Definition of evict in English:

evict

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Expel (someone) from a property, especially with the support of the law:

    ‘a single mother and her children have been evicted from their home’
    • ‘He has just taken over the property that I live in and is evicting me with less than a month's notice.’
    • ‘Some landlords are also evicting people without so much as an appearance in court, in violation of due process.’
    • ‘Why does he not come straight out and say that he wants all landlords to evict every tenant who might be accused of upsetting the next door neighbour.’
    • ‘At present, landlords cannot evict tenants who are willing to pay prevailing market rates.’
    • ‘The decision to evict a member must be made in accordance with the by-laws established by the membership.’
    • ‘Our landlord tried to evict us three days before Christmas because he wanted more money.’
    • ‘York council has demonstrated its resolve to evict nuisance tenants.’
    • ‘The landlord wins a stack of cash and the right to evict his tenant.’
    • ‘It would, for example, prevent a landlord from evicting a widow from an apartment on the grounds that she was not the ‘registered’ tenant.’
    • ‘Landlords will retain the power to evict tenants who display anti-social behaviour.’
    • ‘Soon the association was strong enough to boycott local landlords who were evicting their tenants and offering the land to others at increased rents.’
    • ‘The order enabled the police to evict any tenants and board up the property.’
    • ‘I have now received a letter from the council evicting me from my property.’
    • ‘However, the law will also allow landlords to evict tenants much faster.’
    • ‘Remember that your landlord can't evict you unless the Régie du logement says he's allowed.’
    • ‘While evicting the tenants would increase the landlords income, it would cause hardship on the tenants.’
    • ‘After evicting her, the landlord started renovations in hopes of raising the rent for the next tenant.’
    • ‘Magistrates also ordered that he be evicted and imposed an injunction to keep him away from her for a year.’
    • ‘In some cases, workers were evicted from their homes to make way for new property development.’
    • ‘If he is evicted and made homeless he is bound to commit suicide, for which the council will be squarely responsible.’
    expel, eject, oust, remove, dislodge, turn out, put out, force out, throw out, throw out on the streets, throw out on one's ear, drum out, drive out
    dispossess, expropriate
    chuck out, kick out, boot out, heave out, bounce, give someone the heave-ho, give someone the old heave-ho, throw someone out on their ear, show someone the door
    turf out
    give someone the bum's rush
    defenestrate
    out
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘recover property by legal process’): from Latin evict- overcome, defeated, from the verb evincere, from e- (variant of ex-) out + vincere conquer.

Pronunciation:

evict

/ɪˈvɪkt/