Main definitions of erg in English

: erg1erg2

erg1

noun

Physics
  • A unit of work or energy, equal to the work done by a force of one dyne when its point of application moves one centimetre in the direction of action of the force.

    • ‘His stomach did flip-flops as the starter zinged and grumbled for a perilously long time before the tired six cylinder engine finally fired, seeming to suck the last few ergs of power from the aged battery.’
    • ‘The peak photon energy occurs at 10 keV and the total X-ray luminosity is 1045 ergs / sec.’
    • ‘But nevertheless the universe is accelerating, which could be explained by a tiny amount of vacuum energy - about 10-8 ergs per cubic centimeter, if you care.’
    • ‘Luckily, there are plenty of units for energy, so it is probably best to just leave the calorie unit to the food people, and use joules or Kilowatt hours or therms or ergs for energy calculations unrelated to human nutrition.’
    • ‘An energy unit - be it an erg, joule, BTU, or other - describes a definitive amount of energy.’
    • ‘In 1914, Henri and Moycho determined that 280 nm was the most lethal emission line of the arc lamps, and they calculated that an emission energy of 2 X 105 erg / cmz was needed to kill the bacteria.’
    • ‘For the three days he'd trained with Richard Grau, he'd focused every erg of mental and physical energy into the forms.’
    • ‘One rad equals 100 ergs of absorbed energy per gram of target matter.’
    • ‘There are no ergs, joules, electron-volts, calories, or foot-pounds of New Age energy.’

Origin

Late 19th century: from Greek ergon work.

Pronunciation:

erg

/əːɡ/

Main definitions of erg in English

: erg1erg2

erg2

noun

  • An area of shifting sand dunes in the Sahara.

    • ‘The navigation will be a key element, as it will be necessary to find the the best passes to get over some difficult ergs, through breathtaking landscapes.’
    • ‘Those who were ahead of us entered an erg of dunes and Gio and I took a better path.’
    • ‘Competitors face a technical track never previously used in the Dakar that requires careful navigation through breathtaking passes and over unavoidable ergs.’
    • ‘For photographers, the atmosphere of the pinnacles changes dramatically as the light varies and these ergs provide a great opportunity to capture those shafts of sunlight which are so spectacular early and late in the day.’
    • ‘The sand seas or ergs cover thousands of square kilometres, and in places the sand cover may be hundreds of metres thick.’

Origin

Late 19th century: from French, from Arabic ‘irk, ‘erg.

Pronunciation:

erg

/əːɡ/