Definition of estrangement in English:

estrangement

noun

  • 1[mass noun] The fact of no longer being on friendly terms or part of a social group:

    ‘the growing estrangement of the police from their communities’
    • ‘Most of his clients are people distraught at the estrangement of a family member.’
    • ‘Five years later, a life-altering crisis makes Tessa passionately determined to end this estrangement.’
    • ‘The gain of a moral commonality was in most cases at the cost of an estrangement from the academic environment.’
    • ‘Her novel is not about suicide but about friendship, loyalty, family tie and estrangement in global communities.’
    • ‘Certain social factors, such as disparities in socioeconomic status, can lead to estrangement and alienation between individuals.’
    • ‘Jen's account shows how deeply-felt were her experiences of estrangement from well meaning, middle-class women.’
    • ‘Society's estrangement from the future undermines the capacity to generate ideas about what needs to be done.’
    • ‘Even its somber rhythms, tinged with a cold electronic feeling, speak of disillusionment and estrangement.’
    • ‘The mutual estrangement has obscured in many respects the view of the living unique character of the other.’
    • ‘The choice, however, between relationship and estrangement is entirely ours.’
    • ‘This estrangement from her father was the hardest thing to bear.’
    • ‘Mr. Quinn's personal life contributed to his estrangement from the church.’
    • ‘Such philosophers, who teach estrangement in every sense, are still strangers to one another.’
    • ‘The point of departure in this work is the religious individual's sense of estrangement from Western culture.’
    • ‘It also visualizes her estrangement from her companions at an all-women's college at Oxford.’
    • ‘No man is capable of rectifying this state of estrangement from God.’
    • ‘The girls confront each other about their dead mom and their growing estrangement.’
    • ‘There is no record of estrangement or any lack of devotion towards those he had left behind.’
    • ‘She will sense herself diminished and her estrangement will begin.’
    • ‘I was aware that there had been some estrangement between the two.’
    alienation, turning away, antagonism, antipathy, disaffection, hostility, unfriendliness, embitteredness, isolation, variance, difference
    parting, separation, division, divorce, disunity, distance, break-up, split, breach, severance, schism
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The fact of no longer living with one's spouse or partner; separation:
      ‘a parent's rights in the event of divorce or estrangement’
      • ‘C. Hosea was in a state of estrangement with his wife Gomer.’
      • ‘He says that my father's bankruptcy "seems to have begun an estrangement between Jabez Barwick and his wife."’
      • ‘By 1982's Shoot Out The Lights the marriage was being openly dissected and both partners were on the way to permanent estrangement.’
      • ‘However angry with him I was, I could not stand another day of estrangement from him.’
      • ‘Only a second reading will reveal that it is also the event responsible for Lewis and Priscilla's long estrangement.’
      • ‘Despite their estrangement, Agatha thinks constantly of James, and he of her.’
      • ‘She ended up starring in the ill fated Buffalo 66, which led to their estrangement.’
      • ‘Asked to comment on his recent estrangement from his spouse, Rempel was unapologetic.’
      • ‘Her marriage to Mick appears to take the brunt of it although there is no obvious reason for their estrangement.’
      • ‘Schlegel settled in Berlin in 1802, and the increasing estrangement between them was resolved by a divorce in 1803.’
      • ‘Betjeman refused and blamed Waugh in part for the estrangement in his marriage.’

Pronunciation:

estrangement

/ɪˈstreɪn(d)ʒm(ə)nt/