Definition of exaggerate in English:

exaggerate

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Represent (something) as being larger, better, or worse than it really is.

    ‘she was apt to exaggerate any aches and pains’
    no object ‘I couldn't sleep for three days—I'm not exaggerating’
    overstate, overemphasize, overstress, overestimate, overvalue, magnify, amplify, aggrandize, inflate
    overstated, overemphasized, inflated, magnified, amplified, aggrandized, excessive, hyperbolic, over-elaborate, overdone, overripe, overplayed, overdramatized, theatrical, dramatic, actorly, highly coloured, extravagant, melodramatic, sensational, sensationalist, sensationalistic
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1as adjective exaggerated Enlarged or altered beyond normal proportions.
      ‘exaggerated features such as a massive head and beetling brows’
      • ‘And so, with exaggerated care, you end up tip-toeing naked across the soggy floor.’
      • ‘In the end, one might think that goodness was only imaginary, an exaggerated western virtue.’
      • ‘Furthermore, there are no legal penalties for taking a false or exaggerated claim to court.’
      • ‘It's an exaggerated intensity of feeling invested in something which doesn't finally matter.’
      • ‘When politeness is all we have connecting us to others, incivility takes on an exaggerated significance.’
      • ‘I read to them every night in great detail and in exaggerated voices.’
      • ‘He also seems to suffer from a common complaint in the Ministry, an exaggerated respect for American power.’
      • ‘Footballers here are less inclined to tumble over in an exaggerated fashion or writhe around feigning injury.’
      • ‘We in the West have done far more than the Russians to publicise the fact that our children embody all of our exaggerated fears today.’
      • ‘Gun buying may be a response to an exaggerated amount of coverage of supposedly impending danger.’
      • ‘No one dragged their rivals to the court; there were very few exaggerated claims.’
      • ‘Experts say it's an exaggerated figure and don't want to even visualise such a situation.’
      • ‘Once the rain hits, it's clearly time for that exaggerated song and dance sequence.’
      • ‘It was so cartoonish and exaggerated that I felt sure it must look staged to anyone watching, but it was genuine enough.’
      • ‘His claims were regarded as exaggerated but thousands of dollars and fake passports and visa stamps were found in his house.’
      • ‘And, in this case, it is based on exaggerated assumptions and exaggerated statements.’
      • ‘Increased insurance premiums, because of the exaggerated number of personal injury claims every year.’
      • ‘This can lead to exaggerated food portions or over consumption of calories.’
      • ‘As soon as he walked in all cameras focused on him and his hero pals made an exaggerated show of affection towards him.’
      • ‘One stands splaying all his limbs around me in an exaggerated way.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from Latin exaggerat- ‘heaped up’, from the verb exaggerare, from ex- ‘thoroughly’ + aggerare ‘heap up’ (from agger ‘heap’). The word originally meant ‘pile up, accumulate’, later ‘intensify praise or blame’, giving rise to current senses.

Pronunciation

exaggerate

/ɪɡˈzadʒəreɪt//ɛɡˈzadʒəreɪt/