Definition of espresso in English:

espresso

noun

  • A type of strong black coffee made by forcing steam through ground coffee beans:

    ‘he bought an espresso and a couple of croissants’
    [as modifier] ‘roadside espresso bars’
    • ‘We also ordered an espresso and a cappuccino and they were an additional 80p each.’
    • ‘In New York, if you look hard, it is still possible to get a double espresso from a real coffee shop that makes no attempt to look like your lounge.’
    • ‘His daughter was in Rome a couple of years ago and came in for a quick espresso at the bar.’
    • ‘As the name of the place suggests, you can also enjoy a cup of coffee at the store - from filter coffee to cappuccino and espressos.’
    • ‘I therefore will endeavour to buy some freshly ground espresso coffee in the near future.’
    • ‘I kept vowing to stop drinking the coffee, but my boss kept buying me double espressos, so this went on for quite some time.’
    • ‘They sipped their espressos and cappuccinos from the coffee shop next door that was practically part of the theatre.’
    • ‘They even managed to get an order for two coffees and two espressos wrong.’
    • ‘My dad found his coffee beans and began measuring them into the espresso machine.’
    • ‘It's open early to serve late-morning cappuccinos and espressos.’
    • ‘Lattes, cappuccinos and espressos are served with a selection of little cakes and pastries.’
    • ‘However, the little booth selling tickets also doubled as an espresso bar.’
    • ‘Put the ground espresso beans into the machine and press down very lightly.’
    • ‘In the end we had a couple of very good espressos and a bar of artisan chocolate from Belgium.’
    • ‘The next morning, swathed in a towel and sipping coffee from my new espresso cups, life felt fine.’
    • ‘So, obviously, I will not be buying any coffee from that particular espresso bar in future.’
    • ‘Embarrassed now, I ordered two espressos from the girl at the counter.’
    • ‘In the catering trade milk may be heated with a jet of superheated steam from an espresso machine, which makes it froth rather than form a skin.’
    • ‘As well as the usual range of coffees (starting with espressos for £1), there's an excellent range of cakes and pastries, a tapas menu and, in true coffee-house style, weekly acoustic music evenings.’
    • ‘Stand at the bar (it costs more to sit down at a table) with the locals at an Italian coffee shop and down an expresso and a pastry.’

Usage

The spelling expresso is not used in the original Italian and is strictly incorrect, although it is common

Origin

From Italian (caffè) espresso, literally pressed out (coffee).

Pronunciation:

espresso

/ɛˈsprɛsəʊ/