Definition of exchange control in English:

exchange control

noun

  • A governmental restriction on the movement of currency between countries.

    • ‘The movement of capital (and thus the ability to invest abroad) is often obstructed by exchange control regulations and investment restrictions, imposed either by the home or the foreign country.’
    • ‘Access by the general public to the exchange control department of the Bank of Namibia is only available through an authorised dealer.’
    • ‘Many people are happy to hold assets in an offshore financial centre, comforted by the thought that those assets are outside the reach of creditors, unfriendly governments, exchange control regulations and unnecessary death duties.’
    • ‘This was an ‘annual phenomenon’ resulting from pre-budget speculation of what the next move would be in the government's committed drive to gradually abolish remaining exchange control restrictions.’
    • ‘The result of the relaxation of exchange control is that you have the option to invest offshore.’
    • ‘In line with government's expressed policy of gradual liberalisation of exchange control, the following changes will be effected.’
    • ‘However it is regretted that the Minister did not take the opportunity to further relax the existing exchange control restrictions.’
    • ‘A large part is through Singapore because of their lax exchange control laws.’
    • ‘But Haughey did concede that he had applied to the Central Bank for exchange control approval for the sterling equivalent of £400,000 from Guinness and Mahon Cayman Trust in December 1982.’
    • ‘There are no exchange control or reporting requirements; deposits earn tax-free interest; funds can be moved in and out freely; and there is an excellent telecommunications system.’
    • ‘Elsewhere in the book, such as the piece on trade by Julio Berlinski, many other important issues are raised such as tariffs and exchange control.’
    • ‘Regarding exchange control, some promises and two interesting concrete announcements were made.’
    • ‘In many countries it is restricted by exchange control legislation, the object of which is to safeguard the stability of the national currency and to prevent the undue outflow of local capital.’
    • ‘The capital and exchange control measures were meant to keep money inside the country and prevent the ringgit from weakening when the central bank cut interest rates.’
    • ‘Where exchange control is in place, a government may insist on payment by letters of credit to underpin it.’
    • ‘As Mauritius is not subject to the exchange control regulations that apply to South African banks, it would be possible to finance up to 100 per cent of the cost of the property, subject to credit requirements.’
    • ‘To make this happen, RBI will not have to totally dismantle the present exchange control regulations or usher in full convertibility to transform Mumbai into an international financial centre.’
    • ‘It is because we do not have exchange control regulations and we do not have dual currency.’
    • ‘The structure of any purchase will have a legal agreement in place, so the sleeping partner will not have an impact on the deal, except that exchange control will need to be notified that a portion of funds relate to each individual.’
    • ‘By speaking of ‘offenses’ relating to capital flight, he highlights that this kind of initiative would target only capital flight that broke exchange control regulations in poor countries.’