Definition of erotica in English:

erotica

noun

  • [mass noun] Erotic literature or art.

    • ‘I, for one, initially advocated a statement saying we were not interested in genre work, or erotica.’
    • ‘The members of the panel had several different views as to what pornography is, and whether there was a difference between pornography and erotica.’
    • ‘The internet has ushered in a brave new world of access to a polymorphously perverse spectrum of erotica, pornography and discussion.’
    • ‘The debate over whether or not the book is erotica or pornography misses the heart of the text's importance.’
    • ‘The exegesis explores the genre of women's erotica and is well grounded in contemporary critical theory.’
    • ‘A technical, if admittedly simplistic, analogy: horror is to gore as erotica is to pornography.’
    • ‘There will be shows about French decontructionism and shows about science physical response to sexual stimuli, including erotica or actual people.’
    • ‘But Payne isn't much interested in debating the distinction between erotica and porn.’
    • ‘He is also obsessed with vernacular imagery, from family photo albums to vintage erotica.’
    • ‘Even the sex industry has fought off threats of censorship by grafting Shakespeare onto erotica.’
    • ‘This shows that a conceptual distinction between pornography and erotica is both meaningful and operational.’
    • ‘However, adverbs and adjectives are the foundations - and flying buttresses - of pornography and erotica.’
    • ‘Yes, I firmly believe if a literary critic is not interested in erotica he should change jobs.’
    • ‘She confesses to having been shocked to learn that Makiki created rooms filled with erotica.’
    • ‘But while some of the scenarios are necessarily arousing, the book does not intend to function as pornography or erotica.’
    • ‘Definitions of erotica, degrading pornography, and violent pornography can be problematic.’
    • ‘One of the more consistent concerns is the presence of pornography and erotica and the expression of sexuality on the Internet.’
    • ‘The author explains that she is collecting erotica from Indigenous writers in order to counteract stereotypes and misconceptions.’
    • ‘With his inventive sense of flattened, decorative form and composition, he has truly reinvented the still life, but he is also a master of whimsical erotica.’
    • ‘Some of the pieces skim the boundaries of adult fiction without delving into hardcore erotica.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from Greek erōtika, neuter plural of erōtikos (see erotic).

Pronunciation:

erotica

/ɪˈrɒtɪkə/