Definition of executive order in English:

executive order

noun

US
Law
  • A rule or order issued by the president to an executive branch of the government and having the force of law.

    • ‘That has not been addressed by the Supreme Court, and that is what the new executive order and legislation attempt to answer.’
    • ‘Well, if the judge determines that the law is unconstitutional, then the executive order issued pursuant to that law is not a lawful order.’
    • ‘Presidents establish policy by issuing executive orders, national security directives, and, under the current Bush administration, homeland security directives.’
    • ‘And they would be subject to a military tribunal, under the executive order that the President signed.’
    • ‘The ‘plunge protection team’ was established by a special executive order issued by former President Ronald Reagan in 1989.’
    • ‘He issued an executive order directing the Secretary of Commerce to seize and operate several steel mills.’
    • ‘Other presidents have shared this view, using their power to issue executive orders and regulations to solve problems when Congress failed to fulfill its responsibilities.’
    • ‘The US presently has executive orders and legislation in place to impose sanctions on any company (US or otherwise) that develops Iran's oil fields.’
    • ‘National government power generally has expanded over state power through Supreme Court decisions, constitutional amendments, executive orders, and federal statutes.’
    • ‘Now he seems to have retreated to something more like a ‘reinventing government’ strategy, using executive orders and rule changes.’
    • ‘President Hoover signed an executive order setting aside the lands around the Hoover Dam and Lake Mead as a recreation area and wildlife refuge.’
    • ‘And last but not least, the president has been issuing executive orders that have been implementing many of the ideas.’
    • ‘We were unable to pass legislation permanently ending it, but extensive assurance was given, executive orders were issued, and the Army was supposed to be out of the domestic spying business.’
    • ‘Every president has used executive orders to bypass Congress.’
    • ‘It's hard to measure the scope of any president's ambitions by the number of laws or executive orders he signs.’
    • ‘By executive order, President Truman outlawed the separation of races in the armed services.’
    • ‘Good manners in a democracy dictate that executive orders issued by an outgoing president at the end of his mandate never deal with questions of high importance for the political future of the country.’
    • ‘He established a headquarters and local branch offices, rules and by-laws; he found people to act as officials, and issued executive orders to members making their activities official.’
    • ‘The president then issued an executive order instituting a ‘loyalty program’ for government employees.’
    • ‘But the next President could well issue executive orders that would accomplish big changes.’