking oil workers holding expatriate staff hostage agreed to release them on Friday.’
    • ‘A large part of the business remains the broadcasting of sport to expatriate communities.’
    • ‘The only people who turned up for work were expatriate teachers in management and those on temporary contracts.’
    • ‘During the negotiation stages, project developers who are mostly expatriate men are usually reluctant to work outside frameworks that are considered customary.’
    • ‘A multinational firm gives cash to immigration officials so they will promptly grant legitimate visa requests for their expatriate employees.’
    • ‘It was a golden opportunity for him to see the living conditions of expatriate labourers who live in the camps, braving the scorching heat and adverse conditions.’
    • ‘Do expatriate writers and artists create cultural continuums that have more to do with a sense of regional internationalism than the binary of motherland and exile?’
    • ‘Fiji's Court of Appeal - comprised of expatriate judges - ordered the restoration of the Constitution and the staging of elections.’
    • ‘A great deal is expected of expatriate workers, but many organisations underestimate the nature and severity of the difficulties faced by workers when they go abroad.’
    • ‘This became a major issue as the population of expatriate children fluctuated; little English was spoken outside of group activities.’
    • ‘However, even after Independence in 1947, British expatriate firms did not suddenly divest from India.’
    • ‘He is an expatriate rebel leader from the Spanish Civil War living in France.’
    • ‘Just under 100 expatriate workers are still trapped on the four rigs.’
    emigrant, living abroad, working abroad, non-native, émigré
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1archaic Expelled from one's native country.
      • ‘It is estimated about 150,000 exiled and expatriate Iraqis in the UK are eligible to vote in the January 30 election.’
      • ‘Expatriate Saudis living in London, notionally providing opposition in exile, had been bought off long ago.’
      • ‘She also incarnates expatriate women, like Hooda, living in exile in London.’
      • ‘Do you consider yourself an expatriate writer, and if so, what does your exile serve?’
      • ‘An eclectic collection of expatriate figures in exile have found it difficult to unite over common principles.’

verb

[with object]
Pronunciation /ɪksˈpeɪtrɪeɪt//ɛksˈpeɪtrɪeɪt//ɛksˈpatrɪeɪt//ɪksˈpatrɪeɪt/
  • Send (a person or money) abroad.

    ‘we expatriated the prisoners of war immediately after the end of the war’
    ‘people that have illegally expatriated funds’
    ‘money found to have been expatriated to Singapore banks’
    ‘the poet was then expatriated from France’
    no object ‘candidates should be willing to expatriate’
    • ‘He expatriated from New Orleans in 1980.’
    • ‘Many who expatriated will return to invest their money.’
    • ‘I am American, sometimes I wish I could expatriate but at the moment that just isn't an option.’
    • ‘In 1952, he expatriated to France because of racism; and in 1955, he moved to Madrid, Spain, where he spent the last thirty-six years of his life.’
    • ‘The current project focuses on measuring ‘gravitational’ issues, as they affect skilled professionals currently expatriated from New Zealand.’
    settle abroad, live abroad, relocate abroad
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 18th century (as a verb): from medieval Latin expatriat- ‘gone out from one's country’, from the verb expatriare, from ex- ‘out’ + patria ‘native country’.

Pronunciation

expatriate

Noun/ɪksˈpatrɪət/

expatriate

Adjective/ɪksˈpatrɪət/

expatriate

Verb/ɪksˈpatrɪeɪt/