Definition of evidential in English:

evidential

adjective

formal
  • Of or providing evidence.

    ‘the evidential bases for her argument’
    • ‘But the comparators that can be of evidential value, sometimes determinative of the case, are not so circumscribed.’
    • ‘On behalf of the claimant, it is said that there would [be] no evidential prejudice to the defendant.’
    • ‘Now that there is a statutory definition, evidential criteria do not form part of the formulation of the question to be decided.’
    • ‘In such a case the tribunal does not have to refer back its evidential analysis for further submissions.’
    • ‘With the case approached that way, he submits that it is not necessary to plead the evidential estoppel.’
    • ‘Statutory presumptions placing an evidential burden on the accused do not breach the presumption of innocence.’
    • ‘It is said that the proven circumstances do not support an inference of confinement which is of evidential value in law.’
    • ‘The research papers relied on by the Appellant, although of some evidential value, are very general and speculative.’
    • ‘The section could only be rendered compatible by reading it as imposing simply an evidential burden on the defendant, rather than a burden of proof.’
    • ‘The onus which is placed upon the defendant is not an evidential one but a persuasive one, so that the defendant will be required to discharge the burden of proof.’
    • ‘Instead, passing a series of procedural hurdles would provide the necessary evidential basis.’
    • ‘It is a matter of law for the judge to decide whether the defendant has satisfied this evidential burden.’
    • ‘If you think it does not or may not have any evidential value, then you put that out of the equation as far at the prosecution are concerned.’
    • ‘The diary entry had accordingly no significance or evidential value.’
    • ‘As already noted, there are two prerequisites to the evidential shift in the burden of proof from the complainant to the other party.’
    • ‘Accordingly, there is no evidential basis upon which the appellant can assert that this is not an available alternative location.’
    • ‘The first is that it was the defendant's evidential case that was being tendered.’
    • ‘If you are not sure, disregard it because it has no evidential value.’
    • ‘The defence rightly perceive the evidential difficulties which arose in relation to it as one of the points which they could properly exploit.’
    • ‘The evidential issue was never addressed by the defendant.’

Origin

Early 17th century: from medieval Latin evidentialis, from Latin evidentia (see evidence).

Pronunciation:

evidential

/ˌɛvɪˈdɛnʃ(ə)l/